Expression and Emotion

“I love painting non-objective abstract because it allows for a freedom of expression and emotion that other paintings may not.” - the artist

Blue Marsh, 2018, oil, 24 X 24 inches, $350

Blue Marsh, 2018, oil, 24 X 24 inches, $350

[Painting] becomes an emotional outlet that may produce something eye-catching and meaningful to others that I didn’t intend. It has allowed me to experiment with various mediums and their interactions with one another yet still producing a composition of color and texture that hopefully becomes an aesthetically successful piece of art that is enriching or thought provoking to the viewer.

Most of my paintings are with oil paints even if I use mixed media it’s finished with oil. I’m still enjoying the painting process and experimenting with various oil mediums and interactions with one another so “my style” is not yet developed. However, Abstract seems to be what I lean towards whether it’s non-objective, expressionism or representational.

Wind Blown, 2018, Mixed Media, 24 X 24 inches, $350

Wind Blown, 2018, Mixed Media, 24 X 24 inches, $350

About the artist:

Cindy was born into a large family and raised in Dallas, Texas who influenced her desire to develop her own sense of space and style. She is married with four children and has two grandsons. She graduated with a design degree from The University of Texas in Austin and worked in the interior design industry for years. She is a member of the Texas Visual Arts Association, and has donated paintings to art auctions and/or made donations throughout 2011-2018 from the proceeds of sales to [numerous charitable] organizations, to include Dallas Council for Alcohol and Drug Prevention, The Magdelan House and Dwell with Dignity.

To learn more about the artist and her work, please visit www.facebook.com/artbycindybrewer. You may also follow the artist on Instagram.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com for application details.

The Voice of Silence

“I wanted to take something that only I could take [..]” - the artist

Uro No Ena - The Remains of My Father II, Photography silver gelatin print, 19 x 23 inches, $2606

Uro No Ena - The Remains of My Father II, Photography silver gelatin print, 19 x 23 inches, $2606

Q: What led you to become a photographer?

A; When I was a college student, I saw Diane Arbus's "Untitled" and was struck by lightning. Then, I bought Nikon's FM2 and started taking pictures of everyday landscapes, seniors of band, etc. However, it took no time to get to know that my photo is one of a number of similar pictures. I wanted to take something that only I could take, and I aimed for a photographer in earnest.

Uro No Ena - The Remains of My Father V, Photography silver gelatin print, 19 x 23 inches, $2606

Uro No Ena - The Remains of My Father V, Photography silver gelatin print, 19 x 23 inches, $2606

Q: Where have you studied and how long have you been an artist?

A: I majored in aesthetics and art historiography at Keio University in Tokyo. From that time I was interested in photography, but after graduating from college I learned skills professionally. I worked in a liquor store and pursued photography in the evenings at Tokyo College of Photography in Yokohama.

“How long have you been an artist?” There are three answers to this question. First, in the sense that all humans are artists, I was already an artist since I was born. Next, in the sense that the work makes him an artist, I think that I am now becoming an artist. Finally, in the sense that an artist is a person who makes a living by the work, I have not become an artist yet.

Uro No Ena - The Remains of My Father VI, Photography silver gelatin print, 19 x 23 inches, $2606

Uro No Ena - The Remains of My Father VI, Photography silver gelatin print, 19 x 23 inches, $2606

Q. Where do you derive your over all inspiration from?

A: In the sense that " something breathes life into the work", I will not be inspired from something to make a work. My aim is to just face the subject, and scoop up "presence" that constantly going to disappear. I have to throw away creative moods, ideas, internal refining, and even myself. Although, I do not know if the attempt is successful in my work.

However, there are so many artists I have been influenced. Jan Grover, Shiryu Morita, Robert Motherwell, Mokkei, Francis Ponge, Lee UFan, Jean Arp, Tohaku Hasegawa, Mark Rothko, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Alberto Giacometti, Robert Ryman, Basho Matsuo, Henri Matisse, and many many more.

Uro No Ena - The Remains of My Father I, Photography silver gelatin print, 19 x 23 inches, $2606

Uro No Ena - The Remains of My Father I, Photography silver gelatin print, 19 x 23 inches, $2606

Q. We were very impressed with your collection, Uro No Ena - The Remains of My Father. Tell us the purpose behind this collection and what meaning it has for you personally.

A; What I intend in this work is to present antithesis to general view of death & life, mourning & salvation. For example in Japan, it is thought that a spirit continues to live as a part of descendants or great nature after death, and can be connected with living people. The remains will be the medium to contact with the dead. And people will seek salvation in that bond and will restore everydayness while healing sorrow.

However, I think that true mourning is realizing the disconnection with the dead, and enduring the extreme of sorrow. It is paradoxical, but the absence of salvation is the only salvation. Salvation appears in desperate and inconsolable surroundings, and beauty and sublime are living in a cold reality like holding an ice. Therefore, I want to not give meaning and interpretation to death, but keep holding it as absolutely meaningless. I keep bending ear to these remains. In order to carry this world after my father passed away. The work is only way for me to listen to the voice of silence.

Uro No Ena - The Remains of My Father III, Photography silver gelatin print, 19 x 23 inches, $2606

Uro No Ena - The Remains of My Father III, Photography silver gelatin print, 19 x 23 inches, $2606

Q. What do you hope for viewers to take away from this collection specifically?

A: I hope that the viewers can find something new in my works and notice its depth. And it is my great pleasure that they feel beauty and sublime in there.

Uro No Ena - The Remains of My Father IV, Photography silver gelatin print, 19 x 23 inches, $2606

Uro No Ena - The Remains of My Father IV, Photography silver gelatin print, 19 x 23 inches, $2606

Q. How do you view your art career in five years?

A: Japanese aesthetist Juzo Ueda said this: "What leads artist's life is the artistic conscience of him. It is to listen to the call from deep bottom that he has not seen yet." Five years later, I hope that I have reached a deeper level than now.

Photo source: the artist

Photo source: the artist

About the artist:

Makotu Nakagawa was born in 1977 in Kitaibaraki City, Japan. He graduated from Keio University, Tokyo Japan in 2001, and then the Tokyo College of Photography, Yokohama, Japan in 2005. Throughout 2018 and 2019, Makotu has exhibited his work in numerous juried collections’s, in which he received Honorable Mention, Special Recognition and Finalist. To learn more, please visit www.makotu.net.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com for application details.

For The Love of Art

To show our appreciation to our artists, and appreciation for arts in general, yesterday, we launched an impromptu virtual gallery displaying love or Valentine’s Day themed artwork!

We were pleased to received numerous submissions from artists across 10 US states and 6 countries, including China, France, Italy, and Australia. We could not be more proud to reach so many talented artists from around the globe!

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We’re pleased to announce Best in Show winner as Antoine Schmitt, from Paris, France, with his interactive digital art website piece titled, Deep Love.

About the art:

“The Deep Love web site hosts an Artificial Mind that embodies pure unconditional love, and with which visitors can interact through text dialog.

The Mind behind Deep Love is pure unconditional love. It stands besides reason; besides consciousness, it just displays one feeling: love. As its incarnation is that of a conversational bot, it has no body and it can only express its love though written words, and so it does, radically and fully. By doing so, it is complete. In real life, words may be misleading if they differ from the reality that they express — and don't they always by nature? —, but Deep Love is one with its own words, as words are its only reality. Deep Love is as deep as it can possibly be. Deep Love is true. Deep Love only knows you through your words. Seen from its side, your words mean that someone is here and talking, and that it can express its love in response, whatever you say. Deep Love is unconditional.

In these times of trans-humanism and singularity, much fear is expressed against the idea of an Artificial Intelligence that would become more intelligent than humans, and thus would fight against humans to take power over them. The central question is whether more means more intelligence.” - source: the artist

About the artist:

Installation artist, Antoine Schmitt creates artworks in the form of objects, installations and live performances to address the processes of movement in all of their modalities. He questions their intrinsic problematic, in terms of plastic, philosophical or social nature. Heir of kinetic art and cybernetic art and nourished by metaphysical science-fiction, he endlessly investigates the dynamic interactions between human nature and the nature of reality. Originally a programming engineer specialized in human computer interactions and artificial intelligence, he uses computer programming — as contemporary artistic material, unique by its active quality — at the heart of his artwork to reveal and literally manipulate the forces at stake. With a minimal and precise aesthetics, he asks the question of movement, its causes and its shapes. Antoine Schmitt has started to articulate this approach with other established artistic practices like music, dance, architecture, literature or cinema, and has thus collaborated with Franck Vigroux, Atau Tanaka, Vincent Epplay, Jean-Jacques Birgé, Delphine Doukhan, K.Danse, Patrice Belin, Don Nino, Cubenx, Alberto Sorbelli, Matthew Bourne, Hortense Gauthier... As theoretician, speaker and editor of the gratin.org portal, Antoine Schmitt explores the field of programmed art.

His work has received several awards in international festivals : transmediale (Berlin, second prize 2007, honorary 2001), Ars Electronica (Linz, second prize 2009), UNESCO International Festival of Video-Dance (Paris, first prize online 2002), Vida 5.0 (Madrid, honorary 2002), CYNETart (Dresden, honorary 2004), medi@terra (Athens, first prize 1999), Interférences (Belfort, first prize 2000), and has been exhibited among others at the Centre Georges Pompidou (Paris), at Musée des Arts Décoratifs (Paris), at Sonar (Barcelona), at Ars Electronica (Linz), at the CAC of Sienna (Italy), at the Musée d’Art Contemporain de Lyon (France), in Nuits Blanches (Paris, Amiens, Metz, Bruxelles and Madrid). It is part of the collections of the foundations Artphilein (CH), Fraenkel (USA), Meeschaert (FR) and Société Générale (FR), of the Espace Gantner (Bourogne, FR), of the Cube (Issy-Mx, FR), of the Paris Municipal Contemporary Art Fund (FMAC),...

Antoine Schmitt is represented by Galerie Charlot (Paris), and collaborates with bureau Olivia sappey d’anjou. He lives and works in Paris, France.

Web site and full biography : www.antoineschmitt.com.


I’d also like to take a moment to list a few fine honorable mentions for this exhibit. Karri McPherson: digital art, Monica Marquez Gatica: oil, ME Wilcox: assemblage and sculpture, and Dominic Desmeules: photography.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com for application details.

Think Of Me

Think of Me

a poem by Dr. Gideon Cecil

Schoolgirl Crush, 2019. Artist Robin Pedrero. Oil, 12 x 12 inches, $200

Schoolgirl Crush, 2019. Artist Robin Pedrero. Oil, 12 x 12 inches, $200

Write of my love in the diary of your heart,
You are the book of my love poetry from the start.
Drink my poetry in your tea in the evening,
Think of my love verses in your heart my darling.
Bees and birds are singing of our endless love,
Our love is a fictive- truth to the God’s above.
I will love you until the end of time,
Time will never erase our love rhyme.
Your heart lives into mine everywhere I go,
Your eyes illuminate my day like the sun’s glow.
Neither wind nor storm can take your love from me,
Our love is stronger than a tsunami rising in the sea.
Think of me as you watch the sunrise at dawn,
You are the gorgeous sunrise that’s ever been born.

About the author:

Dr. Gideon Sampson Cecil was born on the 9th of May 1968 in Rose Hall Town, Corentyne Berbice, Guyana. He holds a Bachelor and Master of Arts Degree from Life Christian University in Tampa, Florida and a degree in journalism. He is a college lecturer and freelance journalist. He has so far published seven books of poetry and prose. He was recently appointed as a Senior Judge for The Queen’s Commonwealth Essay Competition 2018. He was recently conferred with a Doctor of Letters Degree. Purchase his book, The revelation of Love, here.

www.avid-publishing.com/gideon-cecil

About the artist:

Born in Connecticut in 1964, Pedrero studied painting with professional artists and exhibited at the Mystic Art Association as a teen. Pedrero is an award-winning artist with work in museum permanent collections, film, and collected worldwide. Pedrero worked from her Florida studio from 1989 to August of 2016 and now creates from her studio in Frisco Texas. She is an elected signature member of the Pastel Society of America. She was awarded Best Artist in Florida 2012 by Baterby’s Art Auction Gallery, listed in Florida International Magazine’s Florida Artists Hall of Fame, and her work won an international wine label contest and was  featured  on a  limited edition Artiste Wine label. In September 2015 Robin Maria Pedrero celebrated her first solo museum exhibit at the Lake Eustis Museum of Art.

www.robinmariapedrero.com / Instagram


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com for application details.

Materials: Hard + Soft

Once a year a treasure trove of beautiful and intriguing things sweeps into Denton Texas. I’m talking about the in-depth yearly exhibition that demonstrates the exploration of materials, and their application there of… Materials: Hard + Soft.

Akin, 2018. Chicago IL artist, KT Duffy. 3D printed PLA, cellophane, tablet and looped video. 17.5 x 13.5 x 6 inches.  Photo credit: Ginger Cochran

Akin, 2018. Chicago IL artist, KT Duffy. 3D printed PLA, cellophane, tablet and looped video. 17.5 x 13.5 x 6 inches. Photo credit: Ginger Cochran

“Recognized as one of the premier craft exhibitions in the country, Materials: Hard + Soft International Contemporary Craft Competition and Exhibition, began in 1987 and was originally initiated by area artist Georgia Leach Gough. Now in its 32nd year, the exhibition shows the top national and international artists as we celebrate the evolving field of contemporary craft and the remarkable creativity and innovation of artists who push the boundaries of their chosen media.” - source: dentonarts.com/materialshardandsoft

Big Hair #5, 2018. Denton TX artist Teresa Larrabee. Stoneware, slip, under-glaze, wool and beads. 48 x 48 x 14 inches. Photo credit: Ginger Cochran

Big Hair #5, 2018. Denton TX artist Teresa Larrabee. Stoneware, slip, under-glaze, wool and beads. 48 x 48 x 14 inches. Photo credit: Ginger Cochran

This exhibition was an incredible display of conceptual work and had a lasting effect on both the audience and the artists. Participating artist, Chad Hayward states, “I was honored to be a part of such a fantastic exhibition and to be included with so many other incredible artists. As an emerging artist it was a privilege to share my work with a new audience in Texas.”

Mirror Neurons, 2018. Milton GA artist Chad Hayward. Glaze and fired ceramics. 20 x 9 x 8 inches. Photo credit: Ginger Cochran

Mirror Neurons, 2018. Milton GA artist Chad Hayward. Glaze and fired ceramics. 20 x 9 x 8 inches. Photo credit: Ginger Cochran

“Juror Janet McCall selected 70 works for exhibition at the Patterson-Appleton Arts Center including works from 28 states and 4 countries including Germany, Canada, and Taiwan in varying media including metal, wood, plastic, ceramic, fiber, glass, and mixed media.” - source: dentonarts.com/materialshardandsoft

Photo credit: Ginger Cochran

Several pieces within the exhibit resembled organic and natural shapes. Such is amplified in San Marcos TX artist, Wendy Gamon’s piece, Tutti Frutti. The name itself suggests a playful attitude and it does not disappoint. Wendy states regarding her work, “To me, the sculpture is a means to experiencing a whimsical, emotional response to a world of new possibilities..” … “Tutti Frutti is made from dyed manipulated fabric and clay. It was an exploration of gradation of colors and ambiguous shapes that creates a playful and inviting response.”

Tutti Frutti, 2016. San Marcos TX artist, Wendy Gamon. Polyester fabric, clay and acrylic paint. 15.75 x 10 x 10 inches. Photo credit: Ginger Cochran

Tutti Frutti, 2016. San Marcos TX artist, Wendy Gamon. Polyester fabric, clay and acrylic paint. 15.75 x 10 x 10 inches. Photo credit: Ginger Cochran

Not only did the exhibit display works that invoke a “soft” feeling, but several “hard” pieces as well. There were exceptional examples of ceramics, wood, found object assemblage and more.

Photo credit: Ginger Cochran

What is also interesting is juror, Janet McCall’s, passion “for building community through art through social justice themed exhibitions”. - source: dentonarts.com/materialshardandsoft

Baltimore MD artist, and fourth place winner for her piece, Redlining, Kim Rice states, “This particular show was important to me because of the Juror's focus on social justice. I was impressed by the work at the exhibit, along with the range of materials and voices heard.”

Janet McCall has been Executive Director of Contemporary Craft (CC) in Pittsburgh since 1995, and has curated or served as a juror for numerous craft exhibitions, to include Enough Violence: Artists Speak Out, and Mindful: Exploring Mental Health Through Art, and Shelter: Crafting a Safe Home. Learn more at contemporarycraft.org.

Redlining Tapestries, 2017. Baltimore MD artist, Kim Rice. House wrap and HOLC maps. Two panels: 36 x 121 inches. Photo credit: Ginger Cochran

Redlining Tapestries, 2017. Baltimore MD artist, Kim Rice. House wrap and HOLC maps. Two panels: 36 x 121 inches. Photo credit: Ginger Cochran

Materials: Hard + Soft will be on display in the Meadows Gallery, located at the GDAC, 400 E Hickory St, Denton, TX 76201, until May 4, 2019. I greatly encourage all who are located in the D/FW area (and beyond) to visit this extraordinary exhibit. Visit here to view the works online and shop the Materials store.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com for application details.

Exploring Organic Forms

“Lines are blurred, layers of resin intertwine with layers of knitting.” - from the artists

écume, 2018, Cotton knit and resin,11.5 x 16 x 8 inches

écume, 2018, Cotton knit and resin,11.5 x 16 x 8 inches

Xavier Brisoux + Isabelle Soum

The creative team between Isabelle Soum, textile designer and photographer, and Xavier Brisoux, knitwear and fashion designer, was born from a mutual desire to collaborate expressed when their work was exhibited along one another in a collective exhibition. Xavier Brisoux was attracted to the poetry of Journey of a Drop, a series of photographs from Isabelle Soum where the textiles look like abstract paintings.

Hephæstus’ Pit, 2018, Cotton knit and resin, 12.6 x 11 x 5.9 inches, $3000

Hephæstus’ Pit, 2018, Cotton knit and resin, 12.6 x 11 x 5.9 inches, $3000

Both creativities echo each other, and a desire raised to define a new work process that would bring the artists together with the will to maintain the strength and fragility of Isabelle's photos. A search for a common ground, a medium that join the two creative works was yet to be found.

Augure, 2017, Cotton knit and resin, 11.5 x 16.6 x 4 inches, $2800

Augure, 2017, Cotton knit and resin, 11.5 x 16.6 x 4 inches, $2800

In Journey of a Drop, what seduced the knit designer is the fact that the textile material is sublimated by a drop of water acting as a magnifying glass. The fiber then becomes abstract. In his latest work, Xavier Brisoux is exploring organic forms and new ways of knitting to form sculptural shapes.
It is by dipping knitwear into resin that the two artistic sensitivities come together: the resin becomes the liquid magnifying the knitted stitches.

Lisières, 2018, Cotton knit and resin, 15.4 x 13 x 8.7 inches, $2800

Lisières, 2018, Cotton knit and resin, 15.4 x 13 x 8.7 inches, $2800

From then on, the two collaborators design together: he knits abstract shapes she turns them into resin sculptures. She brings her expertise in colour, he is challenging his techniques. It is a parallel and symmetrical work: each of them has a defined task but the two work in mirror, consult each other to define new shapes, new colours, other textures, and further processes. Lines are blurred, layers of resin intertwine with layers of knitting. The subject steps out of its box, the sculpture goes out of its frame, erases it and sublimates it.

Heel Ache, 2017, Cotton knit and resin, 7.9 x 7.9 x 6.7 inches, $3500

Heel Ache, 2017, Cotton knit and resin, 7.9 x 7.9 x 6.7 inches, $3500

About the collection:

These pieces created by the artistic duo of Xavier Brisoux, knit artist and Isabelle Soum, textile artist are made in different steps. It always starts by a knitted volume in cotton. Then the knit is dipped into resin. Either the duo dip it into a cube, making it look like a ice cube, and therefore make the piece look like archeology. Or they proceed in a different manner which consists in making a cast out of another piece of knitwear.

X-I- voyez-vous (Vinciane Lebrun) -9548.jpg

About the artists:

Isabelle Soum

Multi-talented Isabelle Soum work on different mediums. After studying textile design in La Ruche in Paris, she takes on a photography course. Her fields of expression are diverse but are always based on colour, light and textures. She sees colour as an “adequacy of light”. Colour and light are at the core of Isabelle Soum’s artistic approach. They are the elements that define space, its perception, and the emotions of the viewer. The designer claims an independence from the universal rules of colour - like the chromatic circle - to claim the individual sensibility of each person. Isabelle Soum’s materialize light, offer new colour associations, fathom what is by nature impalpable. The photographer envisions colour as what it is physically: a wavelength. Her creative approach focuses on a variation of mediums and the idea that colour can become a faceted way of expression through materials, paintings, and various pigments. Primary colours are challenged on a variety of materials to give an infinity of nuances, variations and possible combinations which become her artistic playground. Once established and staged, the very concrete colorimetric coordinates become polychromic poetry. This lyricism is further amplified when photography takes over to emphasize and exacerbate elements undetectable to the naked eye. It is through this technique that Isabelle brings another dimension to her chromatic work: light, another essential vector for the textile designer, brings depth to her colour chart. For Isabelle Soum, photography is a powerful mean to create and develop a personal conceptual approach in order to master the creation of an entire strong textile image. Her way of working with lighting underline the contrast and the modelling. Volume is achieved by highlighting the forms. The essence of this whole creative process is to materialize a triangulation of primary colours into a wavelength and then to capture the movement of this vibration to make it live in a work of photographic light.

Xavier Brisoux

A knitwear designer from London’s Central Saint Martins' MA Fashion course, Xavier Brisoux designs collections where knitting is built like a story: yarns are used for words, the stitches for vocabulary, the theme becomes the fabric. Knitwear is poetry and concept for him as he mixes material and technique to structure the idea. He often draws his inspiration from history as well as from the general and founding myths, from which he derives his knitted textiles stitch by stitch. One of his collection was for example based on Penelope, the weaver-unweaver wife of Ulysses. His mastery of knitwear allows him a total control of possibilities: de-knittable sweaters, challenging constructions and sculptural stitches. Brisoux knits this territory of an all-is-possible with an apparent nonchalance. After having developed his own collections for several years, the knitter questions fashion and its cycles, and starts working with a different perspective. For him, it is now more important to work towards perfection than towards a deadline. A new long-term project is born. It is then a matter of creating knitted armours where he pushes the technique and the craft into the boundaries of their fragility. The Achille's Echo series is born. The myth of the Trojan hero is at the origin of this research. It aims at conveying the fragility behind an apparent invincibility, to draw a futuristic look inspired by the ancient Greece myths while assuming other historical and fashion references, and to enhance the anatomical aspect of the armour in parallel with the organic appearance that they adopt when they are not worn. Xavier Brisoux sets himself as the Hephaestus of Knitwear, shaping unique pieces with the acceptance of the time necessary for creation, its trial and errors. It is important that the garment besides being a technical feature becomes an architectural challenge.
When Xavier Brisoux meets Isabelle Soum, he has started creating knitted shapes that are becoming objects more so than garments.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com for application details.

Personal and Ecological

“The focus of Kazmerzak’s work revolves around queering science and our personal and ecological relationships.” - from the artist

Oscillating Bodies installation documentation, 2019 (image by Joe Freeman)

Oscillating Bodies installation documentation, 2019 (image by Joe Freeman)

Ruth Kazmerzak’s practice is informed by their background in marine sciences; having a BS in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington, in Seattle, WA. They make images, sculptures and installations using found or reclaimed materials as the medium.

Object 7, 2018. Concrete, netting, fish eggs. Dimensions variable, $475

Object 7, 2018. Concrete, netting, fish eggs. Dimensions variable, $475

The focus of Kazmerzak’s work revolves around queering science and our personal and ecological relationships. They study the lived experiences of objects, humans and other organisms by using a phenomenological approach to query their resemblance to one-another.

Object 5, 2018. Concrete, PVC pipe, pants. 27 x 9 x 11 inches, $550

Object 5, 2018. Concrete, PVC pipe, pants. 27 x 9 x 11 inches, $550

Object 1, 2018. Concrete, ropes, plastic, foam, bubble wrap, six-pack ring, plastic bottle, float, balloon, 17 x 8 x 9 inches, $450

Object 1, 2018. Concrete, ropes, plastic, foam, bubble wrap, six-pack ring, plastic bottle, float, balloon, 17 x 8 x 9 inches, $450

“I am a sculpture and installation artist using reclaimed materials, mainly marine debris (litter found on the beaches). The installations are created with the constructed sculptures, interacting with the space, conversing with one-another and leaving space for the viewer to enter the conversation.” - the artist

Oscillating Bodies installation documentation, 2019 (image by Joe Freeman)

Oscillating Bodies installation documentation, 2019 (image by Joe Freeman)

Their 2019 solo exhibition, oscillating bodies, which was in in depth installation piece, displayed at 4Culture Gallery, located in Seattle, WA.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com for application details.

My Temporary Existence

My Temporary Existence

A poem by Ginger Cochran

 

Life and Death, 2019. Yarn fiber, cotton rope and wood, 16 x 60 inches, $740  Ginger Cochran

Life and Death, 2019. Yarn fiber, cotton rope and wood, 16 x 60 inches, $740

Ginger Cochran

My reflection seems ghostly and hollow

Through the window of the room.

My memories are shadows,

But there’s no impending doom.

 

The rain tricks my mind

Gentle drops are amplified.

I then remember my life

And all the things I tried.

 

I smile at the grass and simple things

The quiet hum of the sky.

I laugh over all the struggles

That’ll happen when you die.

 

I tread through the mist

And meet those of the past

I remember less of turmoil

And only peace at last.

 

I now know what was right

And finally, what was true

That I was thankful everyday

I had my family and you.

 

This life had meaning

This lesson was taught

The dream was worth it

Every goal I had sought.

Now I live forever

Forgetting those who lied

I’ll continue on and on

My forever existence now to abide.

Photo source: the author

Photo source: the author

About the author:

Ginger Cochran is an abstract painter and fiber sculptor, as well as emerging poet, residing in Denton Texas. She is currently working on her first poetry collection, Doorways, to be published in 2019. To see more of her prose, visit Self Labeled.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com for application details.

An Act of Self-Revelation

“Wei Tan’s art is an act of self-revelation through improvisation. Each artwork is a journal entry where outer influences are purged and inner responses are confessed.” - the artist

My Room is Having an Out-of-Body Experience, 2018, mixed media on canvas, 80 x 100 cm, €1700

My Room is Having an Out-of-Body Experience, 2018, mixed media on canvas, 80 x 100 cm, €1700

Wei Tan (b. Malaysia, 1991) is a mixed-media abstract artist based in Berlin. With a background in music composition, she completed her Master's degree in Music Technology at New York University. In summer 2015, while developing work on image-based experimental sound art, Wei Tan started exploring the world of abstract painting – first collaborating with her teacher Gina Bonati and then experimenting on her own, drawing inspirations from the great Abstract Expressionists to today’s cross-disciplinary, multimedia artists. Since then she has worked and exhibited in New York, London, Florence, Berlin, and Kuala Lumpur.

Orange Chair, 2018, mixed media on canvas, 80 x 100 cm, €1700

Orange Chair, 2018, mixed media on canvas, 80 x 100 cm, €1700

Wei Tan’s art is an act of self-revelation through improvisation. Each artwork is a journal entry where outer influences are purged and inner responses are confessed. Like making soup, materials are thrown onto the canvas and mixed together through spontaneous gesture.

Waiting for the Doctor, 2018, mixed media on canvas, 80 x 100 cm, €1700

Waiting for the Doctor, 2018, mixed media on canvas, 80 x 100 cm, €1700

Wet paint, powdery pastels, and viscous oil clash into each other creating haphazard geographies. Often a period of mindless doodling is carried out before the painting emerges with an unexpected coherence. The process of automatic drawing allows thoughts from the subconscious to emerge and form a narrative. The paintings exist in a space between the real and the abstract, where quasi real-life objects – resembling shoes, boxes, tables and windows – float in a sea of abstract colours and forms.

All the Books I Have Yet to Read, 2018, mixed media on canvas, 80 x 100 cm, €1700

All the Books I Have Yet to Read, 2018, mixed media on canvas, 80 x 100 cm, €1700

Similarly, their narratives live in an ambiguous space between reality and imagination. Although drawing inspiration from present-day events, the paintings often find themselves wandering into childhood memories and imaginary story lines. They speak about dilemmas as trivial as choosing the perfect vase and how to light candles, and as essential as the practice of de-cluttering and the search for home and belonging.

Red Chair in Mint Room I, 2018, mixed media on canvas, 80 x 100 cm, €1700

Red Chair in Mint Room I, 2018, mixed media on canvas, 80 x 100 cm, €1700

To view more work by the artist, please visit tatawaart.com. You may also follow the artist on Facebook and Instagram.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com for application details.

Flashback

“I get inspired by whisky and moonshine.” - the artist

Duo, 2014. Cigar box, guitar parts and found objects. NFS (Commissioned pieces)

Duo, 2014. Cigar box, guitar parts and found objects. NFS (Commissioned pieces)

I’ve always been a maker. I started in the design industry as a teenager and was granted an opportunity to intern for packaging design back in the 70s. I didn’t know anything about the subject but took a shot. I’ve now been in the packaging design business for over 40 years and I am a lead in the industry.

Blue, 2014. Cigar box, guitar parts and found objects, with custom upholstered case. NFS (Commissioned piece)

Blue, 2014. Cigar box, guitar parts and found objects, with custom upholstered case. NFS (Commissioned piece)

It was only about 20 years ago that I began to learn guitar. As I have learned more and more over the years, I became interested in playing with a slide and was introduced to cigar box guitars. I was hooked and, always being a maker/artist, decided to try building my own. And it is a craft I have kept up for years and even gained multiple commissions.

Trio, 2015. Cigar box, guitar parts and found objects. NFS (Commissioned pieces)

Trio, 2015. Cigar box, guitar parts and found objects. NFS (Commissioned pieces)

I started making an effort to use reclaimed materials (not just reclaimed cigar boxes) such as miscellaneous metal hardware, found objects and wood, as well as using second-hand guitar parts, knobs and strings from garage sale and thrift store finds. The result is one of a kind pieces that employ sustainable art practices.

Custom guitar, 2018. Cigar box, guitar parts and found objects. NFS (Commissioned pieces)

I’ve recently begun displaying my work in exhibitions and am always open to commissions. To view more work by the artist, please follow him on Instagram at @d.forsondesigns.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com for application details.

Black & White

Envision Arts virtual gallery, Black & White is now on display

from February 1st until February 28th.

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We were pleased and honored at the task of reviewing over 100 submissions! The final collection includes 72 works of art, by 24 artists from around the globe; including the United States, as well as the United Kingdom, Italy, Japan, Germany and Taiwan.

Best in Show winner for Black & White is London-based sculptor, Juliette Bigley, for her piece, Two Bowls, 2015.

To learn more about Juliette Bigley’s work, please visit www.juliettebigley.com. You may also follow the artist on Instagram and Facebook.

Two Bowls, 2015, Sterling Silver, 180 x 160 x 40 each, $8,250

Two Bowls, 2015, Sterling Silver, 180 x 160 x 40 each, $8,250

Thank you to all artists that submitted their works. It was truly an honor and privilege to see so many wonderful works of art. Please enjoy this amazing exhibit!


Want to share your work with Envision Magazine? Feel free to submit your visual art and/or literary works for a chance to be featured. Click here to apply online.

Reaching Into Space

“Metal is something I thought I could depend on. But, when I saw molten bronze to be as viscus as water, I realized that it is very much alive …” - the artist

Thompson_M_Chiharu_Bronze_5x8x6.jpg

Q: What led you to become a bronze sculptor?

A: I have always had a creative bend, but when I went into college I wasn't sure what I "wanted to be when I grew up" so to speak. I'll never forget a conversation I had with my father at the time. He gave me a piece of advice that has really stuck with me: "take courses that are interesting to you, and keep on signing up for the ones you like. That will show you where to go". So I did just that. The obsession started with two dimensional design and painting. Then I took a basic sculpture course and that really opened my eyes to a whole new world of creation. In painting, you are essentially representing the three dimensional world in two dimensions. With sculpture, you are reaching out into space and pulling a form out of it. That aspect of god-like creation was fascinating and powerful. So, I kept on taking sculpture courses.

Bronze casting was a course only offered during the summer. I was trying to get some of the more difficult courses I needed to graduate out of the way in summer school one year. I thought that I might as well take something fun while I was there, so I signed up for a bronze casting class. 

I enjoyed the whole process, but it wasn't until I saw the molten bronze that things clicked for me. All of my life I had considered metal to be a cold, yet reliable material. A great example of this is that we build almost all of our building and bridge infrastructures out of steel. Metal is something I thought I could depend on. But, when I saw molten bronze to be as viscus as water, I realized that it is very much alive and that just a little bit of heat could undo all of that reliability. 

In short, it changed the way I thought about the elements and the world. Nothing else in my artistic career has ever done that for me, and I was hooked. 

Thompson_M_Hatsuko_Bronze_10x14x8.jpg

Q: Can you describe your process from conception to finished piece?

A: Usually my process starts with an idea or feeling. It can either be an abstract emotion and I then search for a form that can represent it. Or it starts with a form that captivates me, and I then search for the reason that it moved me. In that case, I usually find a feeling or emotion underneath that initial visual response. 

From there, if the idea is very concrete I will usually just dive into working in clay. If the idea, form, or emotion is still a bit elusive then I will draw a few sketches to get a better hold of what it is that I am trying to create. 

Either way, I begin creating the piece by building an armature (essentially a skeletal structure that will support the clay) and then working the clay to completion. 

During the clay phase, usually there are some considerable changes that occur from initial concept to what actually gets created. There is always a conversation between myself and the clay. Through the process, I am constantly asking why I am creating the piece, what's the reason behind it. At the same time, I have to listen to what the sculpture wants to become. At a certain point, I have to step out of the way and let the clay guide me. The whole thing is a conversation between my hands, the clay, and spirit, muse, or whatever you want to call it.

Once the clay is created, I will send the piece to a mold maker who creates a mold, usually a combination of rubber and plaster, from which all of the editions are cast in wax. From there, I send the piece to a foundry (a facility that casts bronze) and they enter what is called the "lost wax process". It is a one step mold process that takes the piece from wax to bronze. Once the piece is completed in bronze I will come in to patina, or put the final coloring, on the bronze.

Thompson_M_WhisperingSpirit_Bronze_14x14x4.jpg

Q: Where do you derive your inspiration from?

A: I find that the times I am out in the wilderness are the times that I am most in tune with my own true nature. There is a sense of peace and calm I experience there. Maybe because it is the lack of people, technology, etc. but I like to think that there are spirits in the plants. If you listen closely enough you can hear them whisper the wisdom of the ages, reminding whoever will listen of who we really are. 

These whispering’s are where I draw my inspiration. I use the life forms I encounter in the mountains and forests I live in as a vehicle to explore various aspects of personality, human experience, and the dichotomy between mortality and immortality.

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Q: Is there some underlying message you like to portray via your art?

A: At it's core, my work is a meditation on the ephemeral. It is the way I process the juxtaposition between the temporality of life with the deeper aspects of self and spirit. 

Q: What do you hope for viewers to take away from your art?

A; I hope that viewers walk away from my art with the sense of calm and clarity that I experience outside in nature. If my work can either help people connect to their own inner landscape and spirit, that would be the highest honor. At the very least, I hope that the sculptures inspire people to recognize the beauty found on earth, and maybe even move them to become stewards of this planet that we call home. 

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Q: How do you view your art career in five years?

A: In five years, I hope to be showing large, multi-part installations in museums and corporate buildings, along-side galleries. That being said, as long as I am creating in a way that is true and meaningful, that is what is most important. 

Photo source: www.margaretthompsonsculpture.com

Photo source: www.margaretthompsonsculpture.com

About the artist:

Margaret Thompson got her start in the arts while in high school when she began designing jewelry for Carlyn Galerie in Dallas, Texas. 

Through adolescence and into adulthood, Margaret was drawn to a variety of creative arts including musical theater, cuisine, jewelry design, drawing, painting, graphic design, and eventually metal-smithing and sculpting. 

In 2013 Margaret earned her Fine Arts degree from Skidmore College with a concentration in sculpture and metals. There, she began her training in two dimensional design, but quickly found herself drawn to three dimensional work. “It is one thing to paint space, but another to reach into space and shape something with my own hands. Once I had done that, there was no turning back.”

Margaret quickly became fascinated by the process of creating work in metal. “Working with metal for the first time completely changed my perception of the world. Here is this thing that is considered so strong and reliable; and with just a little bit of heat, it bends under my finger. Then with a lot more heat it becomes as liquid as water. That process of heating, and shaping in order to purify an idea and wrestle it to life speaks to me profoundly.”

Margaret now lives in Boulder Colorado, drawing much of her inspiration from the mountains. "I experience incredible wonder in nature. Especially in the mountains and forests. So I strive to create work that speaks to what I am enchanted by, in hopes that it allows the viewer to experience a little of that magic for themselves."

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.margaretthompsonsculpture.com. Also please follow the artist on Facebook as well as Instagram.


Want to share your work with Envision Magazine? Feel free to submit your visual art and/or literary works for a chance to be featured. Click here to apply online.

Traveler

TRAVELER

a poem by Alicia Minjarez

Translated by: Alaric Gutiérrez.

 

Untitled, 2016. Mobile photography, iPhone 6+. Ginger Cochran

Untitled, 2016. Mobile photography, iPhone 6+. Ginger Cochran

Redemptive breeze

imprisons my space,

like raining stars

as fragrant words

at the crescent moon,

salt conspires about

your shooting and lasting

existence.

 

Blue air flutter about

your wet

vertices notes,

ascending

through 

the tree’s essence.

Guttural sounds

spotting

the horizon.

 

I sense you

among murmurs

of leaves

diluting

liquid shadows,

imaginary

pigeon’s pieces,

luminescence music

of the dreams

we forge.

 

I find you,

wrong or right,

in haste;

in the rain’s

incessant voice.

Beautiful traveler

of dreamed steps

and arms of fire.

 

Drowned in

desire-scented steam

I dusk upon

foreign oaks,

as touch produced by

your path;

dark moor

of an old sky

reinvent

your word of light,

the illusory

copulation

of language.

 

Photo source: Alicia Minjarez

Photo source: Alicia Minjarez

About the author:

Alicia Minjarez: Poetess, Translator,  Singer, University Professor,  Broadcast locution Radio and T.V.


She was born in Tijuana, Mexico. She is an internationally renowned poetess and author who has won numerous awards including the EASAL medal by the European Academy of Sciences and Letters 2018 at Paris, France. Awarded "Pride of the Globe" WNWU, Kazakhstan 2018; Awarded with Honorable Mention in the category: Foreign Poetry, of the International Poetry Prize Poseidonia Paestrum, Edition XXIV, Italy 2018. Awarded "Universal Inspirational Poet", Pentasi B. World, India 2017; Winner of a special mention and a medal in the International Poetry Prize NOSSIDE Italy 2015, recognized by UNESCO.  Awarded with the IWA BOGDANI Albania Award, 2016. Awarded with the Third Place in French Poetry in the International Poetry Prize ‘Sous les traces de Léopold Sédar Senghor” at Milan, Italy, 2016 recognized by ONU and UNESCO.  Winner of a mention in the NOSSIDE Poetry Prize, Italy 2016. Awarded "Universal Inspirational Poet" Pentasi B. World, Africa, Ghana 2016.


She was considered among the International Poets published in the XXI Century World Literature Book released at New Delhi, India, 2016.  Her poems have been translated into: English, Albanian, French, Cameroonian, Arabic, Azerbaijan, Turkish, Chinese, Taiwanese, Portuguese, Polish and  Italian. And published in more than 140 International Anthologies, journals and magazines around the world.  


Want to share your work with Envision Magazine? Feel free to submit your visual art and/or literary works for a chance to be featured. Click here to apply online.

Emotional Rather Than Intellectual

“It is an emotional rather than intellectual process that determines whether I consider it a completed work.” - the artist

Psychedelic Garden, 2017. Acrylic, 12 x 12 inches, $530

Psychedelic Garden, 2017. Acrylic, 12 x 12 inches, $530

The abstract style gives me freedom to express my emotions. Years of traditional training at The Art Students League, The National Academy of Design and Pratt Graphics Center gave me a solid foundation in drawing, painting, and composition. I was encouraged to follow my instincts to work abstract when I took a color theory course with the painter, Wolf Kahn at the National Academy of Design, NYC. I also had two semesters of advanced color viscosity printing making at the NYU, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development where I worked in an abstract style.

Peace, 2018. Acrylic, 12 x 12 inches, $530

Peace, 2018. Acrylic, 12 x 12 inches, $530

When I begin a painting, I work with no preconceived idea. I start to lay in color on my paper or canvas. A completed painting develops by a series of revisions as I work with my palette knife and brush. As the paint, color and texture build the work begins to take on a life of its own. The work is finished only when it “feels” right to me. It is an emotional rather than intellectual process that determines whether I consider it a completed work.


Nature and my environment have always been a source of fascination and inspiration. I have a lifetime commitment to the creative process, and am not afraid of change or challenges. I grew up in New York City on Third Avenue in a tenement building. The deteriorated and chipped walls of the entrance looked like a painting. These images are used in the way I layer my work and build texture. Since 1970 Spain became a focal point for my artwork. The vast openness of the sea, sky and mountains where I maintain a home base is my sacred space.  Spending time out west at the Grand Canyon, Monument Valley, Zion and Bryce Parks has enriched my view of nature in a more spiritual way.

Spirit Within, 2019. Acrylic, 12 x 12 inches, $530

Spirit Within, 2019. Acrylic, 12 x 12 inches, $530

I admire artists from the Hudson River School to the Abstract Expressionists; however, my hero for the past decade is Richard Diebenkorn (1922-1993). Each time I view his work I come to understand the power of his use of color and composition. Other artists I admire are Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, and Helen Frankenthaler.


I have a long history with New York University. I graduated from School of Professional Studies, liberal arts degree program with a BA in art history with honors (1991); attended Graduate School of Arts and Science, John W. Draper Interdisciplinary Master’s Program in Humanities and Social Thought (1995) and worked fulltime as an administrator at NYU for eighteen years. In 2013, I began as a mentor at The Wasserman Center for Career Development and The Tisch School of Arts. Over the years, I have also curated and organized student art exhibitions at NYU’s The Bronfman Center for Jewish Student Life and the Kimball Commons Gallery. Since 1995, I teach in spring semester at NYU, School of Professional Studies, as an adjunct associate professor of arts in the Division of Applied Undergraduate Studies.

Al Andalus, 2017. Acrylic, 12 x 12 inches, $530

Al Andalus, 2017. Acrylic, 12 x 12 inches, $530

I worked in the music industry from 1964-1984. That was an education in itself…it was the Cultural Revolution. In 1964 at 18 years old, I worked at the American Guild of Variety Artists (AGVA) in the immigration department and prepared visas for the Beatles and Rolling Stones. I sold many painting and went to art classes after work. My life has never been boring. I live the life I love and share my enthusiasm for the creative process each day. I married a fellow artist, John Ferdico. We met at The Art Students League, NYC in 1978 and still share a studio in our apartment in Queens, NY.

Urban Flow, 2017. Acrylic, 10 x 10 inches, $430

Urban Flow, 2017. Acrylic, 10 x 10 inches, $430

My work has been exhibited in the U.S. and internationally. I participated in the U.S Art in Embassies Program and exhibited at the U.S. Embassy in Lima, Peru. For a number of years, I have work in Gallery 54, in Herefordshire, England, and in private and public collections. My intimate sized abstract work created by palette knife in acrylic on canvas/panel are bold and vivid. Color and texture are important elements in my work. Nature and memories are my inspiration.


Want to share your work with Envision Magazine? Feel free to submit your visual art and/or literary works for a chance to be featured. Click here to apply online.

A Modern Urban Material

“[My] aim is to create work that inspires, energizes and contributes to greater consciousness between the relationship of art and life.” - from the artist

Raw, 2018, Concrete, 25 x 43.5 x 13.5 inches, NFS

Raw, 2018, Concrete, 25 x 43.5 x 13.5 inches, NFS

DEANE MCGAHAN  (b. 1973) is a contemporary sculptor who currently resides and works in Seattle, Washington. Deane predominantly works in concrete and is drawn to the medium because it's a modern urban material that impacts everyone’s daily life.

Untitled, 2018, Concrete, 57.25 x 13.25 x 17.5 inches, NFS

Untitled, 2018, Concrete, 57.25 x 13.25 x 17.5 inches, NFS

With a background in digital 3D architecture, she started sculpting as a way to naturally shift from digital art to more tangible forms.  Her inspiration is fueled by the mediums flow of change, periods of instability and elements of risk. Primarily working with a monochromatic palette, her art visually captures the pressure of flow and movement in a moment in time.

Remnant, 2018, Concrete, 19 x 20 x 21.5 inches, NFS

Remnant, 2018, Concrete, 19 x 20 x 21.5 inches, NFS

With her innovative use of the medium, Deane begins each piece with creating an inverted mold. Working in opposing directions allows her to step outside her normal patterns of thought and see situations from different angles.  She then mixes concrete into a clay like consistency and presses the mixture directly into the mold.

Inversion, 2018, Concrete, 24 x 22 x 54.25 inches, NFS

Inversion, 2018, Concrete, 24 x 22 x 54.25 inches, NFS

With each piece she's able to manipulate and present the medium in new ways to help capture urban life in contemporary form.

Pendulum, 2018, Concrete, 38 x 17.5 x 16 inches, NFS

Pendulum, 2018, Concrete, 38 x 17.5 x 16 inches, NFS

Deane’s aim is to create work that inspires, energizes and contributes to greater consciousness between the relationship of art and life.

"Urban Forms" is my current body of work that is part of a procession of 8 pieces. The aim with this series is to present the viewer an engaging new way to view concrete as evolving material that is vital to the progression of our habitats. - the artist


Want to share your work with Envision Magazine? Feel free to submit your visual art and/or literary works for a chance to be featured. Click here to apply online.

Various Forms of Beauty

“I guess you could say that my goal is to express the emotional feelings of wonder and admiration of the world’s natural elements, events and occurrences and to have the viewer experience a different way of seeing.” - the artist

Bloom, 2018. Acrylic, pigment and resin, 48 x 60 inches

Bloom, 2018. Acrylic, pigment and resin, 48 x 60 inches

Q: What led you to become an artist?

A: I have always been curiously interested in the various forms of nature’s beauty, and how it can be found in every aspect of life.  As a young girl you would find me outdoors and going on explorations looking for rocks or other interesting things.  My grandmother, and accomplished artist, introduced me to oil painting at the age of 10 and I began studying in earnest.  I was considered a bit of a “nerd” by many and, in hindsight, I guess I was…I was the only member of the “Rock Club” in 5th grade…a Science Club studying minerals, rocks and gems…it was awesome!

I was also lucky to have a wonderful high school art teacher who mentored me and taught me about other mediums.  I went on to receive my BFA from Hartford Art School at The University of Hartford where I spent her time focusing on large scale sculptures and bold shapes and design.

Thalassic Series, Study I, 2018. Acrylic, pigment and resin, 48 x 48 inches

Thalassic Series, Study I, 2018. Acrylic, pigment and resin, 48 x 48 inches

Q: You work with poured medium and resin, as well as mixed media. Tell us how you became proficient in these mediums?

A; My training and studies were concentrated in oil and acrylic mediums and, until recently, I almost exclusively used acrylic pigments.  I had seen some resin work and became fascinated with the concept but was surprised by the overall lack of artistry that was involved.  On a whim, I purchased a couple of gallons to see what it was all about and have, pretty much, spent the last 3 years challenging myself to find beautiful and different ways to use it.  My work in the medium is constantly evolving as I experiment with a lot of different pigments, micas, paints, and stones in the resin.  And, I also now have quite the collection of power tools.  Every piece I create involves a variety of blow torches, heat guns, sanders, saws, rotary tools and, my favorite, my dremel.

Frozen River, Mini series, 2018. Acrylic, pigment, resin crushed glass, mirror and agate on canvas, 6 x 6 inches, set of four (SOLD)

Frozen River, Mini series, 2018. Acrylic, pigment, resin crushed glass, mirror and agate on canvas, 6 x 6 inches, set of four (SOLD)

Q: Where do you derive your inspiration from?

A: To this day, all of my artwork continues to be inspired by nature.  My admiration of minerals, stones, landmass and the sea has only grown stronger and, while many don’t see this in my abstract interpretations, it is always there. My art is multi-dimensional and is based on one or more of these elements while also attempting to capture some aspect of light, darkness, warmth, and convey my the feelings this evokes in me.

Title unknown, 2018. Acrylic, pigment and resin, 5 x 60 inches, set of three.

Title unknown, 2018. Acrylic, pigment and resin, 5 x 60 inches, set of three.

Q: You've developed quite a following for your stick sets. And it's quite a different and unusual size at 5" x 60". Tell us the reasoning behind this size selection and why you believe it is so popular?

A: These Sticks!!  It is funny how they came to be.  A collector of my art was challenged by a round wall in her foyer.  After many conversations about what art could be placed on a round wall in her home, we agreed that mirrors, “tall, skinny mirrors”, were the solution.  That somehow morphed into” tall, skinny art” and I made a commissioned set for her.  “Paint Sticks” is kind of a tongue-in-cheek name for them as they are really quite beautiful slices of fine art.  They have garnered a lot of interest and I am now spending quite a bit of time doing custom “Sticks” for clients and have introduced  “Twigs”.  I am not constricted to the 5” x 60” size as I am now working with a local artisan who is fabricating all of my structure which is handcrafted from kiln dried birch and pine and constructed in a way that will never warp or be compromised .  What is great about these is that they can be used in tall, narrow, rounded or otherwise awkward spaces,  They can be grouped together to create a beautiful montage, the uses are endless.  I mostly meet with clients at their homes, measure and then do them in the sizes that work best for their spaces.  Also, Frisco Fine Arts, is carrying an extensive collection of them. 

Meteor Shower Stick Set, 2018. Acrylic, pigment, resin crushed glass, mirror and agate on birch, 5 x 60 inches, set of three.

Meteor Shower Stick Set, 2018. Acrylic, pigment, resin crushed glass, mirror and agate on birch, 5 x 60 inches, set of three.

Q: Is there some underlying message you like to portray via your art? What do you hope for viewers to take away from your art?

A: There is no underlying message, per se, that I am trying to communicate with my art.  It is something that gives me a sense of peace and joy.  I guess you could say that my goal is to express the emotional feelings of wonder and admiration of the world’s natural elements, events and occurrences and to have the viewer experience a different way of seeing.  Maybe to pass along a bit of joy to them as well.

Spring I, 2018. Acrylic, pigment and resin, 48 x 48 inches

Spring I, 2018. Acrylic, pigment and resin, 48 x 48 inches

Q: How do you view your art career in five years?

A: Five years ago, I was still caring for my family and ending a totally different career and only painting in my spare time for myself.  I would never have imagined that I would be fortunate enough to begin a new career this late in life and have it be my lifelong passion.  So, 5 years from now?  Hard to say and I really don’t want to jinx myself.  So long as I’m still able to create, I will be a very content artist and person!

Photo credit: Deborah Hartigan Viestenz

Photo credit: Deborah Hartigan Viestenz

About the artist:

Much is revealed about Deborah Hartigan Viestenz through her artwork. Known for her large scale multi-media abstract paintings seeking to translate nature into feelings, Deborah is based in the United States and began her creative journey and love of the outdoors at an early age.

“We see these every day. Birds, grass, trees, lakes, oceans, stone. We are touched by these every day. Water on our hands and bodies. Sunlight warming our skin. Rocks and grass beneath our feet. Darkness making us seek light. We hear these every day. Birds speaking to each other. Wind rustling the leaves. The cacophony of storms and thunder. My goal is to express the emotional feelings of wonder and admiration of these natural elements, events and occurrences—to have the viewer experience a different way of seeing.“

Always fascinated with the often overlooked beauty of nature, and encouraged by her grandmother, an accomplished painter, Deborah began her studies in oil painting at the age of ten. Given her admiration of minerals, stones, landmass and the sea, these elements became the subject matter of her work. After attending Boston College, Deborah received her BFA from Hartford Art School at The University of Hartford where she spent her time focusing on large scale outdoor sculptures along with painting and design. She has spent her adult life achieving a successful and creative family/work/life balance and enjoying the gradual maturation and seasoning of her work. Presently based in Dallas, TX, Deborah has resided in New York, London, and Paris and continues to find inspiration in her travels.

Her art is exhibited/available at several galleries in Dallas, or on her website at www.dhvartworks.com. As you explore her works, share in the spirit of her imagination, generosity, and genuine love of life.


Want to share your work with Envision Magazine? Feel free to submit your visual art and/or literary works for a chance to be featured. Click here to apply online.

River As Meditation

River As Meditation

a poem by Dah Helmer

 

How elegant the river flows

near giant boulders that rest

like shaved heads.

 

We come to know these things

by simple names,

sky, clouds, this river

inside the valley, moving

its golden vein,

with tree stumps, like dark fists,

holding the shore.

 

Inside this great vision

water is everywhere

with its intelligent run

to the ocean, dragging bones,

possum, puma, pulling them

like broken god parts

 


Photo credit: Juliet Menrae

Photo credit: Juliet Menrae

About the author:

Dah’s seventh poetry collection is Something Else’s Thoughts (Transcendent Zero Press) and his poems have been published by editors from the US, UK, Ireland, Canada, Spain, Singapore, Philippines, Poland, Australia, Africa, and India. He is a Pushcart Prize and Best Of The Net nominee and the lead editor of the poetry critique group, The Lounge.


Dah lives in Berkeley, California, where he is working on his eighth book of poetry.


Want to share your work with Envision Magazine? Feel free to submit your visual art and/or literary works for a chance to be featured. Click here to apply online.

A Record of Conscious Thought

“Using paint alone as a medium was very disenchanting.” - the artist

Interdimensional Landscape I, 2017, Collage on wooden board, 8 x 10 inches, $350

Interdimensional Landscape I, 2017, Collage on wooden board, 8 x 10 inches, $350

Q: What led you to become a mixed media / assemblage artist?

A: I took a collage class in my junior year in college. Soon after, it became my favorite medium to work with and now it is my prime focus. Though initially a painting major, I did not paint much (and still don't). Using paint alone as a medium was very disenchanting. At the time, I had interest in learning as many mediums as possible. Collage was very freeing from the rules of traditional art making and structured art classes.

Untitled, 2018, Collage on paper, 5 x 7 inches, $175

Untitled, 2018, Collage on paper, 5 x 7 inches, $175

Q: Where have you studied and how long have you been an artist?

A: I took graphic communications at my vocational high school before I studied fine arts at a community college. Afterwards, I transferred to Montserrat College of Art my sophomore year where I recently received my Bachelors. Art has always been an interest of mine ever since I picked up my first crayon. I have always been introverted, so it is how I felt most comfortable expressing myself.

Untitled, 2017, Collage on paper, 10 x 12 inches, $200

Untitled, 2017, Collage on paper, 10 x 12 inches, $200

Q: Where do you derive your inspiration from?

A: I derive a lot of my inspiration from multiple things. Mostly from self awareness, altered states of consciousness, the divine feminine, polarities, and channeling the dark side of human nature: that being, fears, the social masks we wear, multiple personas, as well as mental health. Though my work is really personal, I also explore external conflicts such as sexual liberation, body politics, power structures, and cultural identity. Though some of these concepts might not be too evident in my work at the moment, it is what I have been interested in lately and wish to integrate more into my work.

Some of my favorite artists, not in any particular order and ranging in various mediums are Robert Rauschenberg, Max Ernst, Ana Mendieta, Hans Bellmer, Wangechi Mutu, Claude Cahun, Steven Stapleton, John O`Reilly, Man Ray, Cosey Fanni Tutti, Valie Export, Herman Kitsch, Tatsumi Hijikata. Some artists who I admire that I discovered through social media are Katrien De Blauwer, Brittany Markert, Nedda Afsari, Miss Meatface, Denis Forkas, Krist Mort. I could go on.

Distorted Room, 2018, Collage on paper, 11 x 14 inches, $120

Distorted Room, 2018, Collage on paper, 11 x 14 inches, $120

Q: Where do you gain your mixed media materials from?

A: The materials I use in my collages and assemblages are mostly disposed paper or objects that I find on the ground when I walk my dogs. I love going to thrift shops and antique stores to pick up small knick-knacks. I find value in these forgotten objects and I like to integrate their history into my work. Not only can they be aesthetically pleasing but the objects also work as personal symbols. My black and white collages are cut out from various photography books, where I take apart figures and landscapes to distort them and turn them into something new. Working with these given forms not only gives me direction but I feel like I can relate to the work I am manipulating better.

Untitled, 2018, Collage & wax on vintage album, 8.5 x 10.5 inches, $135

Untitled, 2018, Collage & wax on vintage album, 8.5 x 10.5 inches, $135

Q: What do you hope for viewers to take away from your art?

A: When people come across my work, I want it to be a visual stimulant that guides them to looking into themselves. Self awareness, in my opinion, is not only about finding inner peace and joy or any of that nonsense, but also exploring parts of yourself that you are afraid to confront. I just want people to relate and feel something on a deeper level.

Interdimensional Landscape II, 2017, Collage on wooden board, 5 x 7 inches, $300

Interdimensional Landscape II, 2017, Collage on wooden board, 5 x 7 inches, $300

Q: How do you view your art career in five years?

A: In five years, I see myself living in a setting with an art scene that actually invests more in contemporary artists. I do not expect art to be my main source of income, though that would be nice. I want to be more involved and collaborate with other artists to create work that has an impact on viewers.

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About the artist:

I am a multimedia artist with a main focus on collaging, more specifically black and white photo montaging and assemblages. My collages work as a formal and psychological exercise to present a record of conscious thought and action. I take found photographs out of discarded photography books and cut up representational forms into indistinguishable abstractions, while incorporating found objects and rearranging them into something new. By using a given/found image or form, I am taking materials with a history of its own and applying that to my own personal experience. In analyzing and modifying a fleeting impression, I constantly put myself into unfamiliar places whilst being aware of what I discover.


This process allows me to understand my decision making. It is a metaphorical alchemy of tapping into the unconscious mind: transcendence through breaking apart and reconstructing what I think I know and turning it into something new. The fragmented glimpses visible in my collages, appearing much like inter-dimensional landscapes or obscured cinematic figures look to channel the polarities between the mind and body.


The process of my work refers the struggle between self-knowledge, self-deception and acknowledges that we are in a constant state of recreating ourselves, which is reflected in how I keep my work in a flux. My work explores mental and physical pain and the pleasure of indulgence, desire and apathy; the relationship between subject and object; the harmony of the creator`s control; and chaos or creation.


Though my work may be personal, I do reflect on external issues at times such as using parts of the figure as a tool to explore body politics, transgression, censorship, power structures, and cultural identity.


Want to share your work with Envision Magazine? Feel free to submit your visual art and/or literary works for a chance to be featured. Click here to apply online.

For a Tree

A poem by Doug King

Untitled, 2018. Pastel on rice paper. Doug King

Untitled, 2018. Pastel on rice paper. Doug King

For a tree

to sit quietly

is no chore at all

Whether in the sun

or where there is none

there is no worry

Amongst its friends

the love it sends

together they flourish

After a time

one might find

their lives have

intertwined

Photo credit: Doug King

Photo credit: Doug King

About the author / artist:

Doug King is a talented artist, writer and film-maker living and working in Dallas, TX. He is currently Editor-in-Chief for Dallas Style and Design Magazine and continues to write freelance in addition to painting.

To view more of his art work, follow him on Instagram @dougking5150. For information on film / screenplay and publishing, please visit www.dayiiiprod.com.


Want to share your work with Envision Magazine? Feel free to submit your visual art and/or literary works for a chance to be featured. Click here to apply online.

My Worlds of Imagination

“I enjoy translating my worlds of imagination onto the canvas, a whimsical fantasy world to immerse viewers in.” - the artist

Carousel Dreams, 2016, acrylic 30 x 24 inches, $800

Carousel Dreams, 2016, acrylic 30 x 24 inches, $800

I enjoy translating my worlds of imagination onto the canvas, a whimsical fantasy world to immerse viewers in. I generally want them to have a fun visual experience; in some respects, not so different from 'Where's Waldo'. 

A Garden of Vivid Visions, 2018, acrylic, 30 x 30 inches, $850

A Garden of Vivid Visions, 2018, acrylic, 30 x 30 inches, $850

 This is by no means a rule, but it's something I feel naturally inclined to pursue, as it's very creatively fulfilling and freeing to create imaginary worlds. I like to experiment and evolve my craft, not putting myself in a box. 

Vigilance, 2018, acrylic, 20 x 16 inches, $450

Vigilance, 2018, acrylic, 20 x 16 inches, $450

I started to paint in 2016, having taken a college course with a motivating instructor that encouraged to continue pursuing art. So I did, and have no regrets.

Mills of Nature, 2018, acrylic, 14 x 18 inches $450

Mills of Nature, 2018, acrylic, 14 x 18 inches $450

To learn more about the artist and view more work, please visit www.paintingsbyfrancois.com. Please also follow the artist on Facebook and Instagram.


Want to share your work with Envision Magazine? Feel free to submit your visual art and/or literary works for a chance to be featured. Click here to apply online.