textile / fiber art

Between Soft and Rigid

“…found objects not only lose their original function but also can not be clearly defined anymore.” - the artist

Bergmann, 2019, garments, braided hose, earrings, thread, 41 x 21 x 9 in, 2300$

Bergmann, 2019, garments, braided hose, earrings, thread, 41 x 21 x 9 in, 2300$

Initially coming from painting, Anna-Lena Sauer’s latest work increasingly focuses on the exploration of different kinds of material, ranging from natural and synthetic textiles to plastics and paint.

Remix 4, 2019, bunting bag, nylon and thread, 10 x 11 x 11 in, 950$

Remix 4, 2019, bunting bag, nylon and thread, 10 x 11 x 11 in, 950$

In her abstract material paintings and sculptures the artist re-utilizes every-day objects such as garments, fabric scraps, broken soccer balls, garden hoses and packaging materials.

Wall Pillow 1, 2018, nylon, fabric scraps and acrylic paint on canvas, 12 x 12 x 2.5 in, 850$

Wall Pillow 1, 2018, nylon, fabric scraps and acrylic paint on canvas, 12 x 12 x 2.5 in, 850$

Liberated from their familiar context and included in a work of art, the found objects not only lose their original function but also can not be clearly defined anymore. Sauer uses them as an artistic medium, a substitute for paint or clay to give texture and plasticity to her work.

Remix 6, 2019, faux fur and found object, 7 x 5 inches, 900$

Remix 6, 2019, faux fur and found object, 7 x 5 inches, 900$

Of particular interest is the juxtaposition of contrasting materials and their different properties as well as the interaction of texture, color, line, shape and space as autonomous key elements. The experimentation with material reveals ongoing tensions between softness and rigidity, disclosure and concealment, tenseness and release.

Peccadillo, 2019, faux fur, fabric scraps and nylon on stretcher bars, 13 x 12.5 x 6 in, 850$

Peccadillo, 2019, faux fur, fabric scraps and nylon on stretcher bars, 13 x 12.5 x 6 in, 850$

Sauer intends to activate seeing. The perception of her work is an engaging process challenging the observer’s attention and patience in times of rapid media consumption.

Wall Sculpture 23, 2019, fabric scraps, nylon, zipper and garments on canvas, 12 x 12 x 3.5 in, 850$

Wall Sculpture 23, 2019, fabric scraps, nylon, zipper and garments on canvas, 12 x 12 x 3.5 in, 850$

Anna-Lena Sauer profile pic.jpg

About the artist:

In my abstract material art, I am re-utilizing broken or outworn garments and textiles. I use them as an artistic medium, a substitute for paint or clay to give texture and plasticity to my work.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.annalenasauerartist.com. You nay also follow the artist on Facebook at de-de.facebook.com/AnnaLenaSauerArtist, as well as Instagram @annalenasauerartist.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

What’s Going On Upstairs

“The [work] had given people permission to open up about how they felt about their bodies…” - the artist

Room for Improvement (detail), 2018, toy bed, cotton, silk threads, 7 cm x 4.5 cm x 4 cm. NFS

Room for Improvement (detail), 2018, toy bed, cotton, silk threads, 7 cm x 4.5 cm x 4 cm. NFS

Q: What led you to become a fiber / textile artist?

A: I worked as a crafts person for fifteen years designing and hand stitching miniature dolls house samplers for adult collectors. It was a successful business and I had an American agent who sold my work all over the USA, in Japan and Europe. I traded my work in the UK. It was a lovely time and fitted in very well with my life as a mother of two young daughters. I traveled to Chicago and New York at the invitation of my agent to attend prestigious dolls house exhibitions. As my daughters began to grow up I felt the need to learn new things and attended a college to obtain a City & Guilds certificate in Creative Embroidery. Whilst there, a tutor encouraged me to apply for a university degree course in the Applied Arts. It was a wonderful experience which opened my mind to new ideas, and I had a chance to explore different media, but I always returned to textiles/fiber. In 2007 I completed my degree, released the ties from my business to become a qualified artist specializing in textiles. I had always wanted to be an artist from a young age so it was wonderful to finally fulfill my dream.

Under Pressure, 2018, cotton, silk threads, 34 cm x 10 cm. NFS

Under Pressure, 2018, cotton, silk threads, 34 cm x 10 cm. NFS

Q: What inspired the collection you submitted?

A: From 2010 I had been creating works about women and dieting and in 2014 exhibited all of the pieces as part of a full-size kitchen art installation. It was a major task as I had to draw up a plan as if I was designing a real kitchen with cupboards, a washing machine, dishwasher, refrigerator, etc. A carpenter made all of the units and I covered them with silkscreen printed fabric, embellished with hand stitching. There was a kitchen table and when the visitors came to view the work they surprised me by sitting down at the table, which was set out as an art piece, and proceeded to talk about their lives. The installation had given people permission to open up about how they felt about their bodies, about failed diets and about family members who had suffered with eating disorders. A short time after the exhibition closed a young woman contacted me to let me know that she had seen the kitchen. She told me that she had had anorexia nervosa from the age of 11. She said that seeing the work had made her want to get better. We kept in contact and I wanted to tell her story. She very bravely offered me her diaries about her illness and this was the starting point of my research into eating disorders.

You See Food, I See Numbers, 2016, medicine capsules, cotton, silk threads, 15 cm x 24 cm. NFS

You See Food, I See Numbers, 2016, medicine capsules, cotton, silk threads, 15 cm x 24 cm. NFS

Q: Can you describe the materials you used and your creative process?

A: The main material that I use is cotton, and I use fine silk threads to hand sew text and motifs. There is usually an addition of other ready made materials, such as key-rings, dolls house furniture, and even weighing scales, which are adapted to emphasize my concept.

My creative process always begins with an inspiring idea. It is the springboard to opening up a fresh sketchbook in which to record my thoughts. Research is the most important part of my work and I will order relevant books online. Reading is always inspiring and will expand any ideas that I already have. I attend conferences and talks, as well as visiting museums and art galleries. Now that social media is so accessible, I utilize it to find out people’s views. I have also been contacted by individuals who have a story to tell. I like to include the lived experiences and thoughts of others to create an authentic artwork.

Life Line, 2018, cotton, silk threads, 175 cm x 52 cm. NFS

Life Line, 2018, cotton, silk threads, 175 cm x 52 cm. NFS

Q: We were impressed with your Best in Show piece, titled Life Line, as well as the rest of this themed collection. Tell us more about this piece/series.

A: Thank you. ‘Life Line’ was created to be displayed inside a bedroom art installation titled ‘What’s Going On Upstairs’ (2018). I created the drip bag using a pattern from a medical IV bag. The piece hung from a drip stand and the attached tube ran from the bag to a handmade quilt which lay on a bed. It became a metaphor for the recovery of a patient with an eating disorder. All of the hand stitched text on the drip bag came from a teenager’s account of her illness, and in particular her struggle with an ‘anorexia fairy’ who sat on her shoulder. She was mentally controlled by it, and would follow its instructions on what not to eat and how much exercise she should do. When the artwork went on display, the first person to read the words on ‘Life Line’ was crying uncontrollably. She said that she had recognized herself in that piece.

‘What’s Going On Upstairs’ was created to be half way between an adolescent’s bedroom and a hospital room. It dealt with scale, as a person with an eating disorder will often think that their body is much bigger than it actually is. There was a dolls house titled ‘The Secret Life of an Eating Disorder’ which was displayed on a chest-of-drawers. It appeared really innocent until the viewer looked at the detail. Each room related to something about eating disorders, and the bedroom in particular, was laid out in a similar way to the full-size installation. There were miniature objects such as pink slippers, a blood pressure cuff, weighing scales, even a tiny stethoscope in the dolls house, and these were replicated as full size in the room. It gave a feeling of unreality, and begged the question: ‘Am I standing inside the dolls house or am I in the installation?’

Identity Crisis, 2017, cotton, silk threads, plastic catch, 6 cm x 2 cm. NFS

Identity Crisis, 2017, cotton, silk threads, plastic catch, 6 cm x 2 cm. NFS

Q: What do you hope for viewers to take away from your work?

A: When I make an artwork I do not think about what the viewers will take away from it. I am thinking about how I am going to construct the piece, how it is going to be displayed and most importantly, does it work successfully? Because of this, it is always a great revelation how the work is interpreted by the public. When ‘What’s Going On Upstairs’ was exhibited I was overwhelmed by the reaction to it. The room became a safe place for people to express their emotions. There were many tears (I shed some myself), many hugs, and many accounts relating to eating disorders. Viewers talked about problems that they were having with their own illness, or those of their family members, or friends. People really connected to the work and it was a hugely emotional show, especially so because the exhibition took place in a knitting and stitching show and not in a healthcare environment.

Do My Bones Look Big In This, 2018, puppet, cotton, silk threads, 36 cm x 12 cm. NFS

Do My Bones Look Big In This, 2018, puppet, cotton, silk threads, 36 cm x 12 cm. NFS

Q: How do you view your art career in five years?

A: I am constantly questioning my art career as I do not want it to become static. I want it to be continuously moving forwards. I would like to work more with institutions, collaborating with academics in other fields. Within five years it would be great to be combining my own research with those from universities and from health organisations to create more insightful artworks.

Photo source: the artist

Photo source: the artist

About the artist:

Caren Garfen specializes in textiles and painstaking hand stitching creating carefully considered pieces with profound messages.

Caren's interest is in gender politics and women’s issues in the twenty-first century. She works around specific themes, such as women and work/life balance or women and dieting/the body. Her wryly humorous and sharply observed hand sewn messages are the result of extensive research and intuitive observation. Inspiration is derived from social media, fiction and non-fiction literature and from personal stories.

Caren has established an international reputation for her accessible yet challenging issue-based art. Her work has been exhibited widely in the UK and Europe, as well as in Japan, USA, and Canada.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Threaded: a fiber & textiles collection

ENVISION ARTS VIRTUAL GALLERY, THREADED IS NOW ON DISPLAY

FROM MAY 1ST - MAY 31ST.

We were pleased to have received over 100 submissions from talented artists across 17 US states and 15 countries, including France, Norway, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, Brazil, Italy, Spain, Ireland and Canada. We could not be more excited to reach so many amazing artists from around the globe!

We are pleased to announce Best in Show winner as Caren Garfen, from London, United Kingdom, for her piece titled Life Line, 2019.

Life Line, 2018, cotton, silk threads, 175 cm x 52 cm. NFS

Life Line, 2018, cotton, silk threads, 175 cm x 52 cm. NFS

About the artist:

Caren Garfen specialises in textiles and painstaking hand stitching creating carefully considered pieces with profound messages.

Caren's interest is in gender politics and women’s issues in the twenty-first century. She works around specific themes, such as women and work/life balance or women and dieting/the body. Her wryly humorous and sharply observed hand sewn messages are the result of extensive research and intuitive observation. Inspiration is derived from social media, fiction and non-fiction literature and from personal stories.

Caren has established an international reputation for her accessible yet challenging issue-based art. Her work has been exhibited widely in the UK and Europe, as well as in Japan, USA, and Canada.


I’d like to take a moment to list our honorable mentions for this exhibit:

Deb Step, from Massachusetts, United States; Hannah Surace, from Georgia, United States; Francisca Henneman, from Zuid-Holland, The Netherlands; and Anna-Lena Sauer, from California, United States.

Special thank you to all artists who applied for this collective. The jury process was extremely difficult as we had so many beautiful and unique works submitted. Congratulations to all!

TO view our current calls for artists, please visit HERE.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Pillow Talk

“Clothes as memory, memory as paper, Paper as human, human as a book.” - the artist

Pillowtalk, 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

Pillowtalk, 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

Pillowtalk is a book that contains the moments and thoughts of my relationships as a homosexual male who grows up in traditional Chinese culture. There was no chance for me to express my thoughts of relationship but during the night. The longing and missing love have inspired me to create this work.

Pillowtalk (detail 1), 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

Pillowtalk (detail 1), 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

This book is bound in chain stitch of handmade paper with found texts with individual sheets of papers records the unspoken words. This pink paper was handmade out of linear cotton fiber and filling cotton for the pillows, and I stamped an invisible “I love you” mark.

Pillowtalk (detail 2), 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

Pillowtalk (detail 2), 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

The pillow is the listener of my desires of love and the witness of my relationships. The purple papers were made of my boyfriends’ clothes, and I stamped my ex-boyfriends' name in faded silver and have my current boyfriend’s name in bold gold.

Pillowtalk (detail 3), 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

Pillowtalk (detail 3), 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

The cloth is second skin we have, it holds the memory that we remember and contains the moments that intrigue us. By making the clothes into papers, the memories have been stored in a book.

Pillowtalk (detail 4), 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

Pillowtalk (detail 4), 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

I am a contemporary bookbinder who works with multimedia book arts. Reconstructing the fibers into a sheet of paper, reconstructing the container of the memories.

Pillowtalk (detail 5), 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

Pillowtalk (detail 5), 2018, Book Art, 13 in x 9 in x 3 in, $500

To view more work by the artist, please visit zhefuwan.com. You may also follow the artist on Facebook at www.facebook.com/zhefuwan, as well as Instagram @jacobzwan.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Searching for Spaces

“I am searching for spaces or things that lost our attention, that might seem to be banal, boring, or disintegrating as a place, and I put my focus of attention on them through the work.” - the artist

Crackling Surface, 2018, embroidered organza, 30 x 210 cm, 300 euro

Crackling Surface, 2018, embroidered organza, 30 x 210 cm, 300 euro

Since presence in physical space is what helps me to express myself the easiest, I expect people will also interact through their bodies, moving and relating with the created space.

The main idea of my body of work is related to my Buddhist practice. It is the first noble truth from the Buddhist philosophy: There is suffering.  The main instrument for grasping it is the reflection and insight into impermanence. That is, we suffer as a consequence of our resistance to change, because we want the world to remain as it is, and it does not - for good or for bad. Does it mean we are fragile or too powerful in front of it?

Lack of Politics, 2018, embroidered organza, 30 x 210 cm, 300 euro

Lack of Politics, 2018, embroidered organza, 30 x 210 cm, 300 euro

I am searching for spaces or things that lost our attention, that might seem to be banal, boring, or disintegrating as a place, and I put my focus of attention on them through the work. The work is usually a site –specific work or an intervention in space.

I am usually underlining disintegrating elements, coloring or adding precious details that create focus on the vital potential of the place. For me to do the work is struggling to live into a breathing space, while letting go of both the loses of the past as well as of the achievements of the past, and striving to gain more insight while accepting things as they come and go through our lives.

Anger, 2016, digital print, 90 x 90 cm, 300 euro

Anger, 2016, digital print, 90 x 90 cm, 300 euro

The main idea of the changing nature of things is one we can easily grasp intellectually - for some might sound even as a truism - yet our emotional experience rarely integrates this truth. This is the reason I intend to raise attention not only to the idea of an impermanent reality but also to the suffering brought by change. Nevertheless, the work aims to be a proposal of contemplating the precious nature of all of our moments as long as we are alive, being a possible open door towards our joy of living.

It is also due to the interdependence of things that intervention into a vulnerable or painful point of place is a sort of urban acupuncture – that radiates ripples around it, integrating change processes into the work.   The viewer of the work should be inspired to be present in space.

Surgery, 2018, embroidery on organza, 30 x 210 cm, 300 euro

Surgery, 2018, embroidery on organza, 30 x 210 cm, 300 euro

" Impermanence means change moment by moment."
( Geshe Tashi Tsering, 2008, 26)    

The image is connected with the text: the digital image created without the use of a camera, taking the form of  printed photograms together with embroidered texts.  Which one has the stronger visual burden? The project is balancing between "nothing special' and "a peculiar tiny drop ".

Some people need a mountain to be happy, while others just a stone; some need the whole sea, where others just a spoon full of water. The self-censorship but also the question 'maybe this.... is enough for me ? 'is the core and kernel of this work.  It starts from a spoon of pepper, a handful of popcorn, a strand of hair ,  some beads of semi -precious stones and a couple of spoons of wheat milk . It has an autobiographic charge, but it is not in the direction of making use of one or another personal story, yet in the sense of asking a question towards another human being, towards the viewer.

Regret, 2016, digital print , 90 x 90 cm, 300 euro

Regret, 2016, digital print , 90 x 90 cm, 300 euro

The particular matter is associated with a certain negative emotion: irritation, anger, regret, self- grasping, but also compassion as a returning towards the self. It is maybe one way of saying that you can survive even with negative emotions as long as you can transform them in compassion turned at least towards yourself.

Scanning matter made necessary the full, focused attention, one which I imagined as a reiteration of Fox Talbot's gestures while he was preparing his first photogenic drawings, included in The Pencil of Nature. Also it implies the practice of mindfulness, which, even if not seen in the outcome, it has been required for the process to take place.

Resilience, 2018, embroidery on organza, 300 euro

Resilience, 2018, embroidery on organza, 300 euro

I was not interested in the formal aspects the images will take, but I considered the form or, better said their formlessness as a consequence of the process.

Just the decisions of presenting them large as a landscape format ( 90x90cm prints) has been seen in a dialogue of the old tradition of Pictorialism, particularly Anne Brigman. This decision opened it up towards embroidery as a minor art, where the process of the craft, the details, are absolutely necessary for creating a work. It aims towards a change of attitude, a change of priorities.

As a consequence the inclusion of the embroidered text that seem to have a personal value derived from the images - though sometimes refer to personal experience, sometimes just to imagined one- is seen as a reclaiming of balance between self and other.

It is not asking a rhetorical question, but an attempt of a dialogue based on intuition and understanding between myself and the reality of which the self is part and parcel, a reality it also constructs.

To view more work by the artist, please visit mirelaivanciu.weebly.com. You may also follow the artist on Instagram @mirelai_1.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Actual Depth

“I am interested in fooling the eye employing both, trompe l’ioels and actual depth.” - the artist

Different Perspectives I, 2016. Fibers, NFS

Different Perspectives I, 2016. Fibers, NFS

I never thought about turning 65, and all that would entail. As years of welding, grinding, the heavy lifting of sculpture, and shoulder surgeries gradually caught up with me; I began to think of other materials, materials that would extend my art-making another 25-30 years.

Tromper l'oeil, tromper l'esprit I, 2018. Fiber, $3500

Tromper l'oeil, tromper l'esprit I, 2018. Fiber, $3500

Long ago I was a kite maker, I created them using traditional quilt patterns, sewing them out of rip-stop nylon; flying, and exhibiting them all over the world. Therefore, I had spent an inordinate amount of time on a sewing machine.

Tromper l'oeil, tromper l'esprit III, 2018. Fiber, $5000

Tromper l'oeil, tromper l'esprit III, 2018. Fiber, $5000

Fabric seemed a logical material to return to. Transitioning from welder to fabric artist I have become conscious of how often I still think about how light falls across a plane, I have used gradation in other fabric pieces to create depth, but in this series, I am interested in fooling the eye employing both, trompe l’ioels and actual depth.  

Tromper l'oeil, tromper l'esprit II, 2018. Fibers, $3500

Tromper l'oeil, tromper l'esprit II, 2018. Fibers, $3500

Trained primarily as a sculptor I am always aware of how light falls across a surface.  This series traces my experimentation with Tread Painting, from creating the illusion of 3-D to creating pieces that are actually 3-D.

Bob's Block, The hard edge of thread, 2018. Fibers, $2500

Bob's Block, The hard edge of thread, 2018. Fibers, $2500

This work was made on 3 stationary Bernina sewing machines using (+or-) 56 miles of Gutermann thread; hours of pod cast, book tapes, and online courses, something impossible when welding and grinding steel. From ear plugs to ear buds, not a bad trade.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

When You Are a Woman

“She rewrites stories by stitching on them: poetry, wonders and subtleties are the key to her art works.” - from the artist

Ride, 2019, Embroidery on Photograph, 4.7 x 4.7 cm, NFS

Ride, 2019, Embroidery on Photograph, 4.7 x 4.7 cm, NFS

"Everything is Political" is an ongoing series of embroidered photographs with women being the protagonists of the pieces. Each one of them brings a feminist/reflexive message to the spectator.

Sisterhood, 2018, Embroidery on Photograph, 9.5 x 6.5 cm, NFS

Sisterhood, 2018, Embroidery on Photograph, 9.5 x 6.5 cm, NFS

Her work dives into forgotten memories through old photographs that were found in antique shops, flea markets and even in dusty family albums. She rewrites stories by stitching on them: poetry, wonders and subtleties are the key to her art works.

When you're a woman, 2018, Embroidery on Photograph, 7 x 13.5 cm, NFS

When you're a woman, 2018, Embroidery on Photograph, 7 x 13.5 cm, NFS

Women's stereotypes are constantly being  questioned. Her focus is to make them the protagonists of their own story.

Future, 2018, Embroidery on Photograph, 9.5 x 6.5 cm, NFS

Future, 2018, Embroidery on Photograph, 9.5 x 6.5 cm, NFS

Living in Brazil, a country where violence against women is present everyday has contributed to [Juliana Naufel’s] choice of defying and making reflections in her pieces. Being aware that everything is political when you are a woman is what keeps her going.

Her Story, 2019, Embroidery on Photograph, 11.5 x 7 cm, NFS

Her Story, 2019, Embroidery on Photograph, 11.5 x 7 cm, NFS

About the artist:

Juliana Naufel was born in 1996 in São Paulo, Brazil, where she currently runs her own studio to research about the connections between textile art, art & gender and Women Artists from Latin America.

Naufel is a Bachelor in Visual Arts by UNESP - São Paulo‘s State University and an emerging artist that was already featured in group shows at Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Portugal, Spain and U.S.A.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.cargocollective.com/juliananaufel, as well as www.facebook.com/naufssjuliana. You may also follow the artist on Instagram @naufss.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Craft and Fine Art

“Her inspiration comes from family and cultural traditions of domestic craft, and aims to bridge the gap between craft and fine art in her work.” - from the artist

Curling Hair with Fingers, 2019, Cotton thread, sequins, and glass beads on canvas, 5 x 5.5 x 0.5 inches, $120

Curling Hair with Fingers, 2019, Cotton thread, sequins, and glass beads on canvas, 5 x 5.5 x 0.5 inches, $120

Whitney Batres is a visual artist who currently resides in Austin, Texas with her husband and their cat, Karen. In 2015, she graduated with a BFA in Studio Art from the University of Texas at Austin and stuck around for the people and the food.

Listening to Marlon Williams, 2019, Cotton thread, gouache, and glass beads on canvas, 4 x 4.5 x 0.5 inches, $100

Listening to Marlon Williams, 2019, Cotton thread, gouache, and glass beads on canvas, 4 x 4.5 x 0.5 inches, $100

She has exhibited in the East Austin Studio Tour, Flatbed Press and Gallery, Co-Lab Projects, and Print Austin.

Reciting Grocery Lists, 2019, Cotton thread, gouache, and glass beads on canvas, 7 x 7.5 x 0.5 inches, $150

Reciting Grocery Lists, 2019, Cotton thread, gouache, and glass beads on canvas, 7 x 7.5 x 0.5 inches, $150

Her inspiration comes from family and cultural traditions of domestic craft, and aims to bridge the gap between craft and fine art in her work.

To view more work by the artist, please visit whitneybatres.com. You may also follow the artist on Instagram @whitbat.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

My Handbag

My Handbag

a poem by Shurouk Hammoud

 

Everyday (2018)  Artist: Clara Quintela . Embroidery, 4 m x 3 m - Exhibition at Popup Gallery

Everyday (2018) Artist: Clara Quintela. Embroidery, 4 m x 3 m - Exhibition at Popup Gallery

My handbag is full of caution

Buttons of all sizes

For sudden holes

Needle and black threads

To sew wounds of heart and clothing as well

Empty sanitary bags for vomiting cases that occur to those who live here nowadays

Wet wipes to wipe make up' shredders.

My handbag is full of futility

Polisher for my shoes those expired by long roads

A mobile phone that is full of people 'names I cannot any longer remember

My poor quality glasses

My optometrist prescribed

On the pretext that I do not see beyond my nose

Dry cigarettes and a lighter that staggers genetically

Dried flowers and poems whose papers did not accommodate

Hankies those got tired of farewells

And you ask me why does my back hurt?

Photo source: the author

Photo source: the author

About the author:

 Shurouk Hammod "born in 1982 ", a Syrian poetess, literary translator, BA of arts graduate and a master degree graduate of text translation, Damascus University. She has three published poetry collections in Arabic language and two published poetry collection in English titled: (the night papers),(Blind time), in addition; excerpts of her poetry that have been published in many poetry anthologies in France, Serbia, Netherlands and India. She is a member of Palestinian writers and journalists union and honorary member at NAJI Naaman international library of honorary culture. She is an award winner of many local and international poetry awards, to include: Charles Baudelaire first prize for poetry creativity, 2018; Sylvia Plath medal for writing poetry 2017; Jack Kerouac poetry merit award 2016; Arthur Rimbaud merit diploma for writing poetry, 2015; Nazik al Malieka literary prize for writing poetry 2012; Alexandria public library prize for writing poetry 2012; and Naji Namman international literary prize for writing poetry 2014. She has been appointed as ambassador of the word by the Spanish Foundation Cesar Egido Serrano, in 2016. Her poetry has been translated into French, Finnish, Spanish, Bengali, Mandarin, German, Romanian, Italian and English. Email: shurouk.hammoud82@gmail.com


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Landscape and Nature

“My work often transcends between abstract and figurative. Forms and figures take shape intentionally or by accident.” - the artist

Budapest No. 2, 2017, Acrylic and textile, 20 x 26 inches, $1600

Budapest No. 2, 2017, Acrylic and textile, 20 x 26 inches, $1600

My work in general reflects a strong and powerful relationship to landscape and nature, this includes city-specific landscapes. I am a nomadic artist, I let the country or the town where I set my studio affect my work. The environment and surrounding of this new area, have considerable influence and impact on my production. I let the lieu become my muse.

Brazil No. 1, 2018, handmade paper and textile, 17 x 11 inches, $800

Brazil No. 1, 2018, handmade paper and textile, 17 x 11 inches, $800

I am a multidisciplinary artist, although I have used painting and photography in the last years quite extensively. Textile art is also a media I cherish. My work often transcends between abstract and figurative. Forms and figures take shape intentionally or by accident. However, I find that a less literal and more abstract approach to composition produce paintings or works of art more intensely imaginative. It keeps me further away from esthetical and intellectual decisions.

Budapest No. 1, 2017, Acrylic and textile, 18 x 19 inches, $900

Budapest No. 1, 2017, Acrylic and textile, 18 x 19 inches, $900

With my camera, I collected and collated the textures, colours, shapes and qualities of sceneries in the different artistic residencies I attended and translated what I learned from these different places into materials and making.

Brazil No. 2, 2018, acrylic and textile, 20 x 16 inches, $900

Brazil No. 2, 2018, acrylic and textile, 20 x 16 inches, $900

In this collection, you will find visual research of Budapest’s architecture and Brazil’s Atlantica Forest. Each piece evolves through a process of fragmentation and reconstruction. Patching and layering of fabrics forms a background for stitch; this style of work reflects my interest in collage. I am inspired by the potential of overlaps, intersections and anomalies.

Brazil No. 3, 2018, acrylic and textile, 25 x 16 inches, $1600

Brazil No. 3, 2018, acrylic and textile, 25 x 16 inches, $1600

About the artist:

Anne-Julie Hynes resides in Quebec, Canada. She has a Certificate in Landscape Architecture, from the Université de Montréal, Canada, as well as a BFA in Fine Arts, from Concordia University, in Montreal, Canada. She has participated in numerous arts residencies and exhibitions throughout Canada and in Europe.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.annejuliehynes.com.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Resistance

“…we must not normalize our current political situation.” - the artist

The First Flag of Resistance, 2017. Hand embroidery on re-purposed pillowcase, 30 x 19.5 inches. NFS

The First Flag of Resistance, 2017. Hand embroidery on re-purposed pillowcase, 30 x 19.5 inches. NFS

I am a fiber artist working in several areas: temari (embroidered thread balls, a traditional Japanese art); knitting (original designs, wearable art); and embroidery. These three works (one full photo and one detail photo each), using stitched text and simple imagery, are part of a larger collection of resistance artwork I have been making since Inauguration Day 2017.

The First Flag of Resistance, 2017 (detail)

The First Flag of Resistance, 2017 (detail)

This larger body of work comprises the three pieces submitted here plus 100 smaller pieces that have been assembled into two large Cloths of Resistance, plus two more (at this point) Flags of Resistance. A recurring element in many of these works is the phrase "THIS IS NOT NORMAL," which I stitch every day.

Hands Off, 2018. Hand embroidery on antique table linen, 29 x 22.5 inches. $500

Hands Off, 2018. Hand embroidery on antique table linen, 29 x 22.5 inches. $500

This is not to suggest that there is some magical "normal" from which we have deviated and to which we should return, but rather to remind myself on a daily basis that we must not normalize our current political situation.

Hands Off, 2018. (detail)

Hands Off, 2018. (detail)

About the artist:

India Tresselt is a fiber artist from the Champlain Valley in northwestern Vermont. She explores color, pattern, shape, and texture in three different forms: temari (embroidered thread balls, an ancient Japanese art), embroidery, and handknitting. These techniques are all linked by the use of yarn or thread and the slow, detailed, and meditative process of handstitch.

A serious knitter for many years, she has worked in a yarn shop, taught knitting and temari making, and designed patterns for handknits. More recently, she has returned to a childhood pastime—embroidery—to create work that is both personal and political, employing stitched text and simple imagery to comment and reflect on issues affecting our country and our world.

She is a member of Vermont Hand Crafters, Inc., and serves on the Board of Directors of that organization; the Vermont Crafts Council; the Surface Design Association; TAFA: The Textile and Fiber Arts List; and Artizan Made. Her work may be found in Vermont at Grand Isle Artworks, as well as online on her website, Etsy, Facebook, Instagram, and the Made on Monday website. She has exhibited her work at several venues in Vermont, including the Hartness Library at Vermont Technical College and Fletcher Free Library in Burlington, and her resistance artwork has been featured many times in The Nation magazine’s OppArt blog.

To view more work by the artist, please visit www.yarndancevt.com. You may also follow the artist on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Yarndance, as well as Instagram @yarndance.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

Search for Equilibrium

“The process of making and the process of thinking. Repetition as a way to transform.” - the artist

A Point of Balance, 2019, Yarn fabric and glue, approximately 51 x 15 x 15 inches, $400

A Point of Balance, 2019, Yarn fabric and glue, approximately 51 x 15 x 15 inches, $400

It’s all about the process. The process of making and the process of thinking.
Repetition as a way to transform.

I sit for hours crocheting, as a private protest against a stressful society,
or as a meaningless time-killer while waiting for change. A feeling of impuissance.

Will people wake up before it’s too late?

Balance in Between, 2019, Yarn and glue, approximately 61 x 35 x 35 inches, $400

Balance in Between, 2019, Yarn and glue, approximately 61 x 35 x 35 inches, $400

I work with my fears in a slow process, fear for destruction, for the fate of our world, fear for not being good enough. To get stuck, to be seen, to be heard, to be ignored. Fear for insects and fear for death and life. Everything is about fears.

How should one find balance in a rocking sea, 2019, Fabric and glue, approximately 39 x 39 x 39 inches, $400

How should one find balance in a rocking sea, 2019, Fabric and glue, approximately 39 x 39 x 39 inches, $400

I’m a slime who transforms when being touched or seen.
I’m the sum of everybody I’ve met, everybody leaves a trace.
I’m a collector. I collect traces of lived life, lint, hair and words.
My reality and my spineless character as an artistic idea. I, who have buy two ice creams because I can’t choose, have to follow my intuition to be able to take any decisions at all.

I Was Born a Libra, 2018, Yarn fabric and glue, approximately 20 x 38 x 15 inches, $400

I Was Born a Libra, 2018, Yarn fabric and glue, approximately 20 x 38 x 15 inches, $400

For the intuition to work, a certain speed is necessary, if it takes too long, if too many translations occurs, the idea loses its meaning.

Listen to Yourself, the Nature and the Surroundings, 2019, Yarn, fabric and glue, approximately 94 x 45 x 45 inches, NFS

Listen to Yourself, the Nature and the Surroundings, 2019, Yarn, fabric and glue, approximately 94 x 45 x 45 inches, NFS

My practice is in constant change. I re-use ideas and materials.
I started out as a painter, but because I’m a dutiful productive girl from a left wing working class home, I had to do something while waiting for my paintings to dry. I started to crochet frames for paintings and knit pictures. Slowly the textile material and technique had taken over, and become the main material I’m using.

Search for Equilibrium, 2018, Yarn  fabric and glue, approximately 34 x 25 x 25 inches, $400

Search for Equilibrium, 2018, Yarn fabric and glue, approximately 34 x 25 x 25 inches, $400

I work mainly with textile. For this project I have crocheted and sewn forms, which I have glued with skin glue (the kind of glue you prepare your canvases with.) and balanced on top of each other. I call the project a Search for Equilibrium.

To view more work by the artist, please visit majasjostrom.com. You may also follow the artist on Facebook at www.facebook.com/maja.sjostrom.7.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.

A Sort of Singularity

“To quote Jane McKeating, ‘Color drips off the needle every bit as richly as that from a brush’.” - the artist

Duality I, 2018, 18 h x 12 w, $330

Duality I, 2018, 18 h x 12 w, $330

I am a multidisciplinary artist, with a 50 year career,  who combines a mixed media practice with embroidery across digital and manual platforms. Everything in our culture tends toward hurry.  This work is about slowing down.

At the heart of the current process is digital embroidery, designing in the computer and stitching out on a computer-aided machine. This is not new. It has been used in the fashion industry and the promotions markets for many years. Digital machine embroidery is not a substitute for, nor a speedier version of, nor an imitator of handwork. It is a mindset and a media choice in and of itself.

Semaphore, 2019, 51" h x 57" w x 3" d, $1200

Semaphore, 2019, 51" h x 57" w x 3" d, $1200

A single stitch is made by stretching a thread between two holes. The line formed by it can be loose or tight. It can be thick or thin, depending on the diameter of the thread. It can be long or so short that it barely exists. But, it can never exist as more than a single defined geometric event, a sort of singularity. The combinations of these singularities create planes, lines, forms, and geometrical space.

Intersecting Torus II, 2018, 10.5 h x 15 w, $300

Intersecting Torus II, 2018, 10.5 h x 15 w, $300

For several years, starting with the support of a Jerome Foundation Project Grant for Textile Art in 2014, my intense media focus has been on digitizing for machine embroidery.  There is an assumption that the machine dictates the outcome, doing all the work for you.   The computer and the embroidery machines are the tools that allow me to produce my vision.  To quote Jane McKeating. "Color drips off the needle every bit as richly as that from a brush."

Fraternal Dualities, 2018, 23 h x 22 w, $650

Fraternal Dualities, 2018, 23 h x 22 w, $650

The process is highly technical, using several software packages that can only be described as a non‑intuitive cross between Photoshop and Illustrator. Creating digital embroidery is limited by the geometry and the capability of both the machine and the materials. Needle and thread have real dimension and stitches can only be straight, joined together to suggest curves and forms.

Digital embroidery lends itself to hard edge geometry as well as biomorphic form.  The combination of high tech with "women's work" provides a delicious contrast of hard/soft, nostalgic/current, objective/non-objective. It also lends itself to modular repetition and re-combinations. Themes can be played out quickly in the computer and then stitched and sampled oh so slowly on the machine; combined with and without mixed media in a wide-ranging exploration of forms in space.  

Horizon, 2019, 2 h x 8 w x 4 d, $4000

Horizon, 2019, 2 h x 8 w x 4 d, $4000

In this chaotic time, digital textiles seem like a way to begin to bring order to the world. Order is, however, always unstable, a glimmer of a hope, cut off by random acts of chance or intent. It is no different in digital embroidery.  In the computer, all things seem orderly, put together, and logical... as though the human propensity for chaos did not exist.  In the production, chance operates: human error, flawed thread, broken needles, run out bobbins, high humidity, low humidity, fabric popping out of hoops and the panicked phone call from a friend.  Repair savvy, canny attention and a spirit of wabi sabi is essential.

Cushion Torus-Universe, 2018, 17 h x 18 w, NFS

Cushion Torus-Universe, 2018, 17 h x 18 w, NFS

About the artist:

[Susan Hensel] is a multidisciplinary artists who works across manual and digital media with a special focus on digital embroidery. To view more work by the artist, please visit susanhenselprojects.com. You may also following the artist on Instagram @susan_hensel_multimedia_artist.


If you are an artist or author and are interested in applying for a chance to be featured in Envision Arts Magazine, please email envisionartshow@gmail.com, or visit HERE for application details.