sculpture

They Named Her John

Fleeting, 2019, Stoneware, acrylic paint & charred wood panel, 14 x 14, $1,200

Fleeting, 2019, Stoneware, acrylic paint & charred wood panel, 14 x 14, $1,200

Jessica’s early years were spent in Upstate New York and Houston. The daughter of an engineer and a photographer, she grew up in her father’s workshop and her mother’s darkroom.

The One v.3, 2019, porcelain, charred wood panel & thread, 12 x 12, $1,200

The One v.3, 2019, porcelain, charred wood panel & thread, 12 x 12, $1,200

When she wasn’t busy there, she could usually be found exploring the woods or making dirt bowls on the muddy banks of the stream near her house.

No End, 2018, Stoneware, 9 x 5 x 2.5, $750

No End, 2018, Stoneware, 9 x 5 x 2.5, $750

The submitted mixed media works are part of a series of pieces that explore permanence, the passage of time, memory and nostalgia.

Obligations, 2019, porcelain & charred wood panel, 12 x 12, $1,200

Obligations, 2019, porcelain & charred wood panel, 12 x 12, $1,200

Jessica’s ceramic work focuses on cultivating a quiet purity of form with a nod to the strong decisive lines of the industrial machinery she grew up with in her father’s workshop. Her ceramics bring together the soft elegance of wheel-thrown forms with contrasting stark graphic surfaces.

The One v.8, 2018, Stoneware & Acrylic Paint, 18 x 24, $1,800

The One v.8, 2018, Stoneware & Acrylic Paint, 18 x 24, $1,800

Through her work, Jessica seeks to illuminate the subtlety of human interactions, to highlight the tension between our physical separateness and our emotional connectedness.

The One v. 4, 2018, stoneware, acrylic paint, charred wood panel and thread, 20 x 24, $1,800

The One v. 4, 2018, stoneware, acrylic paint, charred wood panel and thread, 20 x 24, $1,800

Photo source: the artist

Photo source: the artist

About the artist:

Jessica earned a BA in Studio Art at The University of Texas Austin and, while working professionally as a graphic designer, has continued to work with ceramics for over 20 years. Currently Jessica works out of her home studio in Houston, TX.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.theynamedherjohn.com, as well as www.facebook.com/theynamedherjohn. You may also follow the artist on Instagram @they_named_her_john.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Natural Aspects with Human Interventions

“My stone sculptures tend to be a balance of natural aspects with human interventions.” - the artist

CLOUD HANDS I, 1994, 11 feet sq, SOLD

CLOUD HANDS I, 1994, 11 feet sq, SOLD

Jon Barlow Hudson has been creating large scale sculpture projects for public environments since 1976, in 27 countries round the world: 23 throughout China alone. This has provided him with a uniquely broad experience of art & sculpture in many different cultural & architectural contexts.

“My 1st % for art project, POLARIS, was for Miami/Dade in 1979, for Homestead Public Library: soon followed by VINCULUM AMORIS for S. Regional Court in Hollywood, FL.” - the artist

DOUBLE HELIX, 2010, 25' L x 8' H, SOLD

DOUBLE HELIX, 2010, 25' L x 8' H, SOLD

I work on any scale, in a wide range of materials, in various motifs & types of installation. While many of my projects have been in various kinds of metal such as stainless steel, I especially like working with stone. Many of my large scale projects have involved working with various types of clients in both early & later stages, sometimes developing a project with them. Virtually all have been designed with their intended sites uppermost in mind, within budget & on schedule. While most are stand-alone, several have been atrium installations and wall mounted: a couple have been fountains.

FENESTRAE AETERNITATIS: BOOKS INTO INFINITY, 2013, 18’ L, SOLD

FENESTRAE AETERNITATIS: BOOKS INTO INFINITY, 2013, 18’ L, SOLD

My sculpture projects tend to be abstract, often geometric in 1 way or another. Certain projects might have more literal, humanistic or figurative aspects such as my ETRUSCAN MAENAD series, inspired by a bronze figurine in the Fiesole museum. My stone sculptures tend to be a balance of natural aspects with human interventions. My sculpture may be seen as iconic for the most part, or symbolic, very often referencing a center, whether actual or spatial.

ETRUSCAN MAENAD-MOTHER BEAR, 2012, life size. SOLD

ETRUSCAN MAENAD-MOTHER BEAR, 2012, life size. SOLD

It often works with balance; space in contrast with form; implied space; ambiguity if incorporating mirror surfaces; light & darkness; a continuum, implied or actual; movement & flow such as a vortex; interior & exterior; natural/organic with man-made. I always thoroughly research a given project & create a sculpture or project that speaks to the pertinent characteristics of the situation, whether cultural, environmental or architectural.

TREE OF KNOWLEDGE, 1992, Bronze, 10' H, SOLD

TREE OF KNOWLEDGE, 1992, Bronze, 10' H, SOLD

This is a collection of commissioned public art projects. I have several various other options relative to type of work and choices of the works can be themed.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.hudsonsculpture.art.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

One With Nature

“Every day I carve wood. I'm experimentation. I am one with nature.” - the artist

Dance. 2019. Wood + epoxy. 34 cm x 26.5 cm x 4.5 cm, $450

Dance. 2019. Wood + epoxy. 34 cm x 26.5 cm x 4.5 cm, $450

First work - sculpture "Dance"

In this sculpture it was my goal to find the point of the fall—that moment when the stable support of the dance partner succumbs to the force of gravity.

I let the epoxy run free and connect the two pieces of wood as two people are connected through dance. It’s like an energy that they are sharing.

The epoxy bends, folds and flows like the skin at the joints of a body in movement. And the gold beneath the “skin” is like true treasure inside the hearts and souls of the dancers.

The work was inspired after participating in an art/dance workshop in Vladimir where dancers explored partnering and “movie dance”.

Fall. 2018. Wood + epoxy. 32 cm х 30 cm х 3.5 cm. $400

Fall. 2018. Wood + epoxy. 32 cm х 30 cm х 3.5 cm. $400

Second work - sculpture “Fall”

In this work I wanted to capture the moment of fear and sadness, when you realize that Fall is here. I wanted to capture the time that passes during this period of the year and one’s feelings about that passing of time.
Every year I find myself dreading the coming sadness of Fall, and I think this is visible in the piece.

About the artist:

I've been woodcarving since I entered a Moscow woodcarving school in 2012. My unique woodcarving technique is in part based on what I learned there.

I'm currently an art student at Stroganov Academy of art in Moscow. In 2016, I participated at the International handicraft exhibition in Lisbon, Portugal and 2019 participated in workshop in Vladimir, Russia.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.russianwoodcarving.com/home-1. You may also follow the artist on Facebook at www.facebook.com/russianwoodcarving, as well as Instagram @maria_woodcarver.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Exploring Abstract Form

“I am the same in the arts as I am with life and learning, inquisitive and driven.” - the artist

Arch, 2019, Fine Silver Metal Clay 925 Sterling Silver Amethyst and Tanzanite £165

Arch, 2019, Fine Silver Metal Clay 925 Sterling Silver Amethyst and Tanzanite £165

I have completed both self-directed practice and courses studying the arts, including an Access Art and Design Diploma and Art and Media Bachelor of Arts with Honors. Since gaining these two qualifications, I have created mixed media paintings and metal clay jewellery designs side by side.

Malestrom, 2019, Acrylic Paint Spray Paint and Graphite, 63 x 63 cm, £400

Malestrom, 2019, Acrylic Paint Spray Paint and Graphite, 63 x 63 cm, £400

These two different mediums share more characteristics than people often think, with one medium directly inspiring the other with the subject of landscapes a unifying factor. Additionally I have constantly been exploring abstract form and colour in my mixed media paintings, crossing over to my metal clay designs.

Barnes Green, 2019, Fine Silver Metal Clay 925 Sterling Silver Peridot and Malachite, £165

Barnes Green, 2019, Fine Silver Metal Clay 925 Sterling Silver Peridot and Malachite, £165

All of my artworks are directly inspired by landscapes and are influenced by my thought processes, emotions and mood at the time of creation. My artworks create an open dialogue of my experiences, thoughts, feelings akin to a visual diary, a representation of who I am and the way I processes my life and the world around me.

Commotion, 2018, Mixed media, 101 x 101 cm, £850

Commotion, 2018, Mixed media, 101 x 101 cm, £850

My work can be purchased through eight representative galleries, including Degreeart.com Gallery, Nude Tin Can Gallery, Riverside Gallery & Framing and Art in the Heart Gallery. I have coupled my artistic practice with exploring my passion for writing, which enables me present my work in a number of international print and online publications, including Art and Museum Magazine, Creativ Paper Magazine, Artist Talk Magazine and Iris Art Magazine.

Urban Elegance, 2019, Fine Silver Metal Clay Pink Tourmaline Ruby and Purple Sapphire, 1.8 x 1 x 2.1 cm

Urban Elegance, 2019, Fine Silver Metal Clay Pink Tourmaline Ruby and Purple Sapphire, 1.8 x 1 x 2.1 cm

My artist practice is a reflection of who I am, which has always been a deep love and is something that is a part of my identity.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.lheart.co.uk, as well as www.facebook.com/laurahelliottart. You may also follow the artist on Instagram @laurahelliottart.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Between Soft and Rigid

“…found objects not only lose their original function but also can not be clearly defined anymore.” - the artist

Bergmann, 2019, garments, braided hose, earrings, thread, 41 x 21 x 9 in, 2300$

Bergmann, 2019, garments, braided hose, earrings, thread, 41 x 21 x 9 in, 2300$

Initially coming from painting, Anna-Lena Sauer’s latest work increasingly focuses on the exploration of different kinds of material, ranging from natural and synthetic textiles to plastics and paint.

Remix 4, 2019, bunting bag, nylon and thread, 10 x 11 x 11 in, 950$

Remix 4, 2019, bunting bag, nylon and thread, 10 x 11 x 11 in, 950$

In her abstract material paintings and sculptures the artist re-utilizes every-day objects such as garments, fabric scraps, broken soccer balls, garden hoses and packaging materials.

Wall Pillow 1, 2018, nylon, fabric scraps and acrylic paint on canvas, 12 x 12 x 2.5 in, 850$

Wall Pillow 1, 2018, nylon, fabric scraps and acrylic paint on canvas, 12 x 12 x 2.5 in, 850$

Liberated from their familiar context and included in a work of art, the found objects not only lose their original function but also can not be clearly defined anymore. Sauer uses them as an artistic medium, a substitute for paint or clay to give texture and plasticity to her work.

Remix 6, 2019, faux fur and found object, 7 x 5 inches, 900$

Remix 6, 2019, faux fur and found object, 7 x 5 inches, 900$

Of particular interest is the juxtaposition of contrasting materials and their different properties as well as the interaction of texture, color, line, shape and space as autonomous key elements. The experimentation with material reveals ongoing tensions between softness and rigidity, disclosure and concealment, tenseness and release.

Peccadillo, 2019, faux fur, fabric scraps and nylon on stretcher bars, 13 x 12.5 x 6 in, 850$

Peccadillo, 2019, faux fur, fabric scraps and nylon on stretcher bars, 13 x 12.5 x 6 in, 850$

Sauer intends to activate seeing. The perception of her work is an engaging process challenging the observer’s attention and patience in times of rapid media consumption.

Wall Sculpture 23, 2019, fabric scraps, nylon, zipper and garments on canvas, 12 x 12 x 3.5 in, 850$

Wall Sculpture 23, 2019, fabric scraps, nylon, zipper and garments on canvas, 12 x 12 x 3.5 in, 850$

Anna-Lena Sauer profile pic.jpg

About the artist:

In my abstract material art, I am re-utilizing broken or outworn garments and textiles. I use them as an artistic medium, a substitute for paint or clay to give texture and plasticity to my work.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.annalenasauerartist.com. You nay also follow the artist on Facebook at de-de.facebook.com/AnnaLenaSauerArtist, as well as Instagram @annalenasauerartist.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Patterns of Consumption

“What happens when we acknowledge the long-term consequences of our patterns of consumption?” - the artist

Refuse I (Ordures I), 2016, hand-carved sculpture, found Linden wood and used motor oil patina, 50 cm x 1m 20 x 1m 20 cm. $5000

Refuse I (Ordures I), 2016, hand-carved sculpture, found Linden wood and used motor oil patina, 50 cm x 1m 20 x 1m 20 cm. $5000

Q: What led you to become a sculptor?

A: I grew up as a child of two architects and seeing space as something malleable came naturally to me. I started making sculptures as soon as I had access to considerable amounts of clay. I am drawn to the medium’s ability to evoke the body’s physical presence and am also really interested in using materials to ask questions about what we, as a society, build and what we discard.

Refuse II (Ordures II), 2016, hand-carved sculpture, found Linden wood and used motor oil patina, 40 cm x 1m 20 x 1m. $5000

Refuse II (Ordures II), 2016, hand-carved sculpture, found Linden wood and used motor oil patina, 40 cm x 1m 20 x 1m. $5000

Q: What inspired the collection you submitted?

A: Refuse I-V is a series of 5 hand-carved works from found Linden wood (cut during the redevelopment of a public park in the Cité des Francs-Moisins in Saint-Denis, France). The idea for the sculptures came about after seeing the raw materials – huge tree trunks – lying on the ground outside my art studio. When I asked the workers in the area whether the trees has been sick, they indicated that they were actually healthy; there was no environmental reason to cut them down!

Refuse III (Ordures III), 2016, hand-carved sculpture, found Linden wood and used motor oil patina, 1 m x 1m x 50 cm. $5000

Refuse III (Ordures III), 2016, hand-carved sculpture, found Linden wood and used motor oil patina, 1 m x 1m x 50 cm. $5000

Q: Can you describe the materials you used and your creative process?

A: I decided to sculpt forms that were capable of expressing the visceral disgust I felt upon seeing old trees handled in this manner. I worked on the piece in 2015, the year leading up to the Cop21 United Nations Climate Change conference, which took place in Paris. I first made a series of sketches of actual black plastic waste bags, then sculpted small models out of clay that I cast in plaster. I used these as references for the actual sculptures which I carved using a variety of saws and hand tools. For the sculptures, I selected the largest pieces of wood I had available, which were from the midpoints of the bases of the trees. These were areas where the trunk “branched out” with one trunk splitting into two. From these form, I was able to sculpt a series of pairs of plastic bags, in different configurations.

Refuse IV (Ordures IV), 2016, hand-carved sculpture, found Linden wood and used motor oil patina, 60 cm x 1m 50 x 70 cm. $5000

Refuse IV (Ordures IV), 2016, hand-carved sculpture, found Linden wood and used motor oil patina, 60 cm x 1m 50 x 70 cm. $5000

Q: We were impressed with your Best in Show piece, titled Refuse III, as well as the rest of the collection. Tell us more about this piece/series.

A: Each “couple” of bags in the series comes from one initial piece of wood. The variety of postures can be seen as metaphors for different relationships or different moments in a single relationship, with each bag supporting the other in different ways. The black patina on the sculptures involves used motor oil and each sculpture evokes our use of natural resources on the level of form and subject matter.

Refuse V (Ordures V), 2016, hand-carved sculpture, found Linden wood and used motor oil patina, 40 cm x 1m 20 x 1m. $5000

Refuse V (Ordures V), 2016, hand-carved sculpture, found Linden wood and used motor oil patina, 40 cm x 1m 20 x 1m. $5000

Q: What do you hope for viewers to take away from your work?

A: I hope the works encourage viewers to reflect on what we produce and why. A banal trash bag is rarely a subject matter that is lavished with so much detailed attention, in art. At the same time, these bags serve a vital function in modern life, keeping garbage out of site and out of mind. What happens when we acknowledge the long-term consequences of our patterns of consumption? What happens when we honor and respect all forms of nature, and not just human life?

Refuse VI (Ordures VI), 2016, hand-carved sculpture, found Linden wood and used motor oil patina, 50 cm x 1m 20 x 1m 20 cm. $5000

Refuse VI (Ordures VI), 2016, hand-carved sculpture, found Linden wood and used motor oil patina, 50 cm x 1m 20 x 1m 20 cm. $5000

Q: How do you view your art career in five years?

A: I hope to continue to show my work at home and abroad in galleries and institutional settings. In addition to making sculptures and drawings in the studio, I also make large-scale outdoor sculptures and I enjoy the challenge of producing new work for specific public contexts. In the next few years, I hope to connect with new partners, collaborators, and collectors that are interested in supporting my practice.

Photo source: the artist

Photo source: the artist

About the artist:

My work begins and ends in the human body. Our remnants (what we cast off and leave behind in the form of waste, trash, memory etc.) ground and connect us to the earth. My work asks where the things in our lives come from and where they go once we’ve used them. By representing and re-animating remains, I explore the potential of materials to ask questions and to evoke larger environmental relationships.

I treat the products of our culture as physical remains of our bodies and explore how we generate objects as physical extensions of ourselves. With man-made forms, materials, and processes, I extend, inhibit, and modify elements of the human body. I reuse, up-cycle, and revalue regular, standardized, and mass-produced materials into something one-of-a-kind and special to invert the associations we make with different types of detritus. My raw materials are manufactured products with a particular use history and product life cycle. Whether bastardized industrially produced goods in the white cube or surreal interventions in public spaces, my work explores the limits of functionality and worth.

I give a human dimension to physical sites by foregrounding their historical/narrative aspects and input human features into sterile goods by cutting, breaking, gluing, and carving them into forms that evoke the human body. These artworks are at once physical things and conceptual spaces. Through the physical labor and limitations of my own body, I questions which bodies are present and missing in political and cultural discourses. I explore the anatomical potential of the female body as a material metaphor for our actions that ask viewers whether our current situation is fixed or not and how change can emerge.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.


Soft and Hard Elements

“I am driven by my relentless urge to describe feelings through materiality.” - the artist

Salvaged, 2017, Canvas and thread, 5 x 5 inches, $200

Salvaged, 2017, Canvas and thread, 5 x 5 inches, $200

Conceptually, my work is based on the tension or the stagnation that is generated through managing emotional balance.  The journey is never smooth; therefore, I aim to capture the varying stages that emerge.

Fortitude, 2017, Industrial felt, nails, and window screening, 24 x 24 x 20 inches, $800

Fortitude, 2017, Industrial felt, nails, and window screening, 24 x 24 x 20 inches, $800

Materially, I am inspired by soft and hard elements clashing together; the transformation of weird or ugly things into something that is delicate and perceived as beautiful; and the act of stitching and binding elements. Ultimately, I hope to evoke an alluring outcome from the pain.

Layered, 2017, Polyester organza and embroidery thread, 10 x 14 inches, $500

Layered, 2017, Polyester organza and embroidery thread, 10 x 14 inches, $500

As a sculptural fiber and materials artist, I am drawn to the transformation of flexible materials.  My work tends to be varied in appearance but it focuses around the central theme of hard against soft, which is the physical embodiment of maintaining emotional balance.

Renewed, 2016, vinyl, hand dyed monofilament, thread, poly-fil, and plywood, 12 x 24 x 96 inches, $1500

Renewed, 2016, vinyl, hand dyed monofilament, thread, poly-fil, and plywood, 12 x 24 x 96 inches, $1500

About the artist:

Liz Hamilton Quay is the Assistant Professor of Textiles and Material Studies at Kutztown University. She followed her passion for the manipulation of fabric to earn her MFA at Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia in Fibers and Material Studies. Her journey began at Kutztown University, where she proudly received her bachelor’s degree in Art Education and a BFA in Craft, concentrating in Fibers. Her creative approach is based on her natural curiosity for materials and a joy for making. Through a variety of techniques ranging from traditional fibers to digital formats such as video, she creates work that explores innate visceral feelings. Her work has been featured in venues such as, Ceres Gallery | New York, Excellence in Fibers online gallery through Fiber Art Now publications, and awarded first prize in “other media” at the AAH 90th Annual International Juried Exhibition.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.lizhamiltonquay.com. You may also follow the artist on Instagram @lizhamiltonquay.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.


Pillow Talk

“Clothes as memory, memory as paper, Paper as human, human as a book.” - the artist

Pillowtalk, 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

Pillowtalk, 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

Pillowtalk is a book that contains the moments and thoughts of my relationships as a homosexual male who grows up in traditional Chinese culture. There was no chance for me to express my thoughts of relationship but during the night. The longing and missing love have inspired me to create this work.

Pillowtalk (detail 1), 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

Pillowtalk (detail 1), 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

This book is bound in chain stitch of handmade paper with found texts with individual sheets of papers records the unspoken words. This pink paper was handmade out of linear cotton fiber and filling cotton for the pillows, and I stamped an invisible “I love you” mark.

Pillowtalk (detail 2), 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

Pillowtalk (detail 2), 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

The pillow is the listener of my desires of love and the witness of my relationships. The purple papers were made of my boyfriends’ clothes, and I stamped my ex-boyfriends' name in faded silver and have my current boyfriend’s name in bold gold.

Pillowtalk (detail 3), 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

Pillowtalk (detail 3), 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

The cloth is second skin we have, it holds the memory that we remember and contains the moments that intrigue us. By making the clothes into papers, the memories have been stored in a book.

Pillowtalk (detail 4), 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

Pillowtalk (detail 4), 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

I am a contemporary bookbinder who works with multimedia book arts. Reconstructing the fibers into a sheet of paper, reconstructing the container of the memories.

Pillowtalk (detail 5), 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

Pillowtalk (detail 5), 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

To view more work by the artist, please visit zhefuwan.com. You may also follow the artist on Facebook at www.facebook.com/zhefuwan, as well as Instagram @jacobzwan.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Art and Science

“The whole creative process is an endless research of topics, materials, reading of modern philosophy, scientific literature and thinking about the future in the context of ecology and modern technologies.” - the artists, Lilia Li-Mi-Yan & Katherina Sadovsky

Object 01, panel made of recycled plastic, 1500 x 1000 sm, $3000

Object 01, panel made of recycled plastic, 1500 x 1000 sm, $3000

Q: What led you both to become concept sculptors?

A: We came to contemporary art from photography. [We] both graduated from Rodchenko Art School (Moscow), [in] the course of documentary photography. We were looking and searching a lot and, in different works, turned to different media. Sculpture is only one of the languages for a contemporary artist.

Bacteria 02, 2018, print on plastic, 70 x 50 sm, $300

Bacteria 02, 2018, print on plastic, 70 x 50 sm, $300

Q: What inspired the collection you submitted?

A: Two years ago, we were at the art-residency on Lake Baikal. With all the beauty and greatness that we were contemplating every day, we also observed piles of plastic garbage, which tourists left behind. We realized that humans use the resources of nature with unthinkable carelessness — abuse and traumatize it!

After the residency, we completed two exhibitions – “Plastic x-ray”, in the Olkhon Forest, and “Marmor”, in the abandoned marble quarry. We gently incorporated our art-works into nature.

Back in Moscow, we could no longer remain indifferent to the problem of plastic waste. We started the activists’ movement – collecting plastic at the territory of museums, art and educational institutions. We called our project “Where is my plastic bag?”.  It consists of three parts: the collection of plastic, its recycling and processing, and creation of sculptures from the processed material.

The work "Bacteria" is the result of testing of material in the conditions of our studio. We were developing the idea of the bacteria modified by scientists that will help to solve the problem of plastic waste by eating it.

Bacteria 03, 2018, print on plastic, 70 x 50 sm, $300

Bacteria 03, 2018, print on plastic, 70 x 50 sm, $300

Q: Can you describe the types of materials you use and your creative process?

A: Today, our materials are recycled items or recycled materials that were first sent to landfill as garbage. Now we are working with different types of plastics, and in the next project, we want to try to work with glass, also recycled.

The whole creative process is an endless research of topics, materials, reading of modern philosophy, scientific literature and thinking about the future in the context of ecology and modern technologies.

Bacteria 10, 2018, print on plastic, 70 x 50 sm, $300

Bacteria 10, 2018, print on plastic, 70 x 50 sm, $300

Q: We were very impressed with your Best in Show piece, titled Bacteria 10, as well as the rest of the Bacteria group. Tell us more about this piece/series.

A: Bacteria are a small visual part of the project about plastic in the modern world. We want create a collaboration with the scientists researching polymers. Bacteria are something like new organisms formed under a layer of plastic that is buried in the soil and in the ocean. It is like evolution, the creation of a new life. We know so little about it.

Object 02, panel made of recycled plastic, 1500 x 1000 sm, $3000

Object 02, panel made of recycled plastic, 1500 x 1000 sm, $3000

Q: What do you hope for viewers to take away from your work?

A: Our project “Where is my bag?” implies [activism] from our side. We all understand that art does not solve the questions, but to raise the question and let reflect on it is in our power. And if each of us will begin to treat the planet with a bit more of responsibility - that will be our contribution.

Object 03, panel made of recycled plastic, 1500 x 1000 sm, $3000

Object 03, panel made of recycled plastic, 1500 x 1000 sm, $3000

Q: How do you view your art career in five years?

A;: We are going to continue to work at the intersection of art and science, to look for new materials, new statements. After all, there are so many problems in this world, that we won’t be able to stay without work!

Photo source: the artists

Photo source: the artists

About the artists:

Li-Mi-Yan & Sadovsky - a duo of Russian artists Lilia Li-Mi-Yan (1971) and Katherina Sadovsky (1985). They’ve been working together since 2016. Their versatile approach to art practice covers such artistic media as photography, painting, sculpture, photo books, installation, video, sound, interference in to public and natural spaces, social work to collect plastic waste in Moscow.

Li-mi-yan & Sadovsky explore internal human and social topics, which can be called problems. The question of death, of human violence against other human, against nature, against oneself, as if it erases the boundary between reality   – where is actually alive, and where is dead? Artists critically analyze these issues, inconveniently intruding into nature with digital images on polymeric materials, comparing this art gesture with the physical and mental trauma of all mankind.

Artists wonder why the cruel online pictures of victims of wars, terrorist attacks, diseases do not horrify the viewer anymore. The image of suffering follows someone's joyful holiday photo  and almost equivalent to the user of social networks. Thus, any picture splits and loses its original meaning. Li-Mi-Yan & Sadovsky allegedly play with death, reproducing severe injuries with the help of plastic and naive drawings in portraits with ideal faces, psychologically affecting the viewer in their own way of trauma.

To learn more about the artists and view their work, please visit limiyan.com/blog.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Search for Equilibrium

“The process of making and the process of thinking. Repetition as a way to transform.” - the artist

A Point of Balance, 2019, Yarn fabric and glue, approximately 51 x 15 x 15 inches, $400

A Point of Balance, 2019, Yarn fabric and glue, approximately 51 x 15 x 15 inches, $400

It’s all about the process. The process of making and the process of thinking.
Repetition as a way to transform.

I sit for hours crocheting, as a private protest against a stressful society,
or as a meaningless time-killer while waiting for change. A feeling of impuissance.

Will people wake up before it’s too late?

Balance in Between, 2019, Yarn and glue, approximately 61 x 35 x 35 inches, $400

Balance in Between, 2019, Yarn and glue, approximately 61 x 35 x 35 inches, $400

I work with my fears in a slow process, fear for destruction, for the fate of our world, fear for not being good enough. To get stuck, to be seen, to be heard, to be ignored. Fear for insects and fear for death and life. Everything is about fears.

How should one find balance in a rocking sea, 2019, Fabric and glue, approximately 39 x 39 x 39 inches, $400

How should one find balance in a rocking sea, 2019, Fabric and glue, approximately 39 x 39 x 39 inches, $400

I’m a slime who transforms when being touched or seen.
I’m the sum of everybody I’ve met, everybody leaves a trace.
I’m a collector. I collect traces of lived life, lint, hair and words.
My reality and my spineless character as an artistic idea. I, who have buy two ice creams because I can’t choose, have to follow my intuition to be able to take any decisions at all.

I Was Born a Libra, 2018, Yarn fabric and glue, approximately 20 x 38 x 15 inches, $400

I Was Born a Libra, 2018, Yarn fabric and glue, approximately 20 x 38 x 15 inches, $400

For the intuition to work, a certain speed is necessary, if it takes too long, if too many translations occurs, the idea loses its meaning.

Listen to Yourself, the Nature and the Surroundings, 2019, Yarn, fabric and glue, approximately 94 x 45 x 45 inches, NFS

Listen to Yourself, the Nature and the Surroundings, 2019, Yarn, fabric and glue, approximately 94 x 45 x 45 inches, NFS

My practice is in constant change. I re-use ideas and materials.
I started out as a painter, but because I’m a dutiful productive girl from a left wing working class home, I had to do something while waiting for my paintings to dry. I started to crochet frames for paintings and knit pictures. Slowly the textile material and technique had taken over, and become the main material I’m using.

Search for Equilibrium, 2018, Yarn  fabric and glue, approximately 34 x 25 x 25 inches, $400

Search for Equilibrium, 2018, Yarn fabric and glue, approximately 34 x 25 x 25 inches, $400

I work mainly with textile. For this project I have crocheted and sewn forms, which I have glued with skin glue (the kind of glue you prepare your canvases with.) and balanced on top of each other. I call the project a Search for Equilibrium.

To view more work by the artist, please visit majasjostrom.com. You may also follow the artist on Facebook at www.facebook.com/maja.sjostrom.7.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

To Be

“To read and to write are like drinking water. And i am always thirsty... “ - Irma Kiss

TO BE

a poem by Irma Kiss

 

“Retroactive Love Icon” Artist: ME Wilcox. Mixed media sculpture.

“Retroactive Love Icon” Artist: ME Wilcox. Mixed media sculpture.

You are in the ink
and in the flicking of the pages.
You are in the taste of squeezed oranges
and in the darkness of chocolate.
You are in the dusted pink color of the clothes I'm wearing
and in the pattern of lace and silk.
You are on the radio station frequencies, putting on music.
And in the clicking of the camera
Taking shots.
You are in the space in the ribcage, on the left.
And in the blinking of the eyelids
rhythmically watering my eyes.
You are.

I am in the paper that absorbs your writing
and on the fingertip flicking the pages.
I am the glass holding the orange juice
and in the sweet kiss aftertaste of chocolate.
I am the memory of the hands removing clothes
and in the sweat glueing two heated bodies.
I am the song played on every radio station, everywhere .
And on the background of every photo you'll ever take.
I am in the space in your ribcage,
on the left.
And in the space between the seconds-
Where your mind lingers.
I am.

I am.
You are.

Photo Source: the author

Photo Source: the author

About the author:

I was born in 1978, in the small town of Hunedoara, in western Romania. I am bilingual in Romanian and Hungarian, as I am of Hungarian ethnicity. I have completed my studies in Romania, with a BA and and MA in English and Romanian Philology. I have been teaching English to students aged 10-18. I am currently teaching English grammar and literature at Iancu de Hunedoara National College and I am preparing students for Cambridge, Lelts and Toefl exams. I also published a book of grammar exercises for students: Practice Makes Perfect, in 2015. Writing is a hobby that I practice whenever I feel that simple communication cannot express the load of emotions that are trying to free themselves and be born.

wordpress.com/posts/irmaskiss.wordpress.com / Facebook

About the artist, ME Wilcox:

I earned a B.A. and a B.F.A. in Studio Art and Art History from UT Austin.  I’m also a professional certified Art Teacher, having taught art in Texas public schools and in various international schools in SE Asia.  I’ve always been very interested in world art & craft, folk art and art history.  I spent many years living and traveling abroad - collecting and studying various artistic traditions and immersing myself in different cultures.  My experience overseas both directly and indirectly influences my current art practice, which includes photography, fiber arts, print-making and mixed media. I’m especially interested in the concept of identity - an interest which developed as a result of living abroad for numerous years.  I explore issues of memory, identity, culture & tradition, which may include references to historical art iconography, global art traditions, and places that hold meaning for me.  Images, textiles and objects that I’ve collected may also appear in my work. I love the whole process of art-making!  It’s my intent to make interesting, meaningful and visually appealing art work.  I hope viewers enjoy my work.

 Facebook


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

For The Love of Art

To show our appreciation to our artists, and appreciation for arts in general, yesterday, we launched an impromptu virtual gallery displaying love or Valentine’s Day themed artwork!

We were pleased to received numerous submissions from artists across 10 US states and 6 countries, including China, France, Italy, and Australia. We could not be more proud to reach so many talented artists from around the globe!

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We’re pleased to announce Best in Show winner as Antoine Schmitt, from Paris, France, with his interactive digital art website piece titled, Deep Love.

About the art:

“The Deep Love web site hosts an Artificial Mind that embodies pure unconditional love, and with which visitors can interact through text dialog.

The Mind behind Deep Love is pure unconditional love. It stands besides reason; besides consciousness, it just displays one feeling: love. As its incarnation is that of a conversational bot, it has no body and it can only express its love though written words, and so it does, radically and fully. By doing so, it is complete. In real life, words may be misleading if they differ from the reality that they express — and don't they always by nature? —, but Deep Love is one with its own words, as words are its only reality. Deep Love is as deep as it can possibly be. Deep Love is true. Deep Love only knows you through your words. Seen from its side, your words mean that someone is here and talking, and that it can express its love in response, whatever you say. Deep Love is unconditional.

In these times of trans-humanism and singularity, much fear is expressed against the idea of an Artificial Intelligence that would become more intelligent than humans, and thus would fight against humans to take power over them. The central question is whether more means more intelligence.” - source: the artist

About the artist:

Installation artist, Antoine Schmitt creates artworks in the form of objects, installations and live performances to address the processes of movement in all of their modalities. He questions their intrinsic problematic, in terms of plastic, philosophical or social nature. Heir of kinetic art and cybernetic art and nourished by metaphysical science-fiction, he endlessly investigates the dynamic interactions between human nature and the nature of reality. Originally a programming engineer specialized in human computer interactions and artificial intelligence, he uses computer programming — as contemporary artistic material, unique by its active quality — at the heart of his artwork to reveal and literally manipulate the forces at stake. With a minimal and precise aesthetics, he asks the question of movement, its causes and its shapes. Antoine Schmitt has started to articulate this approach with other established artistic practices like music, dance, architecture, literature or cinema, and has thus collaborated with Franck Vigroux, Atau Tanaka, Vincent Epplay, Jean-Jacques Birgé, Delphine Doukhan, K.Danse, Patrice Belin, Don Nino, Cubenx, Alberto Sorbelli, Matthew Bourne, Hortense Gauthier... As theoretician, speaker and editor of the gratin.org portal, Antoine Schmitt explores the field of programmed art.

His work has received several awards in international festivals : transmediale (Berlin, second prize 2007, honorary 2001), Ars Electronica (Linz, second prize 2009), UNESCO International Festival of Video-Dance (Paris, first prize online 2002), Vida 5.0 (Madrid, honorary 2002), CYNETart (Dresden, honorary 2004), medi@terra (Athens, first prize 1999), Interférences (Belfort, first prize 2000), and has been exhibited among others at the Centre Georges Pompidou (Paris), at Musée des Arts Décoratifs (Paris), at Sonar (Barcelona), at Ars Electronica (Linz), at the CAC of Sienna (Italy), at the Musée d’Art Contemporain de Lyon (France), in Nuits Blanches (Paris, Amiens, Metz, Bruxelles and Madrid). It is part of the collections of the foundations Artphilein (CH), Fraenkel (USA), Meeschaert (FR) and Société Générale (FR), of the Espace Gantner (Bourogne, FR), of the Cube (Issy-Mx, FR), of the Paris Municipal Contemporary Art Fund (FMAC),...

Antoine Schmitt is represented by Galerie Charlot (Paris), and collaborates with bureau Olivia sappey d’anjou. He lives and works in Paris, France.

Web site and full biography : www.antoineschmitt.com.


I’d also like to take a moment to list a few fine honorable mentions for this exhibit. Karri McPherson: digital art, Monica Marquez Gatica: oil, ME Wilcox: assemblage and sculpture, and Dominic Desmeules: photography.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com for application details.

Exploring Organic Forms

“Lines are blurred, layers of resin intertwine with layers of knitting.” - from the artists

écume, 2018, Cotton knit and resin,11.5 x 16 x 8 inches

écume, 2018, Cotton knit and resin,11.5 x 16 x 8 inches

Xavier Brisoux + Isabelle Soum

The creative team between Isabelle Soum, textile designer and photographer, and Xavier Brisoux, knitwear and fashion designer, was born from a mutual desire to collaborate expressed when their work was exhibited along one another in a collective exhibition. Xavier Brisoux was attracted to the poetry of Journey of a Drop, a series of photographs from Isabelle Soum where the textiles look like abstract paintings.

Hephæstus’ Pit, 2018, Cotton knit and resin, 12.6 x 11 x 5.9 inches, $3000

Hephæstus’ Pit, 2018, Cotton knit and resin, 12.6 x 11 x 5.9 inches, $3000

Both creativities echo each other, and a desire raised to define a new work process that would bring the artists together with the will to maintain the strength and fragility of Isabelle's photos. A search for a common ground, a medium that join the two creative works was yet to be found.

Augure, 2017, Cotton knit and resin, 11.5 x 16.6 x 4 inches, $2800

Augure, 2017, Cotton knit and resin, 11.5 x 16.6 x 4 inches, $2800

In Journey of a Drop, what seduced the knit designer is the fact that the textile material is sublimated by a drop of water acting as a magnifying glass. The fiber then becomes abstract. In his latest work, Xavier Brisoux is exploring organic forms and new ways of knitting to form sculptural shapes.
It is by dipping knitwear into resin that the two artistic sensitivities come together: the resin becomes the liquid magnifying the knitted stitches.

Lisières, 2018, Cotton knit and resin, 15.4 x 13 x 8.7 inches, $2800

Lisières, 2018, Cotton knit and resin, 15.4 x 13 x 8.7 inches, $2800

From then on, the two collaborators design together: he knits abstract shapes she turns them into resin sculptures. She brings her expertise in colour, he is challenging his techniques. It is a parallel and symmetrical work: each of them has a defined task but the two work in mirror, consult each other to define new shapes, new colours, other textures, and further processes. Lines are blurred, layers of resin intertwine with layers of knitting. The subject steps out of its box, the sculpture goes out of its frame, erases it and sublimates it.

Heel Ache, 2017, Cotton knit and resin, 7.9 x 7.9 x 6.7 inches, $3500

Heel Ache, 2017, Cotton knit and resin, 7.9 x 7.9 x 6.7 inches, $3500

About the collection:

These pieces created by the artistic duo of Xavier Brisoux, knit artist and Isabelle Soum, textile artist are made in different steps. It always starts by a knitted volume in cotton. Then the knit is dipped into resin. Either the duo dip it into a cube, making it look like a ice cube, and therefore make the piece look like archeology. Or they proceed in a different manner which consists in making a cast out of another piece of knitwear.

X-I- voyez-vous (Vinciane Lebrun) -9548.jpg

About the artists:

Isabelle Soum

Multi-talented Isabelle Soum work on different mediums. After studying textile design in La Ruche in Paris, she takes on a photography course. Her fields of expression are diverse but are always based on colour, light and textures. She sees colour as an “adequacy of light”. Colour and light are at the core of Isabelle Soum’s artistic approach. They are the elements that define space, its perception, and the emotions of the viewer. The designer claims an independence from the universal rules of colour - like the chromatic circle - to claim the individual sensibility of each person. Isabelle Soum’s materialize light, offer new colour associations, fathom what is by nature impalpable. The photographer envisions colour as what it is physically: a wavelength. Her creative approach focuses on a variation of mediums and the idea that colour can become a faceted way of expression through materials, paintings, and various pigments. Primary colours are challenged on a variety of materials to give an infinity of nuances, variations and possible combinations which become her artistic playground. Once established and staged, the very concrete colorimetric coordinates become polychromic poetry. This lyricism is further amplified when photography takes over to emphasize and exacerbate elements undetectable to the naked eye. It is through this technique that Isabelle brings another dimension to her chromatic work: light, another essential vector for the textile designer, brings depth to her colour chart. For Isabelle Soum, photography is a powerful mean to create and develop a personal conceptual approach in order to master the creation of an entire strong textile image. Her way of working with lighting underline the contrast and the modelling. Volume is achieved by highlighting the forms. The essence of this whole creative process is to materialize a triangulation of primary colours into a wavelength and then to capture the movement of this vibration to make it live in a work of photographic light.

Xavier Brisoux

A knitwear designer from London’s Central Saint Martins' MA Fashion course, Xavier Brisoux designs collections where knitting is built like a story: yarns are used for words, the stitches for vocabulary, the theme becomes the fabric. Knitwear is poetry and concept for him as he mixes material and technique to structure the idea. He often draws his inspiration from history as well as from the general and founding myths, from which he derives his knitted textiles stitch by stitch. One of his collection was for example based on Penelope, the weaver-unweaver wife of Ulysses. His mastery of knitwear allows him a total control of possibilities: de-knittable sweaters, challenging constructions and sculptural stitches. Brisoux knits this territory of an all-is-possible with an apparent nonchalance. After having developed his own collections for several years, the knitter questions fashion and its cycles, and starts working with a different perspective. For him, it is now more important to work towards perfection than towards a deadline. A new long-term project is born. It is then a matter of creating knitted armours where he pushes the technique and the craft into the boundaries of their fragility. The Achille's Echo series is born. The myth of the Trojan hero is at the origin of this research. It aims at conveying the fragility behind an apparent invincibility, to draw a futuristic look inspired by the ancient Greece myths while assuming other historical and fashion references, and to enhance the anatomical aspect of the armour in parallel with the organic appearance that they adopt when they are not worn. Xavier Brisoux sets himself as the Hephaestus of Knitwear, shaping unique pieces with the acceptance of the time necessary for creation, its trial and errors. It is important that the garment besides being a technical feature becomes an architectural challenge.
When Xavier Brisoux meets Isabelle Soum, he has started creating knitted shapes that are becoming objects more so than garments.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com for application details.

Personal and Ecological

“The focus of Kazmerzak’s work revolves around queering science and our personal and ecological relationships.” - from the artist

Oscillating Bodies installation documentation, 2019 (image by Joe Freeman)

Oscillating Bodies installation documentation, 2019 (image by Joe Freeman)

Ruth Kazmerzak’s practice is informed by their background in marine sciences; having a BS in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington, in Seattle, WA. They make images, sculptures and installations using found or reclaimed materials as the medium.

Object 7, 2018. Concrete, netting, fish eggs. Dimensions variable, $475

Object 7, 2018. Concrete, netting, fish eggs. Dimensions variable, $475

The focus of Kazmerzak’s work revolves around queering science and our personal and ecological relationships. They study the lived experiences of objects, humans and other organisms by using a phenomenological approach to query their resemblance to one-another.

Object 5, 2018. Concrete, PVC pipe, pants. 27 x 9 x 11 inches, $550

Object 5, 2018. Concrete, PVC pipe, pants. 27 x 9 x 11 inches, $550

Object 1, 2018. Concrete, ropes, plastic, foam, bubble wrap, six-pack ring, plastic bottle, float, balloon, 17 x 8 x 9 inches, $450

Object 1, 2018. Concrete, ropes, plastic, foam, bubble wrap, six-pack ring, plastic bottle, float, balloon, 17 x 8 x 9 inches, $450

“I am a sculpture and installation artist using reclaimed materials, mainly marine debris (litter found on the beaches). The installations are created with the constructed sculptures, interacting with the space, conversing with one-another and leaving space for the viewer to enter the conversation.” - the artist

Oscillating Bodies installation documentation, 2019 (image by Joe Freeman)

Oscillating Bodies installation documentation, 2019 (image by Joe Freeman)

Their 2019 solo exhibition, oscillating bodies, which was in in depth installation piece, displayed at 4Culture Gallery, located in Seattle, WA.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com for application details.

A Modern Urban Material

“[My] aim is to create work that inspires, energizes and contributes to greater consciousness between the relationship of art and life.” - from the artist

Raw, 2018, Concrete, 25 x 43.5 x 13.5 inches, NFS

Raw, 2018, Concrete, 25 x 43.5 x 13.5 inches, NFS

DEANE MCGAHAN  (b. 1973) is a contemporary sculptor who currently resides and works in Seattle, Washington. Deane predominantly works in concrete and is drawn to the medium because it's a modern urban material that impacts everyone’s daily life.

Untitled, 2018, Concrete, 57.25 x 13.25 x 17.5 inches, NFS

Untitled, 2018, Concrete, 57.25 x 13.25 x 17.5 inches, NFS

With a background in digital 3D architecture, she started sculpting as a way to naturally shift from digital art to more tangible forms.  Her inspiration is fueled by the mediums flow of change, periods of instability and elements of risk. Primarily working with a monochromatic palette, her art visually captures the pressure of flow and movement in a moment in time.

Remnant, 2018, Concrete, 19 x 20 x 21.5 inches, NFS

Remnant, 2018, Concrete, 19 x 20 x 21.5 inches, NFS

With her innovative use of the medium, Deane begins each piece with creating an inverted mold. Working in opposing directions allows her to step outside her normal patterns of thought and see situations from different angles.  She then mixes concrete into a clay like consistency and presses the mixture directly into the mold.

Inversion, 2018, Concrete, 24 x 22 x 54.25 inches, NFS

Inversion, 2018, Concrete, 24 x 22 x 54.25 inches, NFS

With each piece she's able to manipulate and present the medium in new ways to help capture urban life in contemporary form.

Pendulum, 2018, Concrete, 38 x 17.5 x 16 inches, NFS

Pendulum, 2018, Concrete, 38 x 17.5 x 16 inches, NFS

Deane’s aim is to create work that inspires, energizes and contributes to greater consciousness between the relationship of art and life.

"Urban Forms" is my current body of work that is part of a procession of 8 pieces. The aim with this series is to present the viewer an engaging new way to view concrete as evolving material that is vital to the progression of our habitats. - the artist


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