It Listens Sometimes

It Listens Sometimes

a poem by Diego Vela

 

Splendid Vision, 2019, Photo Collage, 12 x 15 inches, $600

Splendid Vision, 2019, Photo Collage, 12 x 15 inches, $600

“But, I worship the ground that you tread upon,

I adore you, if you will.”

Says the sensitive child to the

one rolling it’s eyes.

-Quick inhale…slowly…breathing,

waking waking…-

In a dream…

we wake alone in tender rooms.

In one that is far away

my tiny green deer stares at you

Stares at you, while you sleep

I left it in your room

the last time I visited

It insisted,

and I can’t change it’s mind

once it settles on it!

He set His foot down,

His hoof down!

“It is unacceptable!” It cries to me,

and asked to speak to a manager.

I am the manager I said, and it smiled

with batty eyes and a cheeky grin.

It visits my dreams

it reports the reports

it calls you a spoiled boyfriend

I tell it that you don’t

like that word

“Fine,” it sneers,

“friend then” it exhales,

rolling its deer eyes and

playing dead

sticking out its tongue.

“You’re exhausting…” it coos

as it lays on the ground

made of my hand

and stares at me

waiting for concede

my concede

to give it credence.

Its bristly skin twitches in spots

its dangled black tongue limp and soft

hangs from its mouth

it trembles and plays dead

more dramatically

its long tongue dry and fat!

It baas,

“spoiled

ungrateful

and a cruel liar!”

Stopping with a jolt of erectness…

“There is a noise…”

IT Baas, like a sheep

No, it cries like a goat

a frightened goat.

I bury you deep.

to hide and protect

us.

The tiny green deer

sitting up

spooked..

ears search,

green fur twitch,

raw head snap,

eyeballs roll,

all scanning! Scanning around…

“Where are you?!”…

it calls to me

with a tremble

many trembles.

Go back deer

Go back dear

Go back…

I say

There is a constant hum

under the noise…

the noise of the world

deep under the ground

under

consciousness

where I can find you

where you can find me

waiting, wanting and listening.

About the author:

My poetry is very dear to me because it tends to be a sonic representation, and letters on a page that meet up to represent my visual artwork in a different way.

I was born in Texas, now living in New York City, via London. I graduated from, or rather survived, a private southern Baptist university in a tiny Texas town. Learning much about myself, my world and a little about art. Most of my “Learned” skill comes from just delving into new mediums to satisfy the compulsion to create.

To view the author’s art, please visit www.diegovela.com, as well as Instagram @diegodiablovela.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

After the Scream

After the Scream

a poem by Paula

Knowing Seeing Feeling Through the Ether Detail 2, Aug 2019, Photo Collage, 12 x 15 inches, $600

Knowing Seeing Feeling Through the Ether Detail 2, Aug 2019, Photo Collage, 12 x 15 inches, $600

After the scream,

there is always a swallow

the god-mouth devouring

of these calcified remains

and what is left, then, but silence.

The birds, too, have fled.

their nests now dust-hovel shallows

in an endless, barren winter.

The quiet place is not as I had imagined -

I am not made whole in your absence;

there is just space.

And, still,

so much time to waste.

- pklg -

To view more work by the author, please visit Instagram @rainingalloverthesky.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Repetition

“I believe the purpose of art is to help us to deal with who we are. Making art is about the reflective process, be it conscious or subconscious.” - the artist

Haven, 2018, marker pen on rice paper, 90 cm x 120 cm, 9800

Haven, 2018, marker pen on rice paper, 90 cm x 120 cm, 9800

Over time, art has evolved in many ways - in styles and forms with stories told and messages conveyed. I believe the purpose of art is to help us to deal with who we are. Making art is about the reflective process, be it conscious or subconscious. We cannot live in a society without art, for art is closely related to every aspect of life - personal, psychological and contextual.

Perspectives, 2016, marker pen on rice paper, 83 cm x 153 cm, 7800

Perspectives, 2016, marker pen on rice paper, 83 cm x 153 cm, 7800

When we actualize art by translating the smallest thoughts into visuals or artistic processes, it helps us to externalize our emotions, allowing us to become self-aware and mindful. This benefits us physically and mentally.

Summit, 2017, marker pen on rice paper, 50 cm x 50 cm, 2800

Summit, 2017, marker pen on rice paper, 50 cm x 50 cm, 2800

In creating this body of work, I began to align my senses with the nature, my thoughts with the culture, and my inner self with the soul.

Journey, 2017, marker pen on silk, 94 cm x 115 cm, 6800

Journey, 2017, marker pen on silk, 94 cm x 115 cm, 6800

The selection is especially considered to share the artist’s journey from the beginning of meditating the changes happened in our cities and natural orders over time, to the latest contemplative state of mind which results from the informative mark-making process using “repetition” with a single material and stroke.v

Starry Night, 2017, marker pen on rice paper, 170 cm x 230 cm, 9900

Starry Night, 2017, marker pen on rice paper, 170 cm x 230 cm, 9900

From the City Meditation series where nature and architecture are drawn as recognizable visual forms, the mark-making process has gradually lead the artist and the material to where and how it should be, without the need to sketch the designs or have a theme to work on, and eventually abandoned any representational subjects.

Flight 2, 2016, marker pen on rice paper, 67 cm x 137 cm, 4800

Flight 2, 2016, marker pen on rice paper, 67 cm x 137 cm, 4800

Art is about the honesty of material from constant negotiation in the process, the peace that the artist enjoyed in the obsession and indulgent, and the power of repetition to transcend our mindfulness in the presence.

About the artist:

A former architect in Hong Kong, Yoko relocated to Singapore in 2013 to pursue professional advancement in fine art and art therapy. Yoko is a multi-disciplinary artist, she uses different art forms and materials to explore and reflect on human experiences and societal issues. Her latest series of work focuses on repetitive mark-making exploring the subconscious human psyche in search of deep reflections between the known and the unknown. Yoko is also practicing as an art therapist since graduated with a Master of Art Therapy in LASALLE College of the Arts in 2019.

She is actively involved in community work and social action projects through art therapy, art workshops, artist’s talks and teaching work with a diverse population and settings including those with special needs, physical challenges, cancer, chronic diseases, depression and more, with hospitals, schools, rehabilitation centers, arts and cultural partners.

Yoko receives an Honorable Mention in the Art Exhibition in conjunction with the 36th International Dream Conference in the Netherlands. She is the winner of the 2016 UOB Painting of the Year, Most Promising Artist in Singapore. She received the 2016 Best Graduate Award with a Diploma of Fine Arts at Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts in Singapore, an Executive Committee Award in the 1st International Olympia Art Competition in Japan in 2015 and a finalist award in Bazaar Art Prize in Singapore in 2015. Yoko’s artwork has been exhibited in group and solo exhibitions such as Art Stage Singapore 2017, UOB Art Space 2017 in Hong Kong, UOB Solo Art Showcase in 2017, Singaplural 2015 & 2016, NUSS and Art Apart Fair, just to name a few.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.facebook.com/YokoChoiArtPage. You may aalso follow the artist on Instagram @yokochoi0218.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

New Layers of Growth

“I explore at how we find beauty, value and purpose in things that are old or discarded.” - the artist

Calypso 2 (2018) mixed media sculpture, 5 x 5 x 13 cm, £95 (also available as an art photo poster in A2 & A3)

Calypso 2 (2018) mixed media sculpture, 5 x 5 x 13 cm, £95 (also available as an art photo poster in A2 & A3)

Q: What led you to become a sculpture artist?

A: It’s been a long journey via the scenic route. I have always liked making things. I originally trained in Theatre Design. As well as the theoretical design side, the course covered many practical skills in model making, costume and prop construction in a variety of materials. Following college I worked freelance as a designer, scenic painter and prop maker in theatre, film and tv. After 4 years as Head of Design for Manchester Youth Theatre, I moved more and more into community arts but not just community theatre. I became co-creative director of street theatre company, Aqueous Humour, designing both professional and community projects with a particular focus on masks making and puppets.

Theatre design is about helping the audience to understand the message of the performance through visual clues and in community arts, I help people to express their voice and message creatively. It was though my community arts practice, that I reconnected with my love of textiles and fibre art and a desire to develop personal artwork. This took me back to college and I graduated in MA Textile Practice from Manchester School of Art in 2018. Over the MA I explored combining my interest in textiles with my prop making skills to create three dimensional textile sculpture. When I left school, I didn’t have a message of my own but now I do.

Green Sprawl (2019), Textiles, 28 x 28 x 3 cm, £425

Green Sprawl (2019), Textiles, 28 x 28 x 3 cm, £425

Q: What inspires your subject matter?

 A: Through the creation of three-dimensional textiles, I explore at how we find beauty, value and purpose in things that are old or discarded. I investigate ageing and how things change appearance and shape over time, not just eroding or decaying but new layers of growth, giving interesting juxtapositions of structure and colour.

I have a longstanding obsession with the tones & textures of the seashore having moved from Manchester to Pittenweem, a village on the coast of Fife, at the age of 8. I love beachcombing and return from holidays back at my Mum’s with shells & rocks, twisted dried seaweed & old nylon rope from the fishing boats. My holiday photos have more pictures of rocks & seaweed than of my family. I particularly love layers and juxtapositions of structure and colour: I love the sedimentary rocks shaped by millennia of life by the sea, dappled with lichen, coated with patches of seaweed and colonies of limpets & barnacles; I love barnacles and how they cluster on other shells & discarded manmade objects; I love the flashes of orange & turquoise as old fishing rope & nets peak through the sand having been washed up & buried.

Two Green Bottles, 2019, mixed media sculpture, 21 x 9 x 3 and 21 x 9 x 4 cm - £125 each

Two Green Bottles, 2019, mixed media sculpture, 21 x 9 x 3 and 21 x 9 x 4 cm - £125 each

Q: Can you describe the materials you use and your creative process?

A: I am rather obsessed with waste both as inspiration and the materials I use. I use old clothes and scrap materials within my work for economic & ecological sustainability, choosing fabrics that hold some significance or connection to the work.

In the “Beached” series, I have used old suiting as my base, symbolising how it is our disposable urban lifestyles that are impacting on our coasts. I was drawn to the racks of grey in the charity shop like layers of rock. When our jeans become tatty, we find them a new purpose like gardening but office wear is just discarded. I choose woven fabrics, wool blends if I am lucky, with more than one tone as this reacts well in the embellisher, exaggerating the texture. I combine these with other old clothes, blending a variety of different colours and weights to achieve my target texture. I also dye old cottons with garden and kitchen waste to add to my palette. I use both machine and hand embroidery to add detail to the surface.

I stitch the textiles inside the litter prior to casting. As I use actual litter rather than making moulds, each piece is unique. I try to leave logos and symbols revealed as these are then captured by the concrete, leaving reminders of the origin of that waste to connect the viewer to piece more deeply.

The casts are natural in size but I also stage photographs of them. Using large scale photographs printed on advertising board, I like to play with material, scale and presentation to give this waste a greater physical and psychological presence that mirrors the seriousness of the ecological catastrophe we are creating with them. A coke bottle becomes an impossibly solid, gravity defying Zeppelin and a Calypso juice box looms up like a post-Apocalyptic tower block with no doors or windows - revealing the disconnect between the allure of the objects and the harm they cause.

Message in a Bottle, 2019, mixed media sculpture, 21 x 9 x 3, £125

Message in a Bottle, 2019, mixed media sculpture, 21 x 9 x 3, £125

Q: We were impressed with your Best in Show piece, titled Message in a Bottle, as well as the rest of the collection you submitted. Tell us more about this piece/series.

The “Beached” series highlights the issue of plastic pollution. As well referring to the coast, the term “Beached” refers to that which is washed up, discarded or left behind. It invites us to consider the packaging that we use and discard on a daily basis; objects such as drinks bottles, styrofoam cups and food wrappers that are so lightweight and seem so insignificant that we barely notice them. Casting concrete in actual litter transforms them into solid pieces with weight in line with the importance of this environmental issue.

The incorporation of detailed embroidery touches upon the way our waste becomes subsumed into the natural world around us. However, the pretty, colourful lichens, seaweed and molluscs fail to obliterate the hulking, grey, concrete bottles that peer out from beneath them. The damage we are causing to planet earth and ourselves may be hidden but it is there nevertheless and needs our immediate attention. Once plastic has made the journey to the coast sometimes, without looking closely, it can be difficult to distinguish the manmade from the natural but this does not diminish the damage it is causing as coastal wildlife are dying with stomachs filled with plastic as they mistake it for food.

Soft Green Wall (2019) Textiles, 20 x 20 x 2 cm, £225

Soft Green Wall (2019) Textiles, 20 x 20 x 2 cm, £225

Q: What do you hope for viewers to take away from your art?

I want to encourage the viewer to stop and look closer; to consider the beauty, value and purpose in the old and discarded through my photography and three-dimensional textiles. Hopefully “Beached” might get people to understand the permanence of these disposable everyday items and start to make different choices in their daily lives: simple things like reusable cups and water bottles or even just putting them in the recycling rather than the bin or the ground.

Sometimes I photograph the litter where I find it. I chose to return some resulting work to their point of origin and re-photograph to highlight the value of those things that could have been recycled and the permanence of those that cannot. As these are public places, sometimes people question me when I return to stage the ‘after’ photographs and it has been good to take a moment to engage in conversations regarding the litter: who left it and why, the effects on our planet but also just our community.

 

Coffee Break (2018) mixed media sculpture

Coffee Break (2018) mixed media sculpture

Q: How do you view your art career in five years?

A: In the past 5 years, the focus of my art career has changed dramatically. Through building a home studio and doing an MA, I have made the move from performance design into visual arts. Over the next 5 years, I hope to increase my profile as an artist and that more people will approach me to exhibit or to buy my work rather than just responding to call outs. I was proud to be selected to join Prism Contemporary Textiles Collective and would like to join other collectives to link with other artists in a supportive network as well as the exhibition opportunities this brings. Although I love my home studio, I do often feel isolated and out of the loop, so as my children move into high school and my work is not constrained by the school run, I hope to become part of a professional studio once more. The community side of my art career is still very important to me and I hope as my profile grows, that this will bring greater opportunities for community projects and public works exploring social, environmental and heritage issues.

 

Photo credit: the artist

Photo credit: the artist

About the artist:

Nerissa Cargill Thompson encourages the viewer to stop and look closer; to consider the beauty, value and purpose in the old and discarded through photography and three-dimensional textiles. Her work investigates how things change appearance & shape over time, not just eroding or decaying but also new layers of growth, giving interesting juxtapositions of structure and colour. She uses old clothes and scrap materials within her work for economic & ecological sustainability, choosing fabrics that hold some significance or connection to the work.

The artist invites us to consider the packaging that we use and discard on a daily basis; objects such as drinks bottles that are so lightweight and seem so insignificant that we barely notice them. Casting concrete in actual litter to give this waste a greater physical and psychological presence that mirrors the seriousness of the ecological catastrophe we are creating with them

Cargill Thompson’s incorporation of detailed embroidery touches upon the way our waste becomes subsumed into the natural world around us. However, the pretty, colourful lichens, seaweed and molluscs fail to obliterate the hulking, grey, concrete bottles that peer out from beneath them. The damage we are causing to planet earth and ourselves may be hidden but it is there nevertheless and needs our immediate attention.

Designer, maker and facilitator with over 20 years experience of professional and community practice. Originally trained in Theatre Design but through her community arts practice, her interest in fibre art grew and a desire to develop personal artwork. Recent graduate in MA Textile Practice from Manchester School of Art. She is a member of Prism Contemporary Textiles Collective.

Solo exhibitions: Beached (Art in Windows, Liverpool), TIME, Arc Centre (Stockport) with accompanying textile workshops. Recent group exhibitions: Fragility - Prism Collective (Hoxton Arches, London), Micro (AIR Gallery, Altrincham), Take Flight (MA exhibition Manchester School of Art), Thoughtful Planet 2 (Thought Foundation, Birtley), London Road Project (Plant NOMA, Manchester), Loss/Inheritance (Manchester Craft & Design Centre), Thresholds: The Adjacent Possible (Tapestry, Liverpool), Blowing a Gail (Old Town House, Warrington).

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.nerissact.co.uk. You may also follow the artist on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nerissact, as well as Instagram @nerissact.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Color First

“I love mixing colors and creating new color palettes.” - the artist

Encore, 2019, acrylic, marker, pencil and hand-painted paper on canvas, 12 x 12 x 1.5 inches

Encore, 2019, acrylic, marker, pencil and hand-painted paper on canvas, 12 x 12 x 1.5 inches

Q: What led you to become a mixed media artist?

A: In my “pre-canvas” studies, I use various media such as pencil, ink, watercolor and marker — even paper fragments of old studies. This is how I began experimenting with hand-painted paper elements in my acrylic paintings. Still, I’d say I’m a painter who uses several mediums in some of my acrylic paintings.

Moment of Flight, 2019, acrylic, 20 x 16 x 1.5 inches, $450

Moment of Flight, 2019, acrylic, 20 x 16 x 1.5 inches, $450

Q: What inspires your subject matter?

A: Color first. I love mixing colors and creating new color palettes. My paintings then become explorations of color and texture, line and space. Sources of inspiration for my color studies are photo images — aerial landscapes, urban structures, geographic earth patterns, nature.

Double Red Crossings, 2018, acrylic and mixed media, 24 x 24 inches, $495

Double Red Crossings, 2018, acrylic and mixed media, 24 x 24 inches, $495

Q: Can you describe the materials you use and your creative process?

A: My primary medium is acrylic paint, inks and mediums. I also use graphite and color pencils and markers to create areas of structure and visual interest. I paint on canvas and 300 lb. watercolor paper. I always start with a specific color palette that I use in preliminary studies before moving to canvas (or paper). First strokes are usually acrylic washes then mark making and back to painting — but that can vary! Final steps involve glazes to add dimension and depth, and varnish coats.

Storm Light, 2018, acrylic and mixed media, 24 x 20 inches, $445

Storm Light, 2018, acrylic and mixed media, 24 x 20 inches, $445

Q: We were impressed with your Best in Show piece, titled Storm Light. Tell us more about this piece/series.

A: I first created a warm color palette of violet, red and chartreuse plus a touch of cool yellow; the black ink marks provide contrast and points of interest. A detailed use of texture evolved from the beginning with the acrylic paste to the canvas, then various paint layers, script-like marks and the final paper elements. With its strong horizontal line, it makes me think I’m looking through window blinds, seeing a small bit of sunlight under darkening clouds (hence the title!). But that’s my reflection — viewers should explore their own interpretations!

Estuary Fog, 2019, acrylic, 36 x 24 x 1.5 inches, $800

Estuary Fog, 2019, acrylic, 36 x 24 x 1.5 inches, $800

Q: What do you hope for viewers to take away from your art?

A: You know, abstract art is about relating to color and composition. I hope viewers can enjoy this fusion of color, shapes, lines and texture, find their own meaning or connection, and see that abstract art can be visually intriguing, absorbing and attractive.

Field Notes, 2018, acrylic and mixed media, 30 x 24 inches, $545

Field Notes, 2018, acrylic and mixed media, 30 x 24 inches, $545

Q: How do you view your art career in five years?

A: Still evolving and creating interesting, affordable art that captivates and intrigues people.

Photo source: the artist

Photo source: the artist

About the artist:

Abstract painter Cynthia Coldren explores contemporary concepts such as order and chaos, structure and ambiguity using acrylic paints, inks and mediums on canvas and paper. She studied fine art as an undergraduate student before completing her BAS in communications and management. While her early work embraced photorealism, she transitioned to an abstract style over the years, evolving a stronger thematic focus.

Cynthia lives in the Richardson, Texas. She has received recognition and awards in recent art exhibitions, gallery shows and juried competitions both online and in North Texas. She is a member of the Texas Artist Coalition (TAC), the Visual Arts Guild of Frisco (VAGF), the Richardson Civic Art Society (RCAS) and the International Society of Experimental Artists (ISEA).

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.cynthiacoldrenfineart.com. You may also follow the artist on Facebook at www.facebook.com/cynthiacoldrenfineart, as well as Instagram @cynthiacoldrenfineart.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

One World

One World

a mini-monologue by Ginger Cochran

As today is 9/11, I'd like to take a moment to encourage all within the realm of this writing and throughout the universe to try to take comfort in one another and not to fear one another.

We should choose kindness instead of hatred and elect tolerance over prejudice. We can learn to live together with a will to prosper, and accept the things we cannot change about others.

We should forget our entitled ways and adopt an act of service to our fellow people. We should govern ourselves with a character of consideration and not allow our feelings to shadow our logic.

For the sake of our future generations, we can no longer be one nation, but one world - coexisting in friendship and unity.

Photo credit: Google search

Photo credit: Google search


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Energy of The Sea

“…the challenge of capturing the movement and energy of the sea has remained with me.” - the artist

Water Falling Triptych, 2018, Graphite on MDF, 57 cm x 54 cm, $175 $125 + postage

Water Falling Triptych, 2018, Graphite on MDF, 57 cm x 54 cm, $175 $125 + postage

Q: Andrea, we were impressed by your style of painting onto wood sculpture. What led you to develop this technique?

A: To answer this question I have to go back to the amazing classical training I had as a student at Edinburgh College of Art. Our training in visual grammar and visual language in order to be able to communicate what we had to say was extraordinary. We were given a foundation in observational drawing, colour and form which were based on a long tradition of aesthetic understanding particular to the Scots. I specialised in sculpture and painting. Several decades later I have found a way to combine the two.

I got my first sculpture commission for Princes Street, Edinburgh from my final year exhibition and shortly after was taken on by a Cork Street Gallery in London. My career as a fine artist had got off to a great start and I continued to paint and sculpt for many years before being invited to devise original concepts for children's books. I went on to write and illustrate over 100 children's books, games and jigsaw puzzles. 23 international awards later I longed to get back to my roots in fine art.

The challenge of how to begin was daunting. You can't go back and produce another painting in the last series you had made a couple of decades earlier and so faced with the question how do you start from nowhere haunted me for some time. Then I began to visualise three dimensional paintings hanging in space. The more I mused the clearer the concept became. This was my new spring board. I started by making a small hanging piece 'Hommage to a Swimming Pool' which was constructed of two pieces of MDF slotted together. From this I developed the free-standing paintings - a double-sided painting on a base. I was fascinated by the effect of seeing the painting in perspective from different view points in space. I don't regard them as sculpture as the forms are deliberately designed as a shaped painting. Having developed the free-standing paintings, then exhibited them. The only work I had to go on the walls were traditional rectangular drawings and paintings. I realised there was an argument between the two forms so then went on to develop the 2 dimensional shaped wall paintings.

Cave Talk, 2018, Graphite on MDF, 46.5 cm x 23.5 cm

Cave Talk, 2018, Graphite on MDF, 46.5 cm x 23.5 cm

Q: Can you describe the materials you use and your creative process?

A: On leaving college I was fortunate to go to a lecture by Ansel Adams who was visiting Edinburgh. It was an evening which changed my whole approach to drawing. This I had not anticipated! Adams' explanation of the tonal scale from deep rich darks, through mysterious greys arriving at paler than pale whites which he developed in the dark room was inspirational. I left the lecture thinking 'dam it' he is doing with a camera what I want to do with a pencil! At the same time Gwen John, a British painter who worked with Rodin was another painter who fascinated me. She developed a numbered tonal scale and planned her ever so subtle tonal paintings, mathematically, in accordance with her numbered scale. I realised then that I needed to explore how to get the maximum tonal scale and riches from the basic material of graphite implements available at the time.

As students we had a few different pencils with a reasonable range of tones. At this point I bought the complete range of pencils available from 2H to 6B. I also discovered graphite powder, cardboard smudging tools and importantly the role erasers have as drawing implements as opposed to eradicators. Erasers come in many forms and materials. Each have their own distinct qualities in mark making. The other consideration is the material and surface you draw on. As students we were encourage to try out different papers to draw on; smooth, rough, thin, thick, newspaper, tissue paper, tracing paper, parcel paper, wall paper and so on.

I then went on to win a solo exhibition in London. Having always been passionate about drawing I realised I had a problem to solve. How could I produce drawings which fitted in with the family of shapes I had developed for my painting. I had at this point already made shaped drawings but within the white rectangular piece of paper. I had to get rid of the rectangle as I already knew right angles were out of place. It was then I decided to experiment with drawing on primed MDF. I had not anticipated how exciting this would be as the textures you could make on the primed surface were so very different to textures you can make on paper. The first drawing was made on a smoothly primed surface. The next one was done on thickly primed wood. I had found my answer!

Ellesmere Island Iceberg, 2018, Graphite on MDF, 32 cm x 80 cm $125 + postage

Ellesmere Island Iceberg, 2018, Graphite on MDF, 32 cm x 80 cm $125 + postage

Q: What inspires your subject matter?

Both the art colleges I trained at were located by the sea so my passion for working from nature dates back to the days when we were sent out every week to draw the coast. It was one thing drawing something static like the cliffs and rocks but the challenge of capturing the movement and energy of the sea has remained with me. A couple of years ago I spotted an opportunity to apply for a solo exhibition for which you required to put a detailed proposal forward based on your chosen theme. I asked myself why was I so passionate about water. It dated much further back than student days. From the age of around ten, when the words like global disasters and environmental humanities and pollution were not in common use or in the news, I worried that man did not appreciate the value of clean water. My father did medical research in India and Africa and returned telling me about the relationship of health and dirty water and the reality that people in these countries would never have clean water as we in the West have so would continue to die from water based diseases. He instilled in my an appreciation of the importance of water to the survival of life on earth. I was also a keen underwater swimmer so had a strong physical bond with water as well. These together with my visual fascination with the wide range of forms water can take have given me a deep connection with water, No! I am not born under Aquarius!

Falling Water Triptych, 2018, Graphite on MDF, 57 cm x 54 cm, $ 175 32 cm x 80 cm $125 + postage

Falling Water Triptych, 2018, Graphite on MDF, 57 cm x 54 cm, $ 175 32 cm x 80 cm $125 + postage

Q: We were impressed with your Best in Show piece, titled Falling Water Triptych, 2018, as well as the rest of the collection you submitted obviously. Tell us more about this piece/series.

A: Although my work is detailed I am not simply a representational artist. My mission explores the emotional symbolism of my subject matter. My focus is on interpreting nature, not simply rendering it photographically but trying to embody symbolic and spiritual meaning of my chosen subject. Jung saw the sea as the seat of the unconscious. Working from a specific location provides me with a framework to link me to my inner world. Without this the artistic journey would be a superficial dance with a brush.

I devoted a section of my H2O exhibition to Falling Water. My husband and I have a studio in Bergerac in the Dordogne. There are amazing waterfalls up in the French mountains were we spend hours simply trying to capture the energy, the movement and also the noise of water interacting with rocks.  As students we were taught to observe and respond but I now sit, watch and listen a long while before making any marks. This gets me in tune with the essence of my subject matter. The visual language of simplified forms has come from my attempts to eliminate the superfluous detail. My process is now meditative rather than responsive.

French Waterfall, 2018, Graphite on MDF, 30.5 cm x 50 cm, $125 + postage

French Waterfall, 2018, Graphite on MDF, 30.5 cm x 50 cm, $125 + postage

Q: What do you hope for viewers to take away from your art?

A: As an artist we cannot control what people get from our creations but art is a language of communication so I hope that people can tune into my passion and wonder for nature and in doing so be inspired to look at it for themselves with new eyes. If I can inspire them to treasure our environment and value our planet that would be wonderful. I also hope it will give them a bridge to get in touch with their own inner spirit. If your work has roots within your own psyche then people can tune into this, not to understand you but hopefully to understand themselves a little better.

Gimel Les Cascades IV, 2018,Graphite on MDF, 123 cm x 56 cm x 23.5 cm

Gimel Les Cascades IV, 2018,Graphite on MDF, 123 cm x 56 cm x 23.5 cm

Q: How do you view your art career in five years?

A: This is certainly the hardest question of all! It is also the most important one to answer as having clear targets drives one forward in a positive way.

There are three aspects to being a professional artist. The first is the creative journey you are on, the second is having the opportunity to communicate with one's audience  and lastly commercial success.

'It is important as an artist to allow space for the unexpected and the accidental.' These are the words of the best tutor, Jimmy Cummings, who taught me in my first year at Edinburgh. My discovery of drawing on primed MDF is a good example. At the same time it is important to embrace making images in a fresh way and have a vision of where the path you are on might be heading. Many artists when their work becomes ' commercially successful' then stay focused on producing more of the same having found an audience willing to purchase their work. Jimmy warned against the rut of repetition. I know there is much more to explore in making images work in space. There is opportunity to introduce the element of illusion which I suspect will take my work in a more abstract style. It takes courage to really explore our inner worlds which is the engine to artistic development. I would like to write a book on colour as this is one of the most magical ingredients to painting. The first homework Jimmy Cummings set us was to paint an image without having blue in your palette but which convinced him there was blue in the painting. Working out how to induce the colour blue sparked an exploration in colour which I have never lost. I am now exploring making paintings with multiple palettes and working out how to orchestrate a relationship between them so they work as a whole. In terms of subject matter I want to focus on the relationship of water and land. My aim is to get another solo exhibition as producing a body of work with a defined theme to explore is the most rewarding way of working.

Considering my position on the professional stage, I am currently preparing to join more online galleries. By their nature they reach a much broader and wider audience than a non-virtual gallery can. I have also been taken on by a couple of hotel art agents and want to pursue this as I want to produce more large scale pieces. To produce a piece for a hospital foyer would be more meaning full for me than displaying a piece in a major public art gallery. I would also like to generate enough income to have my pieces made in metal and enamel so they can be displayed outside and maintain their vibrant colour.

Commercial success is not my priority but I am a good business woman so have a drive for financial gain but what I really want is for my work to have meaning for my audience be it in a domestic or public setting.  It is an added bonus to selling a piece for it to have a 'good home'. I recently sold a couple of paintings to a London barrister whose daughter is seriously ill. She bought paintings 'Deep Pool' and 'Blue Cave' hoping they will bring her daughter a sense of calm. That the meditative quality I had tried to imbue the 'Deep Pool with might help heal a child has to be the best home a painting can find. Another piece has been purchased by a gentleman to inspire him at work. I hope in five years time to have produced more pieces that have this level of appreciation.

Photo source: the artist

Photo source: the artist

About the artist:

Andrea Shearing creates 2d and 3D free standing shaped drawings. They are made of MDF which is primed with acrylic paint and made with a wide range of graphite implements as well as graphite powder. She uses a variety of rubbers to lift and draws into graphite and also card board implements to smooth and rubs soft tones together. The work is based on real locations with a focus on nature.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.andreashearing.com, as well as follow the artist on Instagram @andreashearing.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Terra & Tide: a contemporary collective

ENVISION ARTS VIRTUAL GALLERY, TERRA & TIDE IS NOW ON DISPLAY

FROM SEPTEMBER 1ST - SEPTEMBER 30TH.

We were pleased to have received numerous submissions from talented artists across the United States and over 15 countries, including Germany, Hong Kong, France, The Netherlands, Sweden, Canada, Australia, Nigeria, Greece and more!

We could not be more excited to reach so many talented artists! Thank you so much to all of the artists who applied for sharing your work with us.

We are pleased to announce Best in Show winner as Nerissa Cargill Thompson, from Manchester, United Kingdom, for her piece titled Message in a Bottle, 2019.

Message in a Bottle, 2019, mixed media sculpture, 21 x 9 x 3, £125

Message in a Bottle, 2019, mixed media sculpture, 21 x 9 x 3, £125

About the artist:

Nerissa Cargill Thompson encourages the viewer to stop and look closer; to consider the beauty, value and purpose in the old and discarded through photography and three-dimensional textiles. Her work investigates how things change appearance & shape over time, not just eroding or decaying but also new layers of growth, giving interesting juxtapositions of structure and colour. She uses old clothes and scrap materials within her work for economic & ecological sustainability, choosing fabrics that hold some significance or connection to the work.

The artist invites us to consider the packaging that we use and discard on a daily basis; objects such as drinks bottles that are so lightweight and seem so insignificant that we barely notice them. Casting concrete in actual litter to give this waste a greater physical and psychological presence that mirrors the seriousness of the ecological catastrophe we are creating with them

Cargill Thompson’s incorporation of detailed embroidery touches upon the way our waste becomes subsumed into the natural world around us. However, the pretty, colourful lichens, seaweed and molluscs fail to obliterate the hulking, grey, concrete bottles that peer out from beneath them. The damage we are causing to planet Earth and ourselves may be hidden but it is there nevertheless and needs our immediate attention.


I’d also like to take a moment to list our honorable mentions for this exhibit:

Sarah Loch-Test, from Texas, United States; Andrea Shearing, from East Sussex, United Kingdom; and Monica Meyer, from London, United Kingdom.

Sarah Loch-Test. Cuyahoga on Fire, 2016, Copper, Brass, Sterling Silver and Enamel, 3 x 2 x .5 inches, $600

Sarah Loch-Test. Cuyahoga on Fire, 2016, Copper, Brass, Sterling Silver and Enamel, 3 x 2 x .5 inches, $600

A very special thank you to all artists who applied for this virtual gallery. Congratulations to all!

Visit this exhibition HERE.

To view our current calls for artists, please visit HERE.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Black + White: a contemporary collective

ENVISION ARTS VIRTUAL GALLERY, BLACK + WHITE IS NOW ON DISPLAY

FROM SEPTEMBER 1ST - SEPTEMBER 30TH.

We were pleased to have received numerous submissions from talented artists across the United States and abroad, including Germany, Italy, Japan, Greece, Latvia, Bulgaria, Ireland and more!

We could not be more excited to reach so many artists! Thank you so much to all of the artists who applied for sharing your work with us.

We are pleased to announce Best in Show winner as Andrea Shearing, from East Sussex, United Kingdom, for her piece titled Falling Water Triptych, 2018.

Falling Water Triptych, 2018, Graphite on MDF, 57 cm x 54 cm, 32 cm x 80 cm, $175 + postage

Falling Water Triptych, 2018, Graphite on MDF, 57 cm x 54 cm, 32 cm x 80 cm, $175 + postage

About the artist:

Andrea was born in UK but raised in Switzerland until she was 16 when her family moved to Sussex. Andrea did her Foundation Course at Eastbourne School of Art before studying both painting and sculpture at Edinburgh College of Art. After 25 years in Scotland she moved to Dorset as Head of Natural History Illustration and went on to Cambridge as Head of Graphic Arts and Illustration. Andrea has married another Eastbourne School of Art painter and they have studios in East Sussex and Bergerac France. They have also converted a vintage French fire engine into a mobile studio in which they are travelling around the British coast, both passionate about painting the sea.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.andreashearing.com, as well as follow the artist on Facebook and Instagram @andreashearing.


I’d also like to take a moment to list our honorable mentions for this exhibit:

Mary Wemple, from Texas, United States; Dustin Schaible, from Texas, United States; and Yoko Choi, from Yishun, Singapore.

Mary Wemple. Moth, 2015, Sculpted collage, 6.5 x 5.5 x 2.5 inches, $150

Mary Wemple. Moth, 2015, Sculpted collage, 6.5 x 5.5 x 2.5 inches, $150

A very special thank you to all artists who applied for this virtual gallery. Congratulations to all!

Visit this exhibition HERE.

To view our current calls for artists, please visit HERE.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

The Play of Colors

“I seek to capture original contemplative and emotional responses in the play of colors.” - the artist

Going for a Stroll, 2018, Watercolor on Arches Paper, 11 x 14, $300

Going for a Stroll, 2018, Watercolor on Arches Paper, 11 x 14, $300

My life experiences drive my art. The people, places and things that move or excite me become my canvas. I then seek to capture those original contemplative and emotional responses in the play of colors.

Twilight, 2018, Watercolor on Arches Paper, 11 x 14, $350

Twilight, 2018, Watercolor on Arches Paper, 11 x 14, $350

With a formal training in architecture, I am regularly contracted to craft elegant outdoor living spaces for homeowners and this comes from thriving on a palette of colors and an eye for architectural details. You will see my work distinguish these fascinations. And all throughout, you’ll find nature intruding thru a play of light & shade.

Peacekeeper, August 2019, Watercolor on 100% Rag Cotton Paper, 11 x 15, $350

Peacekeeper, August 2019, Watercolor on 100% Rag Cotton Paper, 11 x 15, $350

I paint in watercolor and acrylic. Watercolor fascinates me due to it's versatile and fluid nature. I use the wet on wet, dry brush and pouring technique -arraying rich pigments of blues, browns, greens, and purple along with splashes of contrasting colors. In the midst of the colors’ translucency, I find a fascinating rhythm as the colors crossover/blend with each other.

Hall Office Park, March 2018, Watercolor on Arches Paper, 11 x 14, $350

Hall Office Park, March 2018, Watercolor on Arches Paper, 11 x 14, $350

I am a residential landscape designer and a fine artist. My passion for art and architecture started young while I watched my father use his artistic skills to create beautiful portraits and architectural plans that transformed empty lots into elegant homes. This inspired me to pursue my education in architecture and furthermore in landscape architecture.

Reflection, July 2019, Watercolor on 100% Rag Cotton Paper, 11 x 14, $300

Reflection, July 2019, Watercolor on 100% Rag Cotton Paper, 11 x 14, $300

As part of my formal education, I toured several cities and villages in India to study their architecture, city-scape, urban marketplaces, the rural life, their landscape and the daily lives of people. My education in landscape architecture brought me closer to nature and it’s landscape. Eventually, my architectural journey became the subjects of my paintings and sketches.

Spring, April 2018, Watercolor on 100% Rag Cotton Paper, 14.75 x 22.75, $450

Spring, April 2018, Watercolor on 100% Rag Cotton Paper, 14.75 x 22.75, $450

About the artist:

I am Aparna, a residential landscape designer and a visual artist in Frisco, Texas. I like creating contemplative art and designing life style driven and visually pleasing landscape design solutions. Whether you desire a quiet cozy corner for reading or ample space for entertaining with extensive views of nature, I can work hand in hand with you, the home owner and guide you through this creative journey.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.facebook.com/aparnagallery, as well as follow the artist on Instagram @aparnagallery.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Physical Traces

“I aim to create work that ultimately asks more questions than it answers.” - the artist

this is water (in kelp), 2019, exposed 16mm film underwater, A5, £100

this is water (in kelp), 2019, exposed 16mm film underwater, A5, £100

Through subtle abstraction of everyday forms my work focuses on the way material things convey immaterial ideas. Often working with analogue film, super8 and 16mm, incorporating the light, sound, and object of the projector in a sculptural manner to create works that investigate physicality. Objects or three dimensional forms can be used as a vehicle, with photography or video, to create a gestalt through the process of constructing and distorting. Exploring the concepts of the screen in relation to image by using imprecise and unreliable equipment, inconducive to quality of image, my work leans into and embraces the technical faults of the medium and uses it to its advantage. Celluloid film retains the combination of moving image and physical object in a way that cannot be replicated digitally, which is why, as a medium, it is vital to my work.

this is earth (in air), 2019, mould grown on 16mm film, A5, £100

this is earth (in air), 2019, mould grown on 16mm film, A5, £100

Can a film be a sculpture? I believe so and aim to investigate space and the movement and orientation within in it. Often looping the film using the existing space, the sound and physicality of these loops, incorporated into the architecture through their hanging, is often as much a part of the piece as the image on the film itself. More than just a flat image on a two dimensional screen, the film becomes light, colour, movement, and sound.

this is earth (in ground), 2019, exposed 16mm film buried underground, A5, £100

this is earth (in ground), 2019, exposed 16mm film buried underground, A5, £100

Often there is no narrative, a non-linear disruption of conventional cinema. From inception to completion the use of this physical medium to create an intangible effect is integral to my process. Though the end product is sometimes shown digitally, making work on film situates the body and the process of its making in the forefront, demonstrated through the artefacts and physical vestiges left on the film.

this is earth (in body), 2019, blood on 16mm film, A5, £100

this is earth (in body), 2019, blood on 16mm film, A5, £100

With my practice situated so firmly in the physical I collect a variety of things I use in my work, mostly mundane found objects, detritus of a quotidian existence, investigating the concept of ready-mades but also our human response to the physical things around us. Objects without context can be ascribed any meaning that the viewer chooses, placing their potential power, or lack thereof, in the eye of the beholder. By choosing and examining these things, taking them out of context, I attempt to give them a weight that they would not have in their original conditions.

this is fire (in phosphorous), 2019, burnt 16mm film, A5, £100

this is fire (in phosphorous), 2019, burnt 16mm film, A5, £100

Through my practice, eschewing conventional narrative in favour of the emotive object, with its materiality and presence, with or without function, and engaging with ideas of light and colour, texture and space through the use of film, I aim to create work that ultimately asks more questions than it answers.

this is water (in salt), 2019, exposed 16mm film underwater, A5, £100

this is water (in salt), 2019, exposed 16mm film underwater, A5, £100

In this series I bring organic and synthetic material (mould grown atop agar; dirt; glue; blood; bleach; the holes formed by the burning of a matchstick; saltwater) into contact with lengths of celluloid, either directly forming the image or altering that which was exposed via a camera. The results are then telecined before being projected back onto 16mm. This process creates an exposed-enclosed relationship, in which film is subjected to various substances and light while simultaneously ‘trapping’ the physical traces.

Photo source: the artist

Photo source: the artist

About the artist:

Monica Meyer is an American artist, born 1993, living and working in London, UK. Recently Meyer graduated from Slade School of Fine Art with an MFA degree, studying Sculpture before completing the degree in Media. With a multi-disciplinary approach to her practice, Meyer utilises moving image but situates it firmly in the realm of the physical. Previously Meyer gained her BA degree from Richmond International University. Recent work includes the Slade Degree Show, a sound work on Resonance FM radio, show with North.Street Collective at Unit 5 Gallery, and a screening of a 16mm film work and a digital video/performance at Close Up Cinema.

To view more work by the artist, please visit mcmmeyer.com. You may also follow the artist on Instagram @2mins58.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

About Festivals and Other Witticisms

About Festivals and Other Witticisms

a poem by Daniel de Culla

          My mother already told me:

-Son, nowhere dogs are tied with sausage.

          But me, obstinately, had to go out of my land, travel the World. A World that, for me, was always flat.

-I’m a poet, mother; and Poetry is my name. And I have to drink from other waters, because the path of Life is short, and my thirst for love and knowledge is very tight. That, here, in Madrid, mother, there is little to drag and much to lose.

-Well, son, be very careful, and call me. Behave like a gentleman, and see if you succeed in what I know you go to those festivals: "to reap that barley that the girls have between two columns that support their soul."

-Mother, I will earn a lot of money, and, although I know that the Girls' suture is worth a fortune, I will return one day and I will reward you.

          My mother was really smart.

          At about midnight, I went to the airport to catch a plane that would take me from here to there.

          First, I was a witness of the Shoreline of Infinity. Event Horizon Science Fiction & Fantasy Special Festival "The Return", Edinburgh, Lothian, UK.

          Another day, at The Hucknall Byron Festival, in Nottinghamshire, UK.

          From England I went to Germany, dreaming of enjoying what I most wanted in the performances of the APA-B Association for Performance Arts in Berlin.

          Oh, oh, oh. Sad and distressed, seeing that I was my own wife and, also, my dear, I flew to Australia, in order to live its extraordinary festivals at the Byron Bay: "Byron Comedy Fest", and "Byron Writers Festival".

          Drinking, dancing and singing, I hurt my feet and my ribs hurt. I grabbed a table in a coffee bar, and broke my head from dreams.

- Madam, what are you looking at me? What are you looking at me?

-Son, nothing.

          The time I spent in both Festival, I was not attentive to the Verse or the musical note. Just, I just looked at those pretty faces that had a sex to dip bread.

          When the act was over, my illusion was over, leaving the sap of my bones lifeless and heartless, because I ended up loving myself, following the Onan’s footsteps.

          I did not eat a thread at such a festival. I followed the steps of the girls, to see where he put it, and when he reached his portal, he always told them that I was cuming. So, they didn't answer anything to me, and they left me.

          By the way, one day that I was badly dancing a tango with a great girl, in Byron Bay, Australia, I remembered the definition of the Tango that my friend Jesus did. It is: “Tango is like playing Teto: We dance; She lifts her leg, and I go into her. ”

          I wanted to fall in love,  but I was expelled by indecent from the Tango’s Festival.

          Very sad and heartbroken, after spending three years, almost four years, I returned to Madrid and, on the plane back home, to my own goldfinch my sorrows I told him:

-Goldfinch, goldfinch, what do you have to tell me, for a woman I love and look for and I can't get her in it.

          The goldfinch replied:

- To the woman you have to treat with sweetness and firmness; and with sincere kisses you will soften its hardness.

          Already in Madrid, I followed in her footsteps, as the goldfinch said; and, after all, I achieved much more than I thought.

          With my beloved, my "half orange", I moved to Burgos.

          Here, at the SanFran Mary Jane, a music bar, at “Asphalt Poetry” or “Brick Music” festivals, from time to time, I participate, dreaming with attending, one day, the Palm Beach Poetry Festival, Lake Worth, Florida, USA .

          This site, the SanFran Mary Jeane, is a cool place, because, in addition to the festivals, if you ask to eat, they give you salty sardines, and if you ask to drink they give you broom water.

Photo source: the author

Photo source: the author

About the author:

Daniel de Culla is a writer, poet, and photographer. He’s member of the Spanish Writers Association, Earthly Writers International Caucus, Poets of the World, (IA) International Authors, Surrealism Art, Friends of The Blake Society, and others. Director of Gallo Tricolor Review, and Robespierre Review. He participated in many Festivals of Poetry, and Theater in Madrid, Burgos, Berlin, Minden, Hannover and Genève. He has exhibited in many galleries from Madrid, Burgos, London, and Amsterdam. He is moving between North Hollywood, Madrid and Burgos; e-mail: gallotricolor@yahoo.com


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

The Poor

The Poor

a poem by Adnan Shafi

 

friend A, 2016. Artist:  Hiroko Oikawa . pencil on paper 38 ×54 cm $380

friend A, 2016. Artist: Hiroko Oikawa. pencil on paper 38 ×54 cm $380

I never concern that one is living

In the approbatory jiffs of being rich

Afresh tromping the poor beneath

their feet

That hefty encumbrance,

 

Too hefty for their daily brawn

That ingurgitating their beliefs,

Had amorousness, in some worthy

jiffs of life,

The circumspect consecration,

 

The poor are laid waste, like the

gutter worms when clean were it expunged in any wrench

preponderant would boff them instantly bereft of life-

 

Never seen a man undaunted in the lower class,

Daring to confront,

That impulsive vigor, spooky, I would like to see.

About the author:

Young Adnan Shafi, (23) was born and brought up in a middle class educated Bhat family, which belongs to Chandrigam in Tral area of Kashmir valley. He is a poet, writer, columnist , translator, short story writer  and reviewer. 

 His poetry book "TEARS FALL IN MY HEART'  depicts sorrows and vicissitudes of life. There are various hues in his poems ranging from love to loneliness and despair. Besides, his poetry is replete with simplicity of thought and language. Some of the poems are autobiographical in nature which relate to his own life’s vows.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Symbols

“As a First Nations artist, I work at the intersection of esotericism, personal growth and social change. I am interested in the Universality within all indigenous wisdom teaching. I use symbols, patterns and archetypal themes.” - the artist

Infinity Emerging & Returning to its Own Centre (Archival Print) 36 x 24 inches, $222

Infinity Emerging & Returning to its Own Centre (Archival Print) 36 x 24 inches, $222

Infinity Emerging and Returning Back to Itself depicts the shape of infinity, also known as the torus. It is said that the torus is the shape of the human aura and indeed is that of the magnetic field of the heart (Toroidal Energetic Field) that is constantly refreshing and influencing itself. “The three-torus (torus with torus within torus) is a cosmological model. The theory describes the shape of the universe (topology) as a three-dimensional torus”. (Wikipedia) Today’s science demonstrates what ancient mysticism has always known; the vortex of creation with the creator at the centre.

Ishta + Infinity, 9.75 x 19.75 inches, $555

Ishta + Infinity, 9.75 x 19.75 inches, $555

In this work, I use gestural lines to represent the layers of the experience that make creation itself. A white dot at the centre of the experience is the pure consciousness that resides within the heart centre of all sentient beings who experience themselves within creation. Like an ancient yantra or medicine wheel, the circumference of the symbol represents the aspects of the cosmos which then joins at the centre, where a concentration of consciousness is defined. These ancient symbols show us the Truth of Creation and are maps to our own power, liberation and Self knowledge.

Polarities 1, Mixed media collage on canvas, 24 x 36 inches, $888

Polarities 1, Mixed media collage on canvas, 24 x 36 inches, $888

Process With dance like gestures, Ishta demonstrates the nature of the subtle energetic toroidal field as the lines flow to characterize the subtle frequency that is the magnetic field of the heart and that of the chakras. By performing basic movement gestures to acknowledge directions and aspects of creation, Ishta transmits translates these movements into a visual representation of the energy field she is attuning to.

Polarities 2, Mixed media collage on canvas, 24 x 36 inches, $888

Polarities 2, Mixed media collage on canvas, 24 x 36 inches, $888

In addition to the Infinity (torus shape), Ishta introduces the double helix. While the torus defines the geometry of consciousness, the double helix demonstrates the DNA structures of creation. As we look to ancient teachings, we discover the double helix as an ancient symbol describing the aspects of masculine and feminine coming into balance. When they do it brings illumination and liberation to those who activate it. The double helix is also synonymous with the chakra system, known to ancient India. These ancient Universal symbols are known around the world in many versions of geometry representing the 2 sides of masculine and feminine aspects. Ishta is doing ongoing research and art making around these Universal principles known to our ancestors long before science and quantum physics could discover the evidence that confirms the previously ridiculed and systematically destroyed wisdom teachings.

Ishta + Double Helix (Archival Photograph on aluminum) 19.75 x 19.75 inches, $555

Ishta + Double Helix (Archival Photograph on aluminum) 19.75 x 19.75 inches, $555

Additional works in collage expound on the details of the foundational works of the infinity (torus) and the double helix. In this growing collection of illustration and collage, Ishta expands on the Universal concepts of the polarities and elements of creation. Using predominantly black and combining a messy gestural style with plenty of white spaces unifies the entire body of work, to offer a cohesive and dynamic exhibit.

To view more work by the artist, please visit ishtadevi.com. You may also follow the artist on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ishtathedevi, as well as Instagram @ishtadevi.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Winter’s Footprint

Winter’s Footprint

a poem by Pasithea Chan

 

Tundra, 2019. Artist:  Allina Forrester . Watercolor and ink, 14 x 11 inches, NFS

Tundra, 2019. Artist: Allina Forrester. Watercolor and ink, 14 x 11 inches, NFS

Hurt hurls its winds of woes

as sorrow curls its snowy toes.

Love follows the past’s shadows

sinking in life’s muddy morrows.

Time burrows with horrors

laying dormant behind icy mirrors.

Loneliness echoes from regret’s bellows.

rustling memories’ leaves tumbling like dominoes.

 

Joy stands crossing its elbows

as worry rubs its hands to fiery egos.

Yearning sobs burying its head in pillows

Distance grows drinking circumstance’s marrows.

Time laughs as apology comes and goes

trying to have tea with logic’s plea at the gallows.

Misunderstanding trips and dies of overdose

leaving care’s bodies to freeze on sorrow’s snows.

 

Life is a cycle with love for a rose

A rose that bears sorrows in pairs

holding hope’s plumes as it blooms

only to die in doubt’s shadowy sky

with every try seeming like a lie

tearing a heart apart with mistrust’s dart.

 

Life is a lonely planet when we don’t plan it.

Words whip hearts that were once lit

with love for spring and joys that bring

summer’s fruits as memories that fit

stories with lines that left souls to mint

autumn’s silence as a stint

of love’s winter making its footprint.

About the author:

Pasithea Chan is a budding Lebanese Filipino impressionist who enjoys writing poetry in symbolism laced with philosophy and psychology. She writes in various styles but prefers pieces that have double meanings to allow a reader to delve deeper into her works. You can find her on TheUglyWriters.com , Osprey Empire All Home Solutions, The Poet's Corner, Rigorous, Envision Arts, Fevers of the Mind, Suicide, The Voices of Real and Ello on: ello.co/pasitheaanimalibera

Twitter: twitter.com/RogueMalachite


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

A Utopian Vision

“My aim is to overcome my marginality through creating a utopian vision, which reconnects me to my childhood.” - the artist

The Epiphany of Henut II, oil on painting, 170 x 100 cm, $5000

The Epiphany of Henut II, oil on painting, 170 x 100 cm, $5000

My art explores my status as a half-Asian, queer artist, who has no sense of “home” in post-colonialist, feminist and psychoanalytical terms.

The Epiphany of Henut I, oil on painting, 170 x 100 cm, $5000

The Epiphany of Henut I, oil on painting, 170 x 100 cm, $5000

A specimen of globalization, I was born in Kazakhstan, my father - North Korean and my mother - Russian. Having caught a glimpse of the USSR, I have a conflicting perception of cultural systems. Unable to assimilate into any culture, I am a banished outsider with no origins.

Entropy, oil on painting, 190 x 80 cm, $3000

Entropy, oil on painting, 190 x 80 cm, $3000

Stemming from this inability to integrate, I am drawn to creating a utopia through my performance art: a paradise, where I can reinvent myself to whom I truly want to be, and not what the mundane reality holds in store. This performativity enables me to come to terms with my depression, where the saddening sense of nostalgia used to permeate my existence and taint every experience of reality that I had.

Just do it, oil on painting, 170 x 100 cm, $7000

Just do it, oil on painting, 170 x 100 cm, $7000

I work in a range of media including performance, film and painting.

My performances take the shape of drag queen style, “mockumentary” music videos, where I reenact pop culture songs, which bring me closer to this infantile state of euphoria and inner freedom.

Sketch(a), 2019, oil on canvas, 42 x 29 cm, NFS

Sketch(a), 2019, oil on canvas, 42 x 29 cm, NFS

"The Epiphany of Henut”: Taking inspiration from the British artist, Alison Jackson, this diptych portrays the objectification of the female body throughout human history in the shape of putting two women on the cross of different races: black and white. The series contextually bases itself on theorist, Judith Butler's essay, "Subversive Bodily Acts", which describes various idiosyncracies and subversions of queer communities. The females both have rabbit faces as part of Kan's creation of a half-human, half-animalistic, utopia creature. The works were completed during Kan's time at SIM residency in Reykavik, Iceland, which she was awarded this year. Both paintings were shown at SIM Studios, attracting a wide range of audiences from the Icelandic artistic public. They will similarly be presented at Herrick Gallery in Mayfair, London this October.

To view more work by the artist, please visit 18thstreet.org/artists/katya-kan. You may also follow the artist on Facebook at www.facebook.com/katya.artist, as well as Instagram @_katyakan_.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Ex Situ Conservation

“…manifests in both tangible and networked environments.” - the artist

Male DVI-D to Female VGA, 2016, photograph-Glicee print, 24 x 36 inches, $2500

Male DVI-D to Female VGA, 2016, photograph-Glicee print, 24 x 36 inches, $2500

Through fictive and dramatic scenarios, in films, theatrical installations, stories and scripts; [the] work renders aspects of how humans relate to machines and how the arc of technological advances emerges, becomes pervasive, spawns the next invention and eventually, is rendered obsolete.

CPU Fans, 2016, photograph-Glicee print, 24 x 36 inches, $2500

CPU Fans, 2016, photograph-Glicee print, 24 x 36 inches, $2500

Her work engages a palimpsest of technologies layered over the environments in which they have developed. By juxtaposing a past reality with the present, and extolling both the beauty and the beastliness of invention, her work engages in a narrative of the human condition by framing individual moments in the limelight of technological invention over time.

Test Lead Double Insulator Alligator Probe Wire Set, 2016, photograph-Glicee print, 24 x 36 inches, $2500

Test Lead Double Insulator Alligator Probe Wire Set, 2016, photograph-Glicee print, 24 x 36 inches, $2500

EX SITU CONSERVATION: Colony Relocation for Industrial Detritus consists of 10 images, in an edition of 10. The images depict machine parts and electronic elements situated as surviving artifacts of technologies going obsolete and re-located in the natural landscape to see if they will "thrive."

Considering it is the extinction of natural things which is the vital issue, I would hope for some irony in picturing the opposite, applying a sort of reverse psychology to reverence of technology at any price to the environment.

Virtually Indestructible Keyboard, 2016, photo-Glicee print, 24 x 36 inches, $2500

Virtually Indestructible Keyboard, 2016, photo-Glicee print, 24 x 36 inches, $2500

Photo source: the artist

Photo source: the artist

About the artist:

Born in Brooklyn, New York, Adrianne Wortzel is a New York artist who studied with Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, and Jimmy Ernst, Louise Bourgeois, among others. Support for her work has been forthcoming from the National Science Foundation; Eyebeam Art and Technology Center; the Swiss Artists-in-Labs Program; the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at the University of Zurich; Dora Maar Foundation, Franklin Furnace Fund for Performance Art, Greenwall Foundation; New York Foundation for the Arts, Brooklyn Museum, and the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation. Her writings are published in national and international publications. Selected exhibition venues include the Whitney Museum of American Art, Asheville Art Museum, Imagine Science Film Festival, Electronica, Creative Time, MIT Vera List Center; Orlando Museum of Art; Moderna Museet-Stockholm. She is a retired Professor of Emerging Media Technologies at Citytech, CUNY, and Founding Director of StudioBlueLab, an interdisciplinary collaborative facility at Cooper Union for Advancement of Science and Art.

To view more work by the artist, please visit adriannewortzel.com. You may also follow the artist on Instagram @adriannewortzel.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Our Connection to Nature

“…beauty and sustainability help us experience the essence of life and magnify our connection to nature.” - the artist

On its way, 2018, ink, watercolor & pastel on paper, 11 x 15 in, $225

On its way, 2018, ink, watercolor & pastel on paper, 11 x 15 in, $225

Just like the scent of the earth after a rain awakens our senses, so can art, beauty and sustainability help us experience the essence of life and magnify our connection to nature. An expansive outlook gives us a chance to see beyond ourselves and reconnect to our shared humanity.

Some flowers I found in the garden, 2017, ink, watercolor & pastel on paper, 11 x 15 in, $225

Some flowers I found in the garden, 2017, ink, watercolor & pastel on paper, 11 x 15 in, $225

My series, The Sustainability of Beauty, focuses on the climate crisis and the regeneration of nature. In a culture that prizes technology and data, I create visual haiku’s that make sensual connections with ecology. The work invokes the living world with vibrant colors, dancing strokes and sensual organic forms.

Garden in a seed, 2018, ink & watercolor on paper, 11 x 15 in, $225

Garden in a seed, 2018, ink & watercolor on paper, 11 x 15 in, $225

Inspired by the words of Emily Dickinson, I seek ‘that phosphorescence, that light within’ in my art. I illustrate complex environmental issues as symbolic calligraphy. I paint on paper with ink, watercolors and pastels.

Sweeping Blossoms, 2018, ink & watercolor on paper, 9 x 12 in, $175

Sweeping Blossoms, 2018, ink & watercolor on paper, 9 x 12 in, $175

During the last five years, I have completed marketing assignments for sustainability architects in San Francisco. My artwork incorporates themes and metaphors from my ongoing studies related to green building, renewable energy, urban resilience, water reuse, living within natural limits and inter-dependency of all life forms.

New moon seed, 2018, ink & watercolor on paper, 11 x 15 in, $225

New moon seed, 2018, ink & watercolor on paper, 11 x 15 in, $225

The question I ask myself is how can I inspire people to reengage with these ideas from a fresh perspective. In order to gain a wider audience, I explore how beauty evokes emotions that transform. The stories and visuals synthesize complex and varied forms of abstract ideas into tangible, emotional, and meaningful art.

Reaching for the sky, 2018, ink, watercolor & pastel on paper, 11 x 15 in, $225

Reaching for the sky, 2018, ink, watercolor & pastel on paper, 11 x 15 in, $225

By engaging peoples’ hearts and minds with vivid impressions of the most pressing issue of our time, I intend to spark a breakthrough of concern and conscious activism for the environment.

To view more by the artist, please visit marlenesinicki.com. You may also follow the artist on Instagram @marlenesinicki.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

The Hero

“Notions of competition accompany this fetishization of the hero.” - the artist

Leave Your Dreams, I'll Give You New Ones, 2019, acrylic and oil on canvas, 26 x 36 inches, $4,000

Leave Your Dreams, I'll Give You New Ones, 2019, acrylic and oil on canvas, 26 x 36 inches, $4,000

My work conveys a grandiose narrative that operates analogously to ancient legends. The focus on heroism provides an entry point to the cult of masculinity. The hero is the perfect example of humanity in terms of both strength and beauty. Echoing these classic forms, my work highlights the impossibility of obtaining this otherworldly level of perfection. Notions of competition accompany this fetishization of the hero.

But Now I'm Only Falling Apart, 2017, acrylic and oil on canvas, 12 x 9 inches, NFS

But Now I'm Only Falling Apart, 2017, acrylic and oil on canvas, 12 x 9 inches, NFS

It is visually emphasized through grid and square structures- allusions to game boards, checkered flags, and pixels. This evokes associations with the early days of computer imagery. Strangely flat yet slightly three-dimensional graphics reference the onset of the digital age; this arouses persistent and intoxicating feelings of nostalgia.

Like The Deserts Miss The Rain, 2018, acrylic and oil on canvas, 24 x 20 inches, NFS

Like The Deserts Miss The Rain, 2018, acrylic and oil on canvas, 24 x 20 inches, NFS

Through these images I construct portals to a mythical dimension. They are not necessarily accessible to the viewer, but serve as evidence of an idyllic paradise. The squares and lines deliberately eliminate parts of the landscape as if a visual representation of an unclear memory. Color gradients act as surrogates for tropical settings, sunsets, and seascapes. They serve as postcards from an archaic journey that may or may not have been experienced.

He Turns Me To Gold In The Sunlight, 2018, acrylic and oil on canvas, 20 x 30 inches, $2,600

He Turns Me To Gold In The Sunlight, 2018, acrylic and oil on canvas, 20 x 30 inches, $2,600

The core of my conceptual practice concerns itself with notions of intimacy. Longing and desire are among the most common tropes illustrated in ancient mythology. Each work serves as a visual manifestation of an imprisoning emotional state, ending in either triumph or pain. The powerful, godly bodies are depicted in a way to reveal their more vulnerable, melancholic and human side. The paintings dismantle our society’s disaffinity towards male intimacy and celebrate a tender masculinity.

Nothing Can Take Away These Blues, 2017, acrylic and oil on canvas, 36 x 24 inches, $3,800

Nothing Can Take Away These Blues, 2017, acrylic and oil on canvas, 36 x 24 inches, $3,800

A crucial element of this narrative is the focus on melodrama. Mass consumption of drama, from ancient tragedies to modern pop music is a fundamental aspect of cultural experience. Times may change but humanity will consistently face the same trials and tribulations. I navigate these various systems and social structures in order to tell queer, often untold, stories.

These Hollow Days I Miss You, 2019, acrylic and oil on canvas, 14 x 11 inches, $900

These Hollow Days I Miss You, 2019, acrylic and oil on canvas, 14 x 11 inches, $900

Photo source: the artist

Photo source: the artist

About the artist:

Paul Anagnostopoulos is an artist working in a variety of media, primarily drawing and painting. He was born 1991 in Long Island, NY and works in NY, NY. He graduated Summa Cum Laude from New York University in 2013 with a BFA concentrating in Drawing and Printmaking. He interned at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice during the 2013 Biennale and gave lectures and private tours, during which he became a guest contributor for The Boulevardiers. During 2014, Paul was a resident and exhibiting artist of the Rancho Paradiso Residency in Joshua Tree, CA and the Akumal International Artist Residency in Mexico. During 2015, he began as Marlborough Chelsea's archivist, curated several pop-up exhibitions in Huntington, NY, and completed the Copy Shop Residency at Endless Editions in NY. In 2016, Paul was an exhibiting artist in residence at the SÍM Residency in Reykjavík, Iceland; the Wassaic Project in Hudson Valley, NY; AIAR in Guanajuato, Mexico; the Vermont Studio Center in Johnson, Vermont; Brooklyn Art Space & Trestle Gallery in Brooklyn, NY. In 2017, he completed a residency at the Hafnarborg Museum in Iceland. His first solo exhibition, Holding Out For A Hero, was presented in 2018 at GoggleWorks Center for the Arts in Reading, PA. That same year he worked for the artist Sean Scully and completed the Maple Terrace Residency Program in Brooklyn, NY. Paul’s upcoming solo exhibition will take place in January 2020 at the Leslie-Lohman Project Space in NY, NY.

To view more work by the artist, please visit panagnos.com. You may also follow the artist on Instagram @paolopablopaul.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

We Sit In The Silence

Two Poems

by Valida Baba

We sit in the silence of a noisy world We look around seeing only what we have.

Comings, goings are all around. We sit in the silence – waiting for a new world.

One man speaks, another man listens. Two men spoke but silence heard – Words moved from one space to another.

Language exchanged yet nothing has changed.

They spoke, they silenced: One went to the right –another to the left.

***

To be tough and strong, is it me or does it want to be me? So much in me, too much in me, how to let it be?

Ballet, perfume, powder, the smell of a theater – to let it go? Can it go? …

And it happened. How? It happened. When? It happened. Ballet, perfume, powder – to let you go?

Can you go? Can I go and come back? Will you take me back?

The chain is broken…Time, Space, Form – now, boat, movement One organism, two bodies, perfect connection.

Who says you cannot fly? Push! Stand on your feet! Embrace!

Who says you cannot move? One step right, one step back. Time, space, form – will you lead me back? Do you know how to take it back?

One step left, one step further, Stop now, listen now – Must follow me now, lead me later. One step back, one step further.

And it happened again. How? It happened. When? It happened.

Re-la-tion-ship! Does it relate to ship or life? Who will carry and lead me? – Trust! Will you lead me?

One step back, one step further. Stop now, ought it to end now? Who will bring the end now?

…TO EACH OTHER – SILENCE SPOKE: D-E-A-T-H

Photo source: the author

Photo source: the author

About the author:

Valida Baba (1988) was born in Azerbaijan. She completed her BA in Business Administration at Azerbaijan State Economic University (Baku, 2010), Azerbaijan. In 2013, she was accepted into a Short Study Program in English at the Department of Photography at FAMU (Film and TV School of Academy of Performing Arts in Prague), Czech Republic. She studied at the Department of Documentary Photography by the atelier Viktor Kolář. She recently graduated from MA of Humanities at the Anglo-American University in Prague, Czech Republic, and now she is a freelancer in the art sector of Prague.

You may learn more about the author @valida_baba, as well as vimeo.com/validababa.

 


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.