The Universe, etc.

“I'm interested in their mechanisms and the phenomena and scenes that occur in them…” - the artist

Like Young Girl, 2019, Mixed Media, 30 x 20 cm, $110

Like Young Girl, 2019, Mixed Media, 30 x 20 cm, $110

The big things that surround us, the world, nature, the universe, etc. I'm interested in their mechanisms and the phenomena and scenes that occur in them. I am particularly fascinated by the mysteries of the universe, and I think that the images were abstract, so I create abstract works.

Late at Night, 2019, Mixed Media, 20 x 30 cm, $110

Late at Night, 2019, Mixed Media, 20 x 30 cm, $110

I started drawing pictures on my computer from around 1999. I scanned the handwritten manuscript with a black sign pen and made a work by the method of coloring it on a personal computer. It was a concrete painting this time.

Passion, 2019, Mixed Media, 30 x 40 cm, $220

Passion, 2019, Mixed Media, 30 x 40 cm, $220

The digital painting by this technique continued until around 2014, but because I felt it was flat, I started painting oil paintings and acrylic paintings around 2010.

Freshly, 2019, Mixed Media, 20 x 30 cm, $110

Freshly, 2019, Mixed Media, 20 x 30 cm, $110

These were released from around 2012, and had been announced for a while to mix concrete and abstract, digital and analogue, and it was more likely to draw an abstract picture at the same time as an analog one from around 2015.

Breeze and Flower Bed, 2019, Mixed Media, 45.5 x 53 cm, $440

Breeze and Flower Bed, 2019, Mixed Media, 45.5 x 53 cm, $440

Since 2016, I have made extensive use of current paints and collages, and began to create works of so-called mixed media, such as flat and semi-solid and solid, and almost established his style. However, he uses a variety of art supplies, materials, and supports to make high quality works every day.

To view more work by the artist, please visit ydart.exout.net. You may also follow the artist in Instagram @yadamaniart.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Words Across the Lifting Fog

Words Across the Lifting Fog

a poem by Iris Orpi

 

I could have told you loneliness

sticks to the spirit like craft glitter on sweat

from a cheap crazy party you once went to

so you could forget whatever merits forgetting

and fill yourself up with loud things

you would remember for years to come.

Blaring music and confetti and damp, smoky

air the smell of drunken kisses wafting

towards you out of nowhere as you cut

across a field of elk pasture the most clichéd

shade of green and silence as complete

as your sense of self used to be

draped over the mid-morning sky.

Instead we looked off the distance

in the same direction and I talked about

shaping the future, motioning with my hands

like I still believed the future was clay-like

and my hands were masterful, betraying

no trace of the knowledge that everything

beyond here and now is more like forged steel,

cold and unforgiving and only tarnished

in places, just so you and I could get excited

about the light that reflects off it and projects

onto our jaded vision bright portents,

so we could mimic the excitement we had

too much of when we were children. No mention

of loneliness and what it does to the clichéd

green of the pasture and why the fog bears

an uncanny resemblance to it. But maybe

you caught it anyway, the strained reaching

for home, for an old abandoned dream,

for surfaces of things that have faded

from diligent dusting, for the act of dusting,

for the dust that have finally settled and

claimed what used to be well loved and

cared for, beyond my sight. In the timbre

of my voice, maybe, a tad confident

and crafted for an audience, or the parts of

the narrative that felt deliberately omitted

to avoid clutter, to improve clarity. So you

could see me better. But the dust I don’t

point to is part of the picture. It is hardest

to wipe off around the edges. And that’s

how you know it’s authentic.

Photo source: the author

Photo source: the author

About the author:

Iris Orpi is a Filipina writer currently living in Chicago with her husband and son. Her alter ego is a university mathematics instructor who likes to incorporate CSI episodes and milkshake recipes in trigonometry and calculus problems. Drawing a hyperbolic paraboloid on chalkboard remains one of my greatest personal achievements. She has watched Memoirs of a Geisha at least 50 times. One of her life missions is to own all the books in Rex Stout’s Nero Wolfe series. Some of her greatest loves include flip-flops, recycling, pho with lots of Sriracha, 1960’s jazz, algebraic number theory, the ocean, and the color olive green. She prefers her coffee a la breve but occasionally [will] order dark mocha when she wants to be fancy. She is broke but [intend’s] to travel the world someday.

To learn more about the author, please visit sheisiris.wordpress.com. To purchase any of her published works, please click here.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Geometric Abstraction

“The arresting use of a limited palate of bold, saturated, unadulterated contemporary colours makes the work shout out to the viewer in much the same way as the colours of corporate branding.” - the artist

No Way! 1. 2019, Acrylic on canvas, 20 cm x 20 cm, $250

No Way! 1. 2019, Acrylic on canvas, 20 cm x 20 cm, $250

Sally Gorham’s work is concerned with the tension between individual freedom and systems of control in democratic societies. It takes on a structured orderly appearance, and the hard-edged, concrete nature of the work borrows from the visual vocabulary of constructivism and geometric abstraction.

No Way! 2. 2019, Acrylic on canvas, 20 cm x 20 cm, $250

No Way! 2. 2019, Acrylic on canvas, 20 cm x 20 cm, $250

The playful, attention-grabbing use of colour and/or scale give the work immediate impact, transforming the space the work occupies. The use of repetition and series references the history of abstract painting. The arresting use of a limited palate of bold, saturated, unadulterated contemporary colours makes the work shout out to the viewer in much the same way as the colours of corporate branding.

No Way! 3. 2019, Acrylic on canvas, 20 cm x 20 cm, $250

No Way! 3. 2019, Acrylic on canvas, 20 cm x 20 cm, $250

The multi-part construction of many of the works enables them to be adapted and re-assembled in new situations, creating what Daniel Buren describes as an interdependence between the work and the site, subverting the notion of the autonomous art work. It also points to the way in which deregulation has allowed politicians and large corporations to manipulate facts and ‘the system’ to meet their own ends. My larger scale installations use the architecture of the institutional space to confront what Boris Groys describes as ‘the ambiguous character of the contemporary notion of freedom that functions in our democracies as a tension between sovereign [individual] and institutional freedom.’*

No Way! 4. 2019, Acrylic on canvas, 20 cm x 20 cm, $250

No Way! 4. 2019, Acrylic on canvas, 20 cm x 20 cm, $250

About the artist:

Eight years ago, Sally Gorham left her executive career in Health Care Management to pursue her passion for art. In 2016 she graduated with a BA in Fine Art from one of London's premier art schools, Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London.

Since graduating Sally has combined my own art practice with curating exhibitions of work by emerging/early career artists. Her own work, which ranges from large scale installations to multi-piece paintings has been shown at the Art Souterrain Festival in Canada, Luren Gallery in Suzhou, China as well as in London and other parts of the UK.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.sallygorham.com. You may also follow the artist on Instagram @sally.gorham.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Aftermath

“Charting misogynistic seas has been a life filled with creative material of identity and anamnesis.” - the artist

Bunny, 2019, graphite and collaged tissue on Japanese rice paper, 7 x 5, $500

Bunny, 2019, graphite and collaged tissue on Japanese rice paper, 7 x 5, $500

The Sweet Hereafter

Power
Identity
History

Aftermath

A bloody path, a lyrical journey...a statement on a moment of time...
an anthropological narrative...all of the possibilities
of a collection of text and images

Deer, 2019, graphite and collaged tissue on Japanese rice paper, 7 x 5, $500

Deer, 2019, graphite and collaged tissue on Japanese rice paper, 7 x 5, $500

Researching past, and engaging the present with themes of memory and observation, I am compiling my experiences in life and re-purposing the good and the bad, utilizing the complexity of exposure and involvement.

Fox, 2019, graphite and collaged tissue on Japanese rice paper, 7 x 5, $500

Fox, 2019, graphite and collaged tissue on Japanese rice paper, 7 x 5, $500

Referencing film, music, history, and poetry, mixed with discernment, judgement, tragedy and joy...this work reflects fiction and fact.

An unrelated order, a non-chronological trip, accesses and sub-texts, moral dictators and taciturn observers.

Pig, 2019, graphite and collaged tissue on Japanese rice paper, 7 x 5, $500

Pig, 2019, graphite and collaged tissue on Japanese rice paper, 7 x 5, $500

Lines, incisions, clear and iconic figures truly embodied, and disrupted, by culture. Bleeding, screaming, laughing/crying, cringing and fighting – referencing the complexities of the female life. A life reviewed in the Talkies, collected phrases of fiction, fact, lyric and (someone’s) confession.

Lion, 2019, graphite and collaged tissue on Japanese rice paper, 7 x 5, $500

Lion, 2019, graphite and collaged tissue on Japanese rice paper, 7 x 5, $500

A life reviewed in Glamour Pussies and The Pugilists, where identity of beauty is layered with the beast of survival. A life reviewed in The Winter of the Lonely Ghosts when, as poet Mary Reufle writes, “[youth] which is thankfully behind you as you would never want to be a girl again for any reason at all, you have discovered that being invisible is the biggest secret on earth, the most wondrous gift anyone could ever have given you.”

Polar Bear, 2019, graphite and collaged tissue on Japanese rice paper, 7 x 5, $500

Polar Bear, 2019, graphite and collaged tissue on Japanese rice paper, 7 x 5, $500

About the artist:

After a start in the Boston suburbs, Deb has worked for thirty five years as an art handler and curator doing exhibition work in museums and galleries, and driving miles in trucks. The palimpsest of these experiences has materially informed her art. Often the only woman on the job in the early days, the one sent for coffee and always expected to go with the flow. Deb found herself in the position of having her tools taken out of her hands (because there was an assumption that she did not know how to use them), and also working to stay on the good side of both co-workers and clients, those who very often found working with a woman very suspect. Charting misogynistic seas has been a life filled with creative material of identity and anamnesis.

But while telling a coherent story about others’ art is both refined craft and certain gift, one must consult the entirety of her history as an artist, and, perhaps more so, as a woman in the business of art, to understand the unique perspective her art affords. The study of identity in all its forms has been a driving force in her art.

With degrees from institutions on two continents (Mass College of Art, Boston, BFA, and Wimbledon College of Art, London, MA), gallery ownership and curatorial projects in two states (Greenport, New York, and Portland, Maine), art moving and installations from Maastricht to Dubai, it is understandable and fitting that Deb’s art focuses on disrupting linear impressions.

Deb currently divides her time between Maine and London.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.deborahwhitney.com. You may also follow the artist on Instagram @debswhit.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Inward Turn

“…represents an inward turn and an embrace of the aesthetic, dealing more with sensations and discovery rather than with program or theory.” - the artist

Abstract Forms I, 2019, oil cold wax on paper, 7 x 10 in., N.F.S.

Abstract Forms I, 2019, oil cold wax on paper, 7 x 10 in., N.F.S.

The paintings that I create express a raw and energetic approach. I repeatedly work and rework the image. The surfaces of my paintings are dense and textural. There are moments where layers of paint get scraped, smudged or smeared in a continuous additive and subtractive process.

Abstract Forms II, 2019, oil cold wax on paper, 8.5 x 11 in., N.F.S.

Abstract Forms II, 2019, oil cold wax on paper, 8.5 x 11 in., N.F.S.

Often using a somber color palette and exploring variations of greys, browns, and blues, my work takes on a mysterious and darkened mood.

Abstract Forms III, 2019, oil, cold wax on paper, 6 x 8.5 in., N.F.S.

Abstract Forms III, 2019, oil, cold wax on paper, 6 x 8.5 in., N.F.S.

My current body of work consists of a series of abstract paintings made entirely from invention. I explore issues of form, space, and dynamic plasticity. When starting a painting there is no specific vision in mind.

Abstract Forms IV, 2019, oil, cold wax on paper, 5 x 7 in., N.F.S.

Abstract Forms IV, 2019, oil, cold wax on paper, 5 x 7 in., N.F.S.

Forms and shapes are added and removed in a repeated cycle until something emerges from the materials that embodies and evokes a particular presence. Thus, improvisation plays a major role in my process. I frequently use a palette knife to apply the paint in thick layers, which also allows for a more unpredictable mark making approach.

Abstract Forms V, 2019, oil, cold wax on paper, 8 x 11 in., N.F.S.

Abstract Forms V, 2019, oil, cold wax on paper, 8 x 11 in., N.F.S.

It is understandable to see my work running counter to contemporary concerns regarding subject matter and content. Many artists today are exploring political, social, cultural or gender related themes. That said, my work is not predicated on a rejection of current trends as much as it is an alternate route.

Large Abstract Forms, 2019, oil, cold wax on canvas, 36 x 48 in., N.F.S.

Large Abstract Forms, 2019, oil, cold wax on canvas, 36 x 48 in., N.F.S.

It represents an inward turn and an embrace of the aesthetic, dealing more with sensations and discovery rather than with program or theory. I continue to pursue the ability to invoke a paint surface with authenticity and intensity for maximum engagement.

About the artist:

Sam Kelly is an artist currently residing in Dayton, Ohio. He earned a B.F.A. in painting from Wright State University and a M.F.A. in painting from University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. He also attended the Chautauqua School of Art. Sam is a member of the Dayton Society of Artists, The Contemporary Dayton and the Dutoit Gallery. Currently he teaches at the University of Dayton in the Department of Art and Design as an adjunct faculty member.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.samkellyart.com.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Noblewoman

“I was amazed of how beautiful and young noblewoman my mother looked like.” - the artist

Noblewoman 1, 2019, Photograph on cold-pressed paper, 340 gsm, archival inks, thread, 24 x 12 inches, 500$

Noblewoman 1, 2019, Photograph on cold-pressed paper, 340 gsm, archival inks, thread, 24 x 12 inches, 500$

Q: We were impressed by your style of photography with many textures. What led you to develop this technique?

A: I have always been very attracted by texture. I have used a lot of painting and collage in my previous work, and also made my own paper and let the pulp dried on the canvas, in order to create interesting texture to work on. I like to provoke the desire to touch the work, even though it is not allowed in galleries and museums, for understandable reason. When we look at a textured work, not only do we see it, but it also interacts with our sense of touch. Both senses are awakened.

Noblewoman 14, 2019, Photograph printed on museum grade cold-pressed paper (cotton and cellulose), 340 gsm, using archival quality pigmented inks. Limited edition, 1

Noblewoman 14, 2019, Photograph printed on museum grade cold-pressed paper (cotton and cellulose), 340 gsm, using archival quality pigmented inks. Limited edition, 1

Q: What inspires your subject matter?

A: At the death of my mother, my siblings and I went through a box of 1940’s photographs, and I was amazed of how beautiful and young noblewoman my mother looked like. So, I put aside some pictures of her and decided that I would eventually make an art project out of it.

Noblewoman 2, 2019, Photograph on cold-pressed paper, 340 gsm, archival inks, thread, 12 x 18 inches, 500$

Noblewoman 2, 2019, Photograph on cold-pressed paper, 340 gsm, archival inks, thread, 12 x 18 inches, 500$

Q: Can you describe the materials you use and your creative process?

A: The photographs described above, were digitally manipulated, they were collaged and merged with other photographs of mine or with pictures of some of my paintings. The final photomontages were printed on different textured or non-textured Fine Art paper. To some of them, thread or wool stitching were added, and holes were punched.

Noblewoman 11, 2019, Photograph on cold-pressed paper, 340 gsm, archival inks. Limited edition, 24 x 12 inches, 400$

Noblewoman 11, 2019, Photograph on cold-pressed paper, 340 gsm, archival inks. Limited edition, 24 x 12 inches, 400$

Q: We were impressed with your Best in Show piece, titled Noblewoman 11, as well as the rest of the collection. Tell us more about this piece/series.

A: Noblewoman 11, is a 1949 photograph of my mother, merged with a photograph of mine of a stormy sky in Kamouraska, Quebec, with modification and enhancement of the colors. The final result is a 24’’ x 12’’, printed photo on a professional metallic silver photo paper.

I considered that some of the pieces of this series did not need any more work then the digital collage, like Noblewoman 11. For others, I brought the printed digital photos with me in an art residency In Iceland, where I added texture and color with thread and wool.

Noblewoman 3, 2019, Photograph on cold-pressed paper, 340 gsm, archival inks, thread, 18 x 12 inches, 500$

Noblewoman 3, 2019, Photograph on cold-pressed paper, 340 gsm, archival inks, thread, 18 x 12 inches, 500$

Q: What do you hope for viewers to take away from your art?

A: Poetry and soul. I want my artwork to serve as a tool that enhance how we experience a room. Feel good, not just look good. It is about transforming somebody’s atmosphere and ambiance. It is said that 87% of our lives are inside buildings, so I would like my work to imbue people with a sense of well-being, empowerment and gentle joyfulness in these buildings. Making the ordinary extraordinary.

Noblewoman 10, 2019, Photograph printed on cold-pressed paper, 340 gsm, archival inks. Limited edition, 18 x 12 inches, 400$

Noblewoman 10, 2019, Photograph printed on cold-pressed paper, 340 gsm, archival inks. Limited edition, 18 x 12 inches, 400$

Q: How do you view your art career in five years?

A: Hopefully to keep on offering more and more value to people. My art business is about helping people in their day-to-day life, by enriching their environment, and adding to their sum of happiness. The more I grow, the more I can be helpful with the process of creation.

I aspire to make more businesses with decorators, hotels and public spaces. I also would like to cooperate to fund-raising campaign, for the progress of social causes.

About the artist:

Anne-Julie Hynes graduated from Concordia University of Montreal, Canada in 1991. Working with different mediums such as acrylic, collage, textile art, sculpture and photography, her work has been shown in different publications. She has been active in over fifty (50) exhibitions in Canada, China, Poland, Denmark, Germany, Austria, Hungary and Tahiti, and also has been chosen to participate in different research and creation art residencies around the world.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.annejuliehynes.com, as well as follow the artist on Instagram @annejuliehynes.

 


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Tableaux

“The series' build process feels almost theatrical; it's like designing a set where some undefined action is about to unfold.” - the artist

Blue Moon Waning, 2016, Hand built Diorama and Digital Photography, Size Varies, Price Upon Request

Blue Moon Waning, 2016, Hand built Diorama and Digital Photography, Size Varies, Price Upon Request

Q: We were impressed by your style of pairing a themed photograph with a hand--built diorama. What led you to develop this pairing?

A: My diorama-based work began with an interest in built environments (I have some training in architectural drafting, for example), so I think that, initially, Tableaux was about the idea of place. The series' build process feels almost theatrical; it's like designing a set where some undefined action is about to unfold. Including hints at possible character involvement just felt like a natural progression. I try to keep the work open-ended, though. I enjoy writing my own plot, but I find other people's stories every bit as fascinating as my own.

Q: What inspires your subject matter?

A: I wish I had a precise answer to this question, but, honestly, influences seem to flood in from a million different sources. Simultaneously. Sometimes a material or process leads to another idea; sometimes, I build off a specific memory or experience. There are perpetual influences in books, movies, television, pop-culture, and etcetera. If inspiration is a muse, it's often a messy one. It's a stream of consciousness thing, I guess. Quite frankly, I don't know how effectively I can define how I attempt to paddle through it.

Tableaux Noir: Le Kiosque, 2017, Hand built Diorama and Digital Photography, Size Varies, Price Upon Request

Tableaux Noir: Le Kiosque, 2017, Hand built Diorama and Digital Photography, Size Varies, Price Upon Request

Q: Can you describe the materials you use and your creative process?

A: One of the most challenging aspects of my practice is narrowing down my to-do list. I tend to over-plan; I've got sketches and notes everywhere. Most of these preliminary designs are extremely specific; fortunately, dioramas allow for incredible versatility. If I'm envisioning a nineteenth-century Parisian newspaper kiosk, I can't very easily grab a camera and walk right up to one. I might be able to hint at that experience with a small-scale build, however.

When I assemble a diorama, my materials list is long and varied; cardboard, foam board, plastics, fibers, sandpaper, polymer clay, beads, wood, paints, adhesives, joint compound, concrete patio pavers - in the case of a neon sign I might photograph an image on a phone screen (if a process or material yields the best results, I'm not too proud to cheat a bit). I tend to save and reuse packaging materials. It's incredibly flattering when someone tells you that you've made something from nothing. I take a perverse kind of pride in fashioning tiny wainscoting from a cereal box.

Tableaux Automatique: Walkout, 2017, Hand built Diorama and Digital Photography, Size Varies, Price Upon Request

Tableaux Automatique: Walkout, 2017, Hand built Diorama and Digital Photography, Size Varies, Price Upon Request

Q: We were impressed with your Best in Show piece, titled Pink Lemonade Semigloss, 2018. Tell us more about this piece/series.

A: Pink Lemonade Semigloss differs from most other Tableaux pieces in that its concept began with a character and moved toward the environment. As unimpressive as it sounds, it's accurate to say that aluminum can hair rollers strongly influenced the direction of the entire project. I mean; how often do you get the opportunity to include an element as unique and complex as that? To create the portrait, I taped some pink posterboard to a closet door. The large-scale faux wood paneling is my worktable turned on end (overlaid with a close-up photograph of my miniature paneling). I had envisioned the whole scene fairly early on in the process, but an attempt at unifying the miniature with all of the portrait's existing elements definitely influenced my result.

Pink Lemonade Semigloss, 2018, Hand built Diorama and Digital Photography, Size Varies, Price Upon Request

Pink Lemonade Semigloss, 2018, Hand built Diorama and Digital Photography, Size Varies, Price Upon Request

Q: What do you hope for viewers to take away from your art?

A: I think many people would like to be remembered for bettering the world in some monumentally significant way. Unfortunately, obtaining that level of artistic influence is a very tall order. Nevertheless, I continue to find motivation in attempting to produce work that is (hopefully) relatable. It's sincerely appreciated when someone infers exactly what I was thinking or feeling when I created art object x.  In many ways, however, I find it much more gratifying to be told that a particular piece has reminded an individual of something important to them. I'm elated when it feels like someone has connected to the work in a personal way.

Q: How do you view your art career in five years?

A: I hesitate to call my art experience a career; it's more of an unmappable, impractical obsession. I'm relatively certain that I will never be delighted with anything that I create or any outlandish goal that I somehow manage to obtain. Nevertheless, an endless list of ideas and an attempt at improving technique keeps me going; that and some truly incredible opportunities that I am eternally grateful for (like this article, for example). It's kind of like they say about sharks. I can't help it. There's something in my DNA that demands I keep swimming for as long as I possibly can.

About the artist:

Robert Matejcek obtained his BA in Art from Fontbonne University in St. Louis, Missouri. Robert's work, a combination of traditional and new media, has been exhibited both nationally and internationally. Originally from North Dakota, Robert currently resides with his wife and their guinea pigs in Rocky Ford, Colorado.

To view more work by the artist, please visit robertmatejcek.com, as well as www.facebook.com/robert.matejcek.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.


Another Day

Another Day

a poem by Katie C E Major

To be a poet,
You must think of an emotion
One that's either scarred or made you smile
To write the things
Your head has thought up for a while.

You can sit there tapping on the keys
Or holding your hands between your knees
For a comfort of knowing
Your words will ease.

But, in reality do we know
Our emotions will continue to grow
No matter how much we write or speak
Are we willing to take that leap?

I can sit alone, the heaviness in my heart like a tumor
Is it worth this life and house I call home?

I can smile and I can cry,
With a burden of being alive.
Although I'm happy, there’s a knock on my brain screaming away this pain.

I find beauty in the rain, and clouds in a sunny day.
I'm mixed and matched with a balance of happy and sad.

This is just human, this is us with no phase. I've tasted death with my own hands, a mistake only few will live through to make.
And above all I can honestly say, yin and yang is worth holding on for just another day.

Your mind will change and your heart will beat, with tears rolling down your cheeks. You will see tomorrow, with a smile and say
"I'm glad I made it, another day."

About the author:

Katie C E Major is a 21 year old student studying Psychology, Sociology, English Literature and Math, as well as photographer and a published author. Her goal is to be a psychology professor, and teach others to help others.

To view more of her work please visit www.wattpad.com/user/KatieCEMajor, as well as www.facebook.com/KatieCEMajor.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

The Eyes

The Eyes

a poem by Brea Holmes

I felt your eyes scan my face

As you sat on the arm of theatre chair across from me

You secretly stared as I talked to a friend

I turned and your eyes bored into mine

Your eyes shifted from admiration to worry

But I pretended not to notice

 

This wasn’t the first time

But it was one of the last

Not knowing that the countdown was

Only seconds away from us parting

 

I wanted to know why you looked at me that way

What you were you searching for

You always scanned me when I wasn’t looking

You watched me and said not one word

I pretended not to see

The way you looked at me

Photo source: the author

Photo source: the author

About the author:

Brea Holmes is a 26 year old poet from Riverside, CA. At a young age, she had always had a passion for writing.  She created her own short stories and poems, and always enjoyed reading. Her first poetry book titled, To the Loved and Lost, is available on Amazon.

She still writes now, as a form of expression and therapy. Feel free to follow the author on Instagram @bee_the_poet.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Otherworldly Quality

“Combining ancient imagery with a contemporary surrealistic palette lends the composition an otherworldly quality that is both modern and vintage.” - the artist

One World, 2019, digital, 24 X 16, $250

One World, 2019, digital, 24 X 16, $250

I knew I wanted to be an artist since the day I was born. As a child I honed my artistic skills and as an art student I concentrated on creating works that tells a story. As a product of the Baby-Boomer generation, I found myself surrounded by iconic images of the times.

Feed Your Head, 2019, digital, 24 X 16, $250

Feed Your Head, 2019, digital, 24 X 16, $250

Recognizing all my favorite themes in the visual vocabulary of the popular culture, I jumped head-first into that world! For over 25 years, I operated my successful wholesale ceramics studio, creating hand painted Art-Pottery while raising my small family, doing laundry and feeding the dog! My ceramics were collected worldwide and over time I developed a signature style both traditional and contemporary.

Learning To Walk Again, 2019, digital, 24 X 16, $250

Learning To Walk Again, 2019, digital, 24 X 16, $250

In the late 1990s, Digital Art had become a recognizable influence in the mainstream art world. Studying the new avant-garde art form, I began manipulating images to create magical scenarios with a timeless quality. I draw my influences from vintage advertising art, antique tintype photography and the surrealist art movement. In the beginning I hand-printed transfers for decoration on my pottery, but I wanted a more diverse canvas.

She's Ready, 2019, digital, 24 X 16, $250

She's Ready, 2019, digital, 24 X 16, $250

I first introduced my Story Prints as whimsical allegories with familiar themes. Subjects like courage, wisdom and the longing to “fit in” are all grist for the mill.

Combining ancient imagery with a contemporary surrealistic palette lends the composition an otherworldly quality that is both modern and vintage.

If Not Now..when, 2019, digital, 24 X 16, $250

If Not Now..when, 2019, digital, 24 X 16, $250

I print on Metallic Pearlescent Archival paper to give it that antique, tintype feel. The medium perfectly mirrors the emotional tone of the image.

As a traditionally trained artist, I find this new art form to be limitless in possibilities. By combining the digital tools with my conventional water color renderings, it bridges the disconnect between the art world and the tech world. I think it also dissolves the boundaries between the artist and their audience.

I Got This, 2019, digital, 24 X 16, $250

I Got This, 2019, digital, 24 X 16, $250

Photo source: the artist

Photo source: the artist

About the artist:

As a product of the Baby-Boomer generation, I found myself surrounded by iconic images of the times. As a child I enjoyed the Pop Culture of my generation and as an adult, I have become an avid collector of those magical days-gone-by. In Art school, I recognized all my favorite themes in the visual vocabulary of the Pop Art movement and jumped head-first journey into that world. I enjoy the graphicness of everyday objects we take for granted, and draw my artistic influences from vintage advertising art, antique tintype photography, Pop Art and contemporary popular culture.

To view more work by the artist, please visit joannedelomba.com. You may also follow the artist on Facebook, as well as Instagram @withlovejoanne.

Obliquely Autobiographical

“…these figures, and the abstract elements they are connected to, enact stories that are obliquely autobiographical.” - the artist

Cat and Women, 2018, Inkjet print drawn in Photoshop, 12 x 12 inches, $275

Cat and Women, 2018, Inkjet print drawn in Photoshop, 12 x 12 inches, $275

Distortions of the human figure is a key element in my work. Variations of the female figure—that first landscape that we experience as we enter the world—animate most of my work.

In-studio Self-portrait, 2010, Inkjet print of original photo of me and drawing - all in Photoshop, 11 x 14 inches, $275

In-studio Self-portrait, 2010, Inkjet print of original photo of me and drawing - all in Photoshop, 11 x 14 inches, $275

[…] these figures, and the abstract elements they are connected to, enact stories that are obliquely autobiographical. They all show women being strong. Some stories are unpleasant; some are bewildering; others are full of play with line and shape.

Moo, 2010, Inkjet print made in Photoshop, 11 x 14 inches, $275

Moo, 2010, Inkjet print made in Photoshop, 11 x 14 inches, $275

Each of the images presented here is part of a narrative series. I have been a painter for decades. When I had access to Photoshop (eight years ago), this medium felt like second nature.

Feed Me, 2019, Inkjet print drawn in Photoshop, 12 x 12 inches, $275

Feed Me, 2019, Inkjet print drawn in Photoshop, 12 x 12 inches, $275

The speed with which images can be made and evolve into other images; the ability to save prior renditions while the images continue to evolve; the seemingly infinite possibilities of what can be made visible; the ephemeral nature of virtual products, and the easy storage—all of these qualities inherent in working digitally are exciting and stimulating.

Piercing the Ceiling, 2019, Inkjet print drawn in Photoshop, 12 x 12 inches, $275

Piercing the Ceiling, 2019, Inkjet print drawn in Photoshop, 12 x 12 inches, $275

Photo source: the artist

Photo source: the artist

About the artist:

Carol Radsprecher is a restless artist whose images combine figurative and abstract elements. She earned her MFA in painting from Hunter College, CUNY. A longtime painter, she discovered the wonders of digital image-making and found that media well-suited to her need to make a succession of rapidly evolving, narrative images based on distorted representations of the human body, especially the female body. Her work has appeared in several solo shows and numerous group shows, and has been published in print and online publications.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.carolradsprecher.com. You may also follow the artist on Instagram @cradsprecher.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

HY•ST•ER•IA

“The term hysteria comes from the Greek word “hysterika”, meaning Uterus. In ancient Greece it was believed that a wandering and discontented Uterus was blamed for that dreaded female ailment of excessive emotion, hysteria.” Source: Hysteria and the Wandering Womb

Memory of an Extinct Anatomy, 2018, archival pigment print, 11 x 14, $500

Memory of an Extinct Anatomy, 2018, archival pigment print, 11 x 14, $500

I was diagnosed with Stage 1 endometrial cancer and had to undergo a complete hysterectomy. I embarked upon this series in an attempt to fathom and artistically represent the emotional and physical changes that my body is going through.

Fall Risk, 2018, archival pigment print, 11 x 14, $500

Fall Risk, 2018, archival pigment print, 11 x 14, $500

The dress is the center stage upon which my drama unfolds and speaks to my sense of a lost femininity due to the loss of my womb. Symbols from a tarot card reading done prior to the procedure refer to my surgery and psychological response.

A Hard Stick, 2018, archival pigment print, 11 x 14, $500

A Hard Stick, 2018, archival pigment print, 11 x 14, $500

Photographs of my body, medical procedures, and human conflict are some of the actors in my performance.

Throwing The Bones, 2018, archival pigment print, 11 x 14, $500

Throwing The Bones, 2018, archival pigment print, 11 x 14, $500

I use a variation on the antiquarian lumen printing process to obtain the images of the dresses. The original lumen process used plant material placed on photosensitive paper and exposed by the sun.

My Rapture, 2018, archival pigment print, 11 x 14, $500

My Rapture, 2018, archival pigment print, 11 x 14, $500

For this work I place baby dresses onto black and white photo paper and place this outdoors for the sun to expose so I can obtain the numinous haint-blue ghost like images. I then combine these dresses with other photographic methods to obtain the final images.

Four Out Of Five, 2018, archival pigment print, 11 x 14, $500

Four Out Of Five, 2018, archival pigment print, 11 x 14, $500

About the artist:

Diane Fenster's art first received notice during the era of early experimentations with digital imaging. Her work has been called an important voice in the development of a true digital aesthetic. She views herself as an alchemist, using digital tools to delve into fundamental human issues. Her work is literary and emotional, full of symbolism and multiple layers of meaning. Her images have appeared in numerous publications on digital art. She has been guest lecturer at many seminars and conferences, her work has been internationally exhibited and is part of museum, corporate and private collections. Her images appear in numerous publications on digital art including the APERTURE monograph METAMORPHOSES: PHOTOGRAPHY IN THE ELECTRONIC AGE, WOMEN, ART AND TECHNOLOGY published by MIT press, and ART IN THE DIGITAL AGE edited by Bruce Wands, School of Visual Art, NYC.

She is now exploring starker imagery that has its roots in alternative process, image transfer and photo-encaustic. Moscow Photo Awards, Honorable Mention for the What We Leave Behind series. Silver Award, Tokyo International Foto Awards for HY•ST•ER•IA: Body as Battleground. 12TH Julia Margaret Cameron Awards-Honorable Mentions in the series categories for Fine Art and Digital Manipulation for images from the series HY•ST•ER•IA: Body as Battleground. 2018 Pollux Awards, Finalist in the Fine Art and Digital Manipulation categories for series HY•ST•ER•IA: Body as Battleground. Her work was exhibited in the 4th Biennale of Fine Art and Documentary Photography in Berlin, she received Honorable Mentions in the 9th Pollux Awards, 7th, 8th, 11th and 12th Julia Margaret Cameron Awards and the Moscow Photo Awards, included in the Alternative Process exhibit juried by Christopher James at the Texas Photo Society and published in the DIFFUSION ANNUAL 2016. Diane Fenster and the Wandering Womb (Hysteria series) was recently published in Harvard's OD REVIEW. Also published in WOTISART Magazine, HEALTH AND HEALING, Femme Fotale Volume VI, and UNDEREXPOSED MAGAZINE. Hysteria images were selected for the National Photography Competition-Developed Work at the Midwest Center for Photography. Her work will appear in the upcoming DIFFUSION X journal.She continues to be included in many exhibits in museums and galleries both in the USA and abroad.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.lensculture.com/diane-fenster. You may also follow the artist on Facebook at www.facebook.com/dianefensterphotography, as well as Instagram @dianefenster.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Moments

a collection of poetry

by Raven Stares

Moments

I hold a lifetime of moments

At the bottom of this bottle.

Watch me drink

with disdain

feel the whisky hit

the inside of my flesh

and then reach

for the bottle

again.

 

Seed

You are stronger

than you’ll ever know.

A seed must fall to the ground,

Before it can start to grow.

 

Wave

There is

no ocean

deeper

than you.

 

I drown

when I

sea your

wave

come through.

About the author:

Raven Stares is a poet residing in the United Kingdom. She likes to ponder the complexities of life and lay them in words. “I write I feel as though I have spread my wings, and I could be anywhere in the world.” - the author

To read more work by the author, please follow on Instagram @ravenstarespoetry.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Perfectly Unplanned

“I photograph people, I photograph buildings. Anything that catches my eye really.” - the artist

Illuminated Building, 2019, Photograph, 4.8M, $TBC

Illuminated Building, 2019, Photograph, 4.8M, $TBC

People are so obsessed with the 'beauty' they see on their phones and TV's. The world is so damn interesting, infinitely more so than what's on screen. Through my work, I hope to capture those 'perfectly unplanned' moments in life.

This collection is part of a 12 - 16 piece series. I shot these with a Contax T2 and Portra 400 film. Through a mixture of architectural shapes and fascinating people I aimed to show how animated the world can be - with or without people.

Man on Texture, 2019, Photograph, 4.2MB, $TBC

Man on Texture, 2019, Photograph, 4.2MB, $TBC

About the artist:

Jamie Espinosa is a portrait and street photographer from Sydney, Australia. He shoots most of his work on a Mamiya 645 and Contax T2 and his preferred film is Kodak Portra 400.

To view more work by the artist, please visit https://www.facebook.com/jamie.espinosa.3.www.facebook.com/jamie.espinosa.3. You may also follow the artist on Instagram @jlouislouis.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Hyper Realism

“I find that my identity is literally submerged in the beauty, colors and concept of hyper realism and how I can incorporate water and/or superimposition.” - the artist

In His Image, 2019, soft pastels, 16 x 32 inches, $1200

In His Image, 2019, soft pastels, 16 x 32 inches, $1200

My artistic goal has always been for my art to be an expression that, hopefully, invokes emotion within the viewer. My inspiration comes from personal observations.

Up For More, 2018, soft pastels, 18 x 24 inches, $1800

Up For More, 2018, soft pastels, 18 x 24 inches, $1800

As I strive to best represent my own personal character, my mission is to illustrate the beauty of God around us as it is reflected in the presence of water or other images.

Depths of Faith in Things Unseen, 2019, soft pastels, 16 x 16 inches, $1100

Depths of Faith in Things Unseen, 2019, soft pastels, 16 x 16 inches, $1100

But my identity lives outside of that which hyper realism can create, but in what can intensify and thrive within the very rapid heartbeat of color and its infinite spectrum of vibrancy. Color can help to facilitate and fulfill some very basic human needs.

Drinking Time, 2019, soft pastels, 16 x 16 inches, $700

Drinking Time, 2019, soft pastels, 16 x 16 inches, $700

Color can identify and specify necessary objects for survival and/or enjoyment; stimulate and work synergistic-ally with all the senses; mark territory and manage personal space; symbolize abstract concepts and thoughts; express fantasy and wish; create illusions and ambiance; emphasize or camouflage figures or objects; enhance self-image and personal esteem; produce an aesthetic response.

Festival, 2018, soft pastels, 16 x 16 inches, $900

Festival, 2018, soft pastels, 16 x 16 inches, $900

Most important, the use and arrangement of color enables us to create beauty and harmony and express our personal taste, by doing so, provide us with a sense of accomplishment.

Wild at Play, 2019, soft pastels, 24 x 36 inches, $3200

Wild at Play, 2019, soft pastels, 24 x 36 inches, $3200

About the artist:

J. Howard has always been an artist. Her artistic journey began when she was a child in Houston, Texas, showing an early talent for drawing and painting. In graduate school she studied animated art and the mechanics of visually aided learning while working in the graphics and film industries. She is acclaimed for her vitality of colors, strength of composition and variety of subject matter. She creates vivid animated characteristics using the hyper realistic styling developed in the 1960’s combined with superimposition.

Howard was selected as a permanent member of the Southern Artist Group in 2016. She was one of 10 women chosen for a national show at the Custom House Museum in Clarksville, TN.She is the recipient of numerous top awards, including Hunting Art Prize Top Finalist receiving a Purchase Award,, National Emerging Artist 2017, International Photorealist 2017, Best Of Show Cowboy True 2017, 5 time American Art Award 2017, ACA Gallery Award and Purchase Award 2017, Western Art Rodeo Association 2018, Western Art Rodeo Gallery Award 2018,, and Platform Artist of the Year Finalist. Her solo exhibitions in galleries and museums include Showing Off at the Factory Gallery 2016, solo exhibit Emerging Artist 2017 St. Charles, a one-person retrospective in pastel paintings at the Saulsbury Gallery in 2017, Western Art Museum Kerrville Featured Artist 2019, Gift of the Arts Featured Artists Ann Arbor 2019, NAVE Museum of Art Resident Artist in 2020, and a retrospective of graphic expression in pastels at the Custom House Museum in 2020.

Widely published in books and magazines nationally and internationally, which include Art Reveal, Art Ascent, Art Quench and Pastel Art, J. Howard originals are also represented in many corporate and private collections. Her work ranges in size from small 6 x 6 inches to 36 x 50 inches.

To view more work by the artist, please visit organicpastels.com. You may also follow the artist on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/docjhoward, as well as Instagram @organicpastels.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Playing for Change

Two Poems

by Barry Plamondon

Playing for Change

 

Man sitting in front of the station, guitar in hand

There's a cap on the ground cardboard sign beside it

‘Playing For Change’ the sign says, the man softly strums

A few people throw coins , not many, still he plays on

Eventually a man in a three piece suit stops, he seems angry

“So you need some change to support your habit?” he asks

“No” replies the guitar player, “I’ve been clean and sober five years now”

“Everything I make goes to the battered woman’s shelter”

“They’re the ones that make the change”

“I’m sorry” mutters the guy in the suit and walks away

The guitar player starts another song ,he’s playing for change...

A Message in a Bottle

Across the sea the bottle did float

Contained within it a simple note

How it braved the waves, gales, and more

To at last wash up on a distant shore

Where a little girl holding her Daddy’s hand

Saw it laying there, all shiny in the sand

“Can we open it please Daddy” she pleaded

Dad smiled, no further words were needed

Her father opened the bottle, took out the note

One which someone from far away had wrote

“What does it say Daddy?” she asked, sneaking a peek

Dad stood there, a single tear rolling down his cheek

“Well, what does it say Daddy?” she asked again

He thought a second, “Peace on earth for all...Amen”

About the author:

Barry Plamondon is a published author and gardening enthusiast living with family in Greater Vancouver, Canada. He holds a diploma in Practical Horticulture from B.C.I.T, attended U.B.C in Arts for 3 years and is currently in his 4th year Arts at Thompson River University. He has authored eight books of poetry, has been included in several anthologies, is an administrator at the Facebook site A Poet’s Diary, is a member of The Holy Wow Poets in Maple Ridge and has appeared on the radio show, World Poetry Cafe.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Light & Silver

“…creating a link between the past and the present.” - the artist

Untitled I, 2017, silver gelatin print and unique, 40 x 50 cm, 2000€

Untitled I, 2017, silver gelatin print and unique, 40 x 50 cm, 2000€

In my photographic series “Light & Silver” I am travelling in time creating a link between the past and the present. In this series I try to engage in a conversation with history creating psychological and philosophical portraits - and it is my way of celebrating life dealing with history, memory and imagination.

Untitled II, 2017, silver gelatin print and unique, 40 x 50 cm, 2000€

Untitled II, 2017, silver gelatin print and unique, 40 x 50 cm, 2000€

In my series, I am searching for traces of and investigating the Argentine History in search of some of my origins. I embarked on a journey leading me to Buenos Aires where I found some old photographs from the beginning of the 20th century in a flea market. I rephotographed and recreated the photographs by making interventions.

Untitled III, 2017, silver gelatin print and unique, 40 x 50 cm, 2000€

Untitled III, 2017, silver gelatin print and unique, 40 x 50 cm, 2000€

In this way my work is situated on the threshold between the past and the present, imagination and reality. I focus on the hidden and poetic history of a place and a person. I try to reveal the different layers of history, mythology and the present, to create a narrative image, a sort of visual archaeology, at times blending or colliding with imminent social and political realities.

Untitled IV, 2017, silver gelatin print and unique, 40 x 50 cm, 2000€

Untitled IV, 2017, silver gelatin print and unique, 40 x 50 cm, 2000€

I work with analogue photographs using a large amount of time in the darkroom developing the rephotographed photographs. I am creating a personal bond with them pretending that I have taken the photographs – that I have been making these portraits. Central to my work with memory and history are also the disappearance and reappearance of a past moment in the analogue process.

Untitled V, 2017, silver gelatin print and unique, 40 x 50 cm, 2000€

Untitled V, 2017, silver gelatin print and unique, 40 x 50 cm, 2000€

Afterwards, I reconstruct the images by making interventions adding flowers to the images thus underlining the connection between the past and the present. These are works that carry traces of my hand and of time passing. It is a process of transformation and a movement in time and memory.

Untitled VI, 2017, silver gelatin print and unique, 40 x 50 cm, 2000€

Untitled VI, 2017, silver gelatin print and unique, 40 x 50 cm, 2000€

About the artist:

Fie Tanderup is a photographer and artist living in Denmark. She was educated at L’École Nationale Superieure des Beaux Arts, in Paris; and The Jutland Academy of Fine Arts, in Denmark. Her work is constantly circling around photography.

“Photography is more than just an imprint light it is also a movement through space, in which the past and the present melt together luring the viewer with a promise of presence and transformation, an encounter with something else.” - the artist

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.fietanderup.com. You may also follow the artist on Facebook at www.facebook.com/fie.tanderup, as well as Instagram @fietanderup.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Human Activity and The Natural World

“The content of my images is inspired by the interchange between human activity and the natural world, where each cyclically affects the other.” - the artist

Boxing With God, 2019, Photography, 10 x 7.5, $500

Boxing With God, 2019, Photography, 10 x 7.5, $500

Having a camera with me throughout the day, whether my DSLR or my smart phone, tends to make me vividly aware of my surroundings in ways I am ordinarily not. On my daily rounds, I am drawn to the things we usually take for granted or overlook: shadows, glare, detritus, reflections, scarred surfaces, the view out the window. The content of my images is inspired by the interchange between human activity and the natural world, where each cyclically affects the other. On some days, I end up with a series of photos of similar content. On others, I simply have a narrative of the campus of my travels.

Infrastructure, 2019, Photography, 20.25 x 27, $750

Infrastructure, 2019, Photography, 20.25 x 27, $750

There is little forethought to my process, though I find robust subjects and themes that run through my work. I try to compose each shot as I take it, and manipulate the image later. The origins of the images included in this submission are as assorted as one might imagine. Elevator walls, cracks in linoleum, rivulets of ice, dirty windows, rusted porch furniture, and dew-covered playground equipment are among the motley sources that I find on my daily parade.

Waiting For Ice Cream, 2019, Photography, 12 x 9, $500

Waiting For Ice Cream, 2019, Photography, 12 x 9, $500

Focusing on the brain's often-deceitful role in how we perceive things, I regularly over-saturate color and distort various elements of my original images in order to draw attention to and dramatize the textures, topographies, contours, and hues of my subjects. I take the privilege of altering that that has already been altered, thus participating more directly in the cycle of nature/human exchange. The painterly result is more heightened and enigmatic than the “reality” implied in the original photographs.

Wolf Moon Over Mt. Olympus, 2019, Photography, 24 x 18, $600

Wolf Moon Over Mt. Olympus, 2019, Photography, 24 x 18, $600

My career is as varied and random as my subject matter. I spent nearly five decades in acting and sound design for theater and film; playing, writing and recording music; creating music videos; recording soundtracks for radio, television, films, theater pieces, dance projects, and museum installations. I have spent the subsequent 15 years working with children, often involving them in the art forms mentioned. Photography is the way I now create art.

The Inner Life of Trees, 2019, Photography, 20.25 x 27, $750

The Inner Life of Trees, 2019, Photography, 20.25 x 27, $750

As may be inferred from my work, my tastes are eclectic. I am stimulated by the work of a variety of artists from different eras, areas, art forms, and genres. Inspired by these vibrant creators and their art, I hope that my own vision equally heartens others — to stop and look along the way; to more closely regard the beauty of our surroundings and our involvement in them; and to contemplate our own place in a kaleidoscopic, microscopic universe.

Cosmic Raspberry, 2019, Photography, 18 x 24, $600

Cosmic Raspberry, 2019, Photography, 18 x 24, $600

Photo source: the artist

Photo source: the artist

About the artist:

Brian Hallas is a photographer, filmmaker, sound designer, songwriter, and educator. He has been involved with the theater since the third grade, and as a sound designer and performer, he’s been an associate of National Medal of the Arts recipient Ping Chong since 1983. Brian began to adopt photography as a serious medium for exploration and expression upon becoming a schoolteacher, where economy of effort to achieve maximum effect is one of the keys to survival. The daily rituals of taking, processing and posting his photographs are an oasis of creativity in a very troubled era. As one of the multitudes of perks afforded by a life in the Arts, Brian has especially been fortunate to have dined contentedly in many parts of the world where he otherwise would never have dined.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.thenursery.com. You may also follow the artist n Facebook at www.facebook.com/brian.hallas.9, as well as Instagram @bhallas0909.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

It Listens Sometimes

It Listens Sometimes

a poem by Diego Vela

 

Splendid Vision, 2019, Photo Collage, 12 x 15 inches, $600

Splendid Vision, 2019, Photo Collage, 12 x 15 inches, $600

“But, I worship the ground that you tread upon,

I adore you, if you will.”

Says the sensitive child to the

one rolling it’s eyes.

-Quick inhale…slowly…breathing,

waking waking…-

In a dream…

we wake alone in tender rooms.

In one that is far away

my tiny green deer stares at you

Stares at you, while you sleep

I left it in your room

the last time I visited

It insisted,

and I can’t change it’s mind

once it settles on it!

He set His foot down,

His hoof down!

“It is unacceptable!” It cries to me,

and asked to speak to a manager.

I am the manager I said, and it smiled

with batty eyes and a cheeky grin.

It visits my dreams

it reports the reports

it calls you a spoiled boyfriend

I tell it that you don’t

like that word

“Fine,” it sneers,

“friend then” it exhales,

rolling its deer eyes and

playing dead

sticking out its tongue.

“You’re exhausting…” it coos

as it lays on the ground

made of my hand

and stares at me

waiting for concede

my concede

to give it credence.

Its bristly skin twitches in spots

its dangled black tongue limp and soft

hangs from its mouth

it trembles and plays dead

more dramatically

its long tongue dry and fat!

It baas,

“spoiled

ungrateful

and a cruel liar!”

Stopping with a jolt of erectness…

“There is a noise…”

IT Baas, like a sheep

No, it cries like a goat

a frightened goat.

I bury you deep.

to hide and protect

us.

The tiny green deer

sitting up

spooked..

ears search,

green fur twitch,

raw head snap,

eyeballs roll,

all scanning! Scanning around…

“Where are you?!”…

it calls to me

with a tremble

many trembles.

Go back deer

Go back dear

Go back…

I say

There is a constant hum

under the noise…

the noise of the world

deep under the ground

under

consciousness

where I can find you

where you can find me

waiting, wanting and listening.

About the author:

My poetry is very dear to me because it tends to be a sonic representation, and letters on a page that meet up to represent my visual artwork in a different way.

I was born in Texas, now living in New York City, via London. I graduated from, or rather survived, a private southern Baptist university in a tiny Texas town. Learning much about myself, my world and a little about art. Most of my “Learned” skill comes from just delving into new mediums to satisfy the compulsion to create.

To view the author’s art, please visit www.diegovela.com, as well as Instagram @diegodiablovela.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

After the Scream

After the Scream

a poem by Paula

Knowing Seeing Feeling Through the Ether Detail 2, Aug 2019, Photo Collage, 12 x 15 inches, $600

Knowing Seeing Feeling Through the Ether Detail 2, Aug 2019, Photo Collage, 12 x 15 inches, $600

After the scream,

there is always a swallow

the god-mouth devouring

of these calcified remains

and what is left, then, but silence.

The birds, too, have fled.

their nests now dust-hovel shallows

in an endless, barren winter.

The quiet place is not as I had imagined -

I am not made whole in your absence;

there is just space.

And, still,

so much time to waste.

- pklg -

To view more work by the author, please visit Instagram @rainingalloverthesky.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.